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1.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(8): 544-549, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526211

ABSTRACT

Standard biomarkers have been widely used for COVID-19 diagnosis and prognosis. We hypothesize that thrombogenicity metrics measured by thromboelastography will provide better diagnostic and prognostic utility versus standard biomarkers in COVID-19 positive patients. In this observational prospective study, we included 119 hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients and 15 COVID-19 negative patients. On admission, we measured standard biomarkers and thrombogenicity using a novel thromboelastography assay (TEG-6s). In-hospital all-cause death and thrombotic occurrences (thromboembolism, myocardial infarction and stroke) were recorded. Most COVID-19 patients were African--Americans (68%). COVID-19 patients versus COVID-19 negative patients had higher platelet-fibrin clot strength (P-FCS), fibrin clot strength (FCS) and functional fibrinogen level (FLEV) (P ≤ 0.003 for all). The presence of high TEG-6 s metrics better discriminated COVID-19 positive from negative patients. COVID-19 positive patients with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at least 3 had higher P-FCS, FCS and FLEV than patients with scores less than 3 (P ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analysis, the in-hospital composite endpoint occurrence of death and thrombotic events was independently associated with SOFA score more than 3 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, P = 0.03], diabetes (OR = 3.3, P = 0.02) and FCS > 40 mm (OR = 3.4, P = 0.02). This largest observational study suggested the early diagnostic and prognostic utility of thromboelastography to identify COVID-19 and should be considered hypothesis generating. Our results also support the recent FDA guidance regarding the importance of measurement of whole blood viscoelastic properties in COVID-19 patients. Our findings are consistent with the observation of higher hospitalization rates and poorer outcomes for African--Americans with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , Female , Fibrin/analysis , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome , /statistics & numerical data
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21807, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506761

ABSTRACT

In this study, we compare the predictive value of clinical scoring systems that are already in use in patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), including the Brescia-COVID Respiratory Severity Scale (BCRSS), Quick SOFA (qSOFA), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Multilobular infiltration, hypo-Lymphocytosis, Bacterial coinfection, Smoking history, hyper-Tension, and Age (MuLBSTA) and scoring system for reactive hemophagocytic syndrome (HScore), for determining the severity of the disease. Our aim in this study is to determine which scoring system is most useful in determining disease severity and to guide clinicians. We classified the patients into two groups according to the stage of the disease (severe and non-severe) and adopted interim guidance of the World Health Organization. Severe cases were divided into a group of surviving patients and a deceased group according to the prognosis. According to admission values, the BCRSS, qSOFA, SOFA, MuLBSTA, and HScore were evaluated at admission using the worst parameters available in the first 24 h. Of the 417 patients included in our study, 46 (11%) were in the severe group, while 371 (89%) were in the non-severe group. Of these 417 patients, 230 (55.2%) were men. The median (IQR) age of all patients was 44 (25) years. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, BRCSS in the highest tertile (HR 6.1, 95% CI 2.105-17.674, p = 0.001) was determined as an independent predictor of severe disease in cases of COVID-19. In multivariate analyses, qSOFA was also found to be an independent predictor of severe COVID-19 (HR 4.757, 95% CI 1.438-15.730, p = 0.011). The area under the curve (AUC) of the BRCSS, qSOFA, SOFA, MuLBSTA, and HScore was 0.977, 0.961, 0.958, 0.860, and 0.698, respectively. Calculation of the BRCSS and qSOFA at the time of hospital admission can predict critical clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19, and their predictive value is superior to that of HScore, MuLBSTA, and SOFA. Our prediction is that early interventions for high-risk patients, with early identification of high-risk group using BRCSS and qSOFA, may improve clinical outcomes in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Adult , Aged , Area Under Curve , Coinfection/diagnosis , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lymphocytosis , Male , Middle Aged , Observer Variation , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Patient Admission , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Regression Analysis , Respiration , Respiration Disorders , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Smoking , Treatment Outcome
3.
Cytokine ; 149: 155727, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although pneumonia is the hallmark of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), multiple organ failure may develop in severe disease. TNFα receptors in their soluble form (sTNFR) are involved in the immune cascade in other systemic inflammatory processes such as septic shock, and could mediate the inflammatory activation of distant organs. The aim of this study is to analyse plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 in association with organ failure and outcome in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: After informed consent, we included 122 adult patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 at ICU admission. Demographic data, illness severity scores, organ failure and survival at 30 days were collected. Plasma sTNFR 1 and 2 levels were quantified during the first days after ICU admission. Twenty-five healthy blood donors were used as control group. RESULTS: Levels of sTNFR were higher in severe COVID-19 patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Plasma levels of sTNFR were associated to illness severity scores (SAPS 3 and SOFA), inflammation biomarkers such as IL-6, ferritin and PCT as well as development of AKI during ICU stay. sTNFR 1 higher than 2.29 ng/mL and? sTNFR 2 higher than 11.7 ng/mL were identified as optimal cut-offs to discriminate survivors and non-survivors 30 days after ICU admission and had an area under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.75 and 0.67 respectively. CONCLUSION: Plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 were higher in COVID-19 patients compared to controls and were strongly associated with other inflammatory biomarkers, severity of illness and acute kidney injury development during ICU stay. In addition, sTNFR 1 was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality after adjustment for age and respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(40)2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493346

ABSTRACT

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing evidence suggests that the innate immune responses play an important role in the disease development. A dysregulated inflammatory state has been proposed as a key driver of clinical complications in COVID-19, with a potential detrimental role of granulocytes. However, a comprehensive phenotypic description of circulating granulocytes in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients is lacking. In this study, we used high-dimensional flow cytometry for granulocyte immunophenotyping in peripheral blood collected from COVID-19 patients during acute and convalescent phases. Severe COVID-19 was associated with increased levels of both mature and immature neutrophils, and decreased counts of eosinophils and basophils. Distinct immunotypes were evident in COVID-19 patients, with altered expression of several receptors involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of granulocytes (e.g., CD62L, CD11a/b, CD69, CD63, CXCR4). Paired sampling revealed recovery and phenotypic restoration of the granulocytic signature in the convalescent phase. The identified granulocyte immunotypes correlated with distinct sets of soluble inflammatory markers, supporting pathophysiologic relevance. Furthermore, clinical features, including multiorgan dysfunction and respiratory function, could be predicted using combined laboratory measurements and immunophenotyping. This study provides a comprehensive granulocyte characterization in COVID-19 and reveals specific immunotypes with potential predictive value for key clinical features associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Granulocytes/cytology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunophenotyping , Leukocyte Count , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Organ Dysfunction Scores , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(32): e26900, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475915

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can lead to serious illness and death, and thus, it is particularly important to predict the severity and prognosis of COVID-19. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score has been used to predict the clinical outcomes of patients with multiple organ failure requiring intensive care. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics, risk factors, and relationship between the SOFA score and the prognosis of COVID-19 patients.We retrospectively included all patients ≥18 years old who were diagnosed with COVID-19 in the laboratory continuously admitted to Jingzhou Central Hospital from January 16, 2020 to March 23, 2020. The demographic, clinical manifestations, complications, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes of patients infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 were collected and analyzed. Clinical variables were compared between patients with mild and severe COVID-19. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for severe COVID-19. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze risk factors for hospital-related death. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival differences were assessed by the log-rank test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the SOFA score in different situations were drawn, and the area under the ROC curve was calculated.A total of 117 patients with confirmed diagnoses of COVID-19 were retrospectively analyzed, of which 108 patients were discharged and 9 patients died. The median age of the patients was 50.0 years old (interquartile range [IQR], 35.5-62.0). 63 patients had comorbidities, of which hypertension (27.4%) was the most frequent comorbidities, followed by diabetes (8.5%), stroke (4.3%), coronary heart disease (3.4%), and chronic liver disease (3.4%). The most common symptoms upon admission were fever (82.9%) and dry cough (70.1%). Regression analysis showed that high SOFA scores, advanced age, and hypertension were associated with severe COVID-19. The median SOFA score of all patients was 2 (IQR, 1-3). Patients with severe COVID-19 exhibited a significantly higher SOFA score than patients with mild COVID-19 (3 [IQR, 2-4] vs 1 [IQR, 0-1]; P  < .001). The SOFA score can better identify severe COVID-19, with an odds ratio of 5.851 (95% CI: 3.044-11.245; P < .001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the SOFA score in predicting severe COVID-19 (cutoff value = 2; AUC = 0.908 [95% CI: 0.857-0.960]; sensitivity: 85.20%; specificity: 80.40%) and the risk of death in COVID-19 patients (cutoff value = 5; AUC = 0.995 [95% CI: 0.985-1.000]; sensitivity: 100.00%; specificity: 95.40%). Regarding the 60-day mortality rates of patients in the 2 groups classified by the optimal cutoff value of the SOFA score (5), patients in the high SOFA score group (SOFA score ≥5) had a significantly greater risk of death than those in the low SOFA score group (SOFA score < 5).The SOFA score could be used to evaluate the severity and 60-day mortality of COVID-19. The SOFA score may be an independent risk factor for in-hospital death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Adult , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Statistics, Nonparametric
6.
Crit Care Med ; 49(11): 1974-1982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475880
7.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1779-1786, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462157

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An unexpected high prevalence of enterococcal bloodstream infection (BSI) has been observed in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The primary objective was to describe the characteristics of ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI in critically ill patients with COVID-19. A secondary objective was to exploratorily assess the predictors of 30-day mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients with ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI. RESULTS: During the study period, 223 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to COVID-19-dedicated ICUs in our centre. Overall, 51 episodes of enterococcal BSI, occurring in 43 patients, were registered. 29 (56.9%) and 22 (43.1%) BSI were caused by Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, respectively. The cumulative incidence of ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI was of 229 episodes per 1000 ICU admissions (95% mid-p confidence interval [CI] 172-298). Most patients received an empirical therapy with at least one agent showing in vitro activity against the blood isolate (38/43, 88%). The crude 30-day mortality was 42% (18/43) and 57% (4/7) in the entire series and in patients with vancomycin-resistant E. faecium BSI, respectively. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score showed an independent association with increased mortality (odds ratio 1.32 per one-point increase, with 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.66, p = .021). CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative incidence of enterococcal BSI is high in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Our results suggest a crucial role of the severity of the acute clinical conditions, to which both the underlying viral pneumonia and the enterococcal BSI may contribute, in majorly influencing the outcome.KEY MESSAGESThe cumulative incidence of enterococcal BSI is high in critically ill patients with COVID-19.The crude 30-day mortality of enterococcal BSI in critically ill patients with COVID-19 may be higher than 40%.There could be a crucial role of the severity of the acute clinical conditions, to which both the underlying viral pneumonia and the enterococcal BSI may contribute, in majorly influencing the outcome.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Enterococcus faecalis , Enterococcus faecium , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Mortality , Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Critical Illness , Female , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
JAMA ; 323(16): 1582-1589, 2020 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453469

ABSTRACT

Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic with no specific therapeutic agents and substantial mortality. It is critical to find new treatments. Objective: To determine whether convalescent plasma transfusion may be beneficial in the treatment of critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case series of 5 critically ill patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) who met the following criteria: severe pneumonia with rapid progression and continuously high viral load despite antiviral treatment; Pao2/Fio2 <300; and mechanical ventilation. All 5 were treated with convalescent plasma transfusion. The study was conducted at the infectious disease department, Shenzhen Third People's Hospital in Shenzhen, China, from January 20, 2020, to March 25, 2020; final date of follow-up was March 25, 2020. Clinical outcomes were compared before and after convalescent plasma transfusion. Exposures: Patients received transfusion with convalescent plasma with a SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody (IgG) binding titer greater than 1:1000 (end point dilution titer, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) and a neutralization titer greater than 40 (end point dilution titer) that had been obtained from 5 patients who recovered from COVID-19. Convalescent plasma was administered between 10 and 22 days after admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Changes of body temperature, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (range 0-24, with higher scores indicating more severe illness), Pao2/Fio2, viral load, serum antibody titer, routine blood biochemical index, ARDS, and ventilatory and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports before and after convalescent plasma transfusion. Results: All 5 patients (age range, 36-65 years; 2 women) were receiving mechanical ventilation at the time of treatment and all had received antiviral agents and methylprednisolone. Following plasma transfusion, body temperature normalized within 3 days in 4 of 5 patients, the SOFA score decreased, and Pao2/Fio2 increased within 12 days (range, 172-276 before and 284-366 after). Viral loads also decreased and became negative within 12 days after the transfusion, and SARS-CoV-2-specific ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers increased following the transfusion (range, 40-60 before and 80-320 on day 7). ARDS resolved in 4 patients at 12 days after transfusion, and 3 patients were weaned from mechanical ventilation within 2 weeks of treatment. Of the 5 patients, 3 have been discharged from the hospital (length of stay: 53, 51, and 55 days), and 2 are in stable condition at 37 days after transfusion. Conclusions and Relevance: In this preliminary uncontrolled case series of 5 critically ill patients with COVID-19 and ARDS, administration of convalescent plasma containing neutralizing antibody was followed by improvement in their clinical status. The limited sample size and study design preclude a definitive statement about the potential effectiveness of this treatment, and these observations require evaluation in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 344, 2021 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The primary aim of this study was to assess the outcome of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients treated during the spring and autumn COVID-19 surges in Europe. METHODS: This was a prospective European observational study (the COVIP study) in ICU patients aged 70 years and older admitted with COVID-19 disease from March to December 2020 to 159 ICUs in 14 European countries. An electronic database was used to register a number of parameters including: SOFA score, Clinical Frailty Scale, co-morbidities, usual ICU procedures and survival at 90 days. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04321265). RESULTS: In total, 2625 patients were included, 1327 from the first and 1298 from the second surge. Median age was 74 and 75 years in surge 1 and 2, respectively. SOFA score was higher in the first surge (median 6 versus 5, p < 0.0001). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission was higher during surge 1, and more patients received invasive mechanical ventilation (78% versus 68%, p < 0.0001). During the first 15 days of treatment, survival was similar during the first and the second surge. Survival was lower in the second surge after day 15 and differed after 30 days (57% vs 50%) as well as after 90 days (51% vs 40%). CONCLUSION: An unexpected, but significant, decrease in 30-day and 90-day survival was observed during the second surge in our cohort of elderly ICU patients. The reason for this is unclear. Our main concern is whether the widespread changes in practice and treatment of COVID-19 between the two surges have contributed to this increased mortality in elderly patients. Further studies are urgently warranted to provide more evidence for current practice in elderly patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04321265 , registered March 19th, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Frail Elderly , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(40)2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434221

ABSTRACT

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing evidence suggests that the innate immune responses play an important role in the disease development. A dysregulated inflammatory state has been proposed as a key driver of clinical complications in COVID-19, with a potential detrimental role of granulocytes. However, a comprehensive phenotypic description of circulating granulocytes in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients is lacking. In this study, we used high-dimensional flow cytometry for granulocyte immunophenotyping in peripheral blood collected from COVID-19 patients during acute and convalescent phases. Severe COVID-19 was associated with increased levels of both mature and immature neutrophils, and decreased counts of eosinophils and basophils. Distinct immunotypes were evident in COVID-19 patients, with altered expression of several receptors involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of granulocytes (e.g., CD62L, CD11a/b, CD69, CD63, CXCR4). Paired sampling revealed recovery and phenotypic restoration of the granulocytic signature in the convalescent phase. The identified granulocyte immunotypes correlated with distinct sets of soluble inflammatory markers, supporting pathophysiologic relevance. Furthermore, clinical features, including multiorgan dysfunction and respiratory function, could be predicted using combined laboratory measurements and immunophenotyping. This study provides a comprehensive granulocyte characterization in COVID-19 and reveals specific immunotypes with potential predictive value for key clinical features associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Granulocytes/cytology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunophenotyping , Leukocyte Count , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Organ Dysfunction Scores , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
11.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257608, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score predicts probability of in-hospital mortality. Many crisis standards of care suggest the use of SOFA scores to allocate medical resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESEARCH QUESTION: Are SOFA scores elevated among Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, compared to Non-Hispanic White patients? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Retrospective cohort study conducted in Yale New Haven Health System, including 5 hospitals with total of 2681 beds. Study population drawn from consecutive patients aged ≥18 admitted with COVID-19 from March 29th to August 1st, 2020. Patients excluded from the analysis if not their first admission with COVID-19, if they did not have SOFA score recorded within 24 hours of admission, if race and ethnicity data were not Non-Hispanic Black, Non-Hispanic White, or Hispanic, or if they had other missing data. The primary outcome was SOFA score, with peak score within 24 hours of admission dichotomized as <6 or ≥6. RESULTS: Of 2982 patients admitted with COVID-19, 2320 met inclusion criteria and were analyzed, of whom 1058 (45.6%) were Non-Hispanic White, 645 (27.8%) were Hispanic, and 617 (26.6%) were Non-Hispanic Black. Median age was 65.0 and 1226 (52.8%) were female. In univariate logistic screen and in full multivariate model, Non-Hispanic Black patients but not Hispanic patients had greater odds of an elevated SOFA score ≥6 when compared to Non-Hispanic White patients (OR 1.49, 95%CI 1.11-1.99). INTERPRETATION: Given current unequal patterns in social determinants of health, US crisis standards of care utilizing the SOFA score to allocate medical resources would be more likely to deny these resources to Non-Hispanic Black patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Connecticut/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256763, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact in the United States, particularly for Black populations, and has heavily burdened the healthcare system. Hospitals have created protocols to allocate limited resources, but there is concern that these protocols will exacerbate disparities. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is a tool often used in triage protocols. In these protocols, patients with higher SOFA scores are denied resources based on the assumption that they have worse clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess whether using SOFA score as a triage tool among COVID-positive patients would exacerbate racial disparities in clinical outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed data from a retrospective cohort of hospitalized COVID-positive patients in the Yale-New Haven Health System. We examined associations between race/ethnicity and peak overall/24-hour SOFA score, in-hospital mortality, and ICU admission. Other predictors of interest were age, sex, primary language, and insurance status. We used one-way ANOVA and chi-square tests to assess differences in SOFA score across racial/ethnic groups and linear and logistic regression to assess differences in clinical outcomes by sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: Our final sample included 2,554 patients. Black patients had higher SOFA scores compared to patients of other races. However, Black patients did not have significantly greater in-hospital mortality or ICU admission compared to patients of other races. CONCLUSION: While Black patients in this sample of hospitalized COVID-positive patients had higher SOFA scores compared to patients of other races, this did not translate to higher in-hospital mortality or ICU admission. Results demonstrate that if SOFA score had been used to allocate care, Black COVID patients would have been denied care despite having similar clinical outcomes to white patients. Therefore, using SOFA score to allocate resources has the potential to exacerbate racial inequities by disproportionately denying care to Black patients and should not be used to determine access to care. Healthcare systems must develop and use COVID-19 triage protocols that prioritize equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Connecticut , Female , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Hospital Mortality/ethnology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Triage/methods , Young Adult
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 951, 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic, resulting in considerable mortality. The risk factors, clinical treatments, especially comprehensive risk models for COVID-19 death are urgently warranted. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 281 non-survivors and 712 survivors with propensity score matching by age, sex, and comorbidities were enrolled from January 13, 2020 to March 31, 2020. RESULTS: Higher SOFA, qSOFA, APACHE II and SIRS scores, hypoxia, elevated inflammatory cytokines, multi-organ dysfunction, decreased immune cell subsets, and complications were significantly associated with the higher COVID-19 death risk. In addition to traditional predictors for death risk, including APACHE II (AUC = 0.83), SIRS (AUC = 0.75), SOFA (AUC = 0.70) and qSOFA scores (AUC = 0.61), another four prediction models that included immune cells subsets (AUC = 0.90), multiple organ damage biomarkers (AUC = 0.89), complications (AUC = 0.88) and inflammatory-related indexes (AUC = 0.75) were established. Additionally, the predictive accuracy of combining these risk factors (AUC = 0.950) was also significantly higher than that of each risk group alone, which was significant for early clinical management for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The potential risk factors could help to predict the clinical prognosis of COVID-19 patients at an early stage. The combined model might be more suitable for the death risk evaluation of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 951, 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic, resulting in considerable mortality. The risk factors, clinical treatments, especially comprehensive risk models for COVID-19 death are urgently warranted. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 281 non-survivors and 712 survivors with propensity score matching by age, sex, and comorbidities were enrolled from January 13, 2020 to March 31, 2020. RESULTS: Higher SOFA, qSOFA, APACHE II and SIRS scores, hypoxia, elevated inflammatory cytokines, multi-organ dysfunction, decreased immune cell subsets, and complications were significantly associated with the higher COVID-19 death risk. In addition to traditional predictors for death risk, including APACHE II (AUC = 0.83), SIRS (AUC = 0.75), SOFA (AUC = 0.70) and qSOFA scores (AUC = 0.61), another four prediction models that included immune cells subsets (AUC = 0.90), multiple organ damage biomarkers (AUC = 0.89), complications (AUC = 0.88) and inflammatory-related indexes (AUC = 0.75) were established. Additionally, the predictive accuracy of combining these risk factors (AUC = 0.950) was also significantly higher than that of each risk group alone, which was significant for early clinical management for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The potential risk factors could help to predict the clinical prognosis of COVID-19 patients at an early stage. The combined model might be more suitable for the death risk evaluation of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17476, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392881

ABSTRACT

Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an inflammatory biomarker and risk factor for kidney diseases, with a potential prognostic value in critically ill patients. In this monocentric prospective study, we measured plasma suPAR levels immediately after ICU admission in unselected 237 consecutive patients using a turbidimetric assay. Primary objective was the prognostic value for ICU- and 28-day mortality. Secondary objectives were association with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, coagulation and inflammation markers, AKI-3 and differences in prespecified subgroups. Median suPAR levels were 8.0 ng/mL [25th-75th percentile 4.3-14.4], with lower levels in ICU survivors than non-survivors (6.7 vs. 11.6 ng/mL, p < 0.001). SuPAR levels were higher in COVID-19, kidney disease, moderate-to-severe liver disease, and sepsis. ICU mortality increased by an odds ratio (OR) of 4.7 in patients with the highest compared to lowest quartile suPAR. Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimates at 3 months were 63% and 49%, in patients with suPAR below/above 12 ng/mL (log-rank p = 0.027). Due to an observed interaction between SOFA score and suPAR, we performed a random forest method identifying cutoffs. ICU mortality was 53%, 17% and 2% in patients with a SOFA score > 7, SOFA ≤ 7 & suPAR > 8 ng/mL, and SOFA score ≤ 7 & suPAR ≤ 8 ng/mL, respectively. suPAR was a significant predictor for AKI-3 occurrence (OR per doubling 1.89, 95% CI: 1.20-2.98; p = 0.006). suPAR levels at ICU admission may offer additional value for risk stratification especially in ICU patients with moderate organ dysfunction as reflected by a SOFA score ≤ 7.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Critical Illness/mortality , Kidney Diseases/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , Renal Insufficiency/mortality , Aged , Female , Humans , Immunoturbidimetry , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Odds Ratio , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Renal Insufficiency/blood , Survival Analysis
16.
Rev Invest Clin ; 73(6): 399-407COVID-19, 2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospital bed saturation has been one of the problems to solve during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. However, not every patient who is admitted requires close monitoring or specific therapeutics. Mild cases could be managed in the outpatient setting. OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to analyze the accuracy of the oxygen saturation/respiratory rate (sat/RR) index, NEWS2, CURB65, and quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) scores to predict supplemental oxygen requirement and prolonged hospital stay in patients with mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A prospective cohort study in an academic medical center. We compared the values of these scores according to the occurrence or not of each outcome. When differences between groups were statistically significant, the discriminatory capacity of the score for that outcome was analyzed. RESULTS: We included 271 patients. Of them, 11.07% required supplemental oxygen, showing significantly higher values of NEWS2 score and qSOFA score, and lower values of Sat/RR index. About 38% presented prolonged hospital stay, with significantly higher values of NEWS2 score and lower values of sat/RR index. The ROC curve area under the curve (AUC) of sat/RR index to discriminate the requirement of supplemental oxygen was 0.72 (CI 95% 0.61-0.84). The ROC curve of NEWS2 and qSOFA for the same outcome was 0.75 (95% [95% CI 0.65-0.85]) and 0.66 (95% CI 0.57-0.76), respectively. The ability of the Sat/RR index to discriminate the requirement of prolonged hospitalization showed an AUC of 0.67 (95% [95% CI 0.60- 0.73]). The NEWS2 score showed an AUC of 0.63 (CI 95% 0.56-0.70) for the same outcome. CONCLUSIONS: sat/RR index and NEWS2 score have a good capacity to discriminate patients at risk of clinical worsening, being the Sat/RR index simpler and easier to calculate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Oxygen/blood , Respiratory Rate , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Argentina , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
17.
Trials ; 22(1): 546, 2021 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367681

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High-dose intravenous vitamin C directly scavenges and decreases the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ischemia/reperfusion after a cardiac arrest. The aim of this study is to investigate whether short-term treatment with a supplementary or very high-dose intravenous vitamin C reduces organ failure in post-cardiac arrest patients. METHODS: This is a double-blind, multi-center, randomized placebo-controlled trial conducted in 7 intensive care units (ICUs) in The Netherlands. A total of 270 patients with cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation will be randomly assigned to three groups of 90 patients (1:1:1 ratio, stratified by site and age). Patients will intravenously receive a placebo, a supplementation dose of 3 g of vitamin C or a pharmacological dose of 10 g of vitamin C per day for 96 h. The primary endpoint is organ failure at 96 h as measured by the Resuscitation-Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (R-SOFA) score at 96 h minus the baseline score (delta R-SOFA). Secondary endpoints are a neurological outcome, mortality, length of ICU and hospital stay, myocardial injury, vasopressor support, lung injury score, ventilator-free days, renal function, ICU-acquired weakness, delirium, oxidative stress parameters, and plasma vitamin C concentrations. DISCUSSION: Vitamin C supplementation is safe and preclinical studies have shown beneficial effects of high-dose IV vitamin C in cardiac arrest models. This is the first RCT to assess the clinical effect of intravenous vitamin C on organ dysfunction in critically ill patients after cardiac arrest. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03509662. Registered on April 26, 2018. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03509662 European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT): 2017-004318-25. Registered on June 8, 2018. https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2017-004318-25/NL.


Subject(s)
Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome , Ascorbic Acid , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 673693, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365541

ABSTRACT

Background: Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1) is widely used to treat patients with COVID-19 in China; however, its efficacy remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the efficacy of Tα1 as a COVID-19 therapy. Methods: We performed a multicenter cohort study in five tertiary hospitals in the Hubei province of China between December 2019 and March 2020. The patient non-recovery rate was used as the primary outcome. Results: All crude outcomes, including non-recovery rate (65/306 vs. 290/1,976, p = 0.003), in-hospital mortality rate (62/306 vs. 271/1,976, p = 0.003), intubation rate (31/306 vs. 106/1,976, p = 0.001), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) incidence (104/306 vs. 499/1,976, p = 0.001), acute kidney injury (AKI) incidence (26/306 vs. 66/1,976, p < 0.001), and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (14.9 ± 12.7 vs. 8.7 ± 8.2 days, p < 0.001), were significantly higher in the Tα1 treatment group. After adjusting for confounding factors, Tα1 use was found to be significantly associated with a higher non-recovery rate than non-Tα1 use (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, p = 0.028). An increased risk of non-recovery rate associated with Tα1 use was observed in the patient subgroups with maximum sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores ≥2 (OR 2.0, 95%CI 1.4-2.9, p = 0.024), a record of ICU admission (OR 5.4, 95%CI 2.1-14.0, p < 0.001), and lower PaO2/FiO2 values (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.4, p = 0.046). Furthermore, later initiation of Tα1 use was associated with a higher non-recovery rate. Conclusion: Tα1 use in COVID-19 patients was associated with an increased non-recovery rate, especially in those with greater disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Thymalfasin/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Thymalfasin/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome
19.
Am J Law Med ; 47(2-3): 264-290, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361584

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus pandemic intensified, many communities in the United States experienced shortages of ventilators, intensive care beds, and other medical supplies and treatments. Currently, there is no single national response to provide guidance on allocation of scarce health care resources. Accordingly, states have formulated various "triage protocols" to prioritize those who will receive care and those who may not have the same access to health care services when the population demand exceeds the supply. Triage protocols address general concepts of "fairness" under accepted medical ethics rules and the consensus is that limited medical resources "should be allocated to do the greatest good for the greatest number of people."1 The actual utility of this utilitarian ethics approach is questionable, however, leaving many questions about what is "fair" unanswered. Saving as many people as possible during a health care crisis is a laudable goal but not at the expense of ignoring patients's legal rights, which are not suspended during the crisis. This Article examines the triage protocols from six states to determine whose rights are being recognized and whose rights are being denied, answering the pivotal question: If there is potential for disparate impact of facially neutral state triage protocols against Black Americans and other ethnic groups, is this legally actionable discrimination? This may be a case of first impression for the courts to resolve."[B]lack Americans are 3.5 times more likely to die of COVID-19 than [W]hite Americans … . Latinx people are almost twice as likely to die of the disease, compared with [W]hite people." 2 "Our civil rights laws protect the equal dignity of every human life from ruthless utilitarianism … . HHS is committed to leaving no one behind during an emergency, and this guidance is designed to help health care providers meet that goal." - Roger Severino, Office of Civil Rights Director, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 3.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Civil Rights/legislation & jurisprudence , Ethics, Medical , Health Care Rationing/legislation & jurisprudence , Liability, Legal , Triage/legislation & jurisprudence , Ethical Theory , Humans , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Racism , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Discrimination , United States/epidemiology
20.
J Surg Res ; 266: 35-43, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bedside experience and studies of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) indicate COVID-19 to be a devastating multisystem disease. We aim to describe the incidence, associated variables, and outcomes of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill COVID-19 patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data for all critically ill adult patients (≥18 years old) admitted to the ICU at a large academic medical center with confirmed COVID-19 between March 13, 2020 and April 18, 2020 were prospectively collected. Patients with serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations greater than 1000 U/L were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis. Patients were further stratified as having moderate (serum CK concentration 1000-4999 U/L) or severe (serum CK concentration ≥5000 U/L) rhabdomyolysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify outcomes and variables associated with the development of rhabdomyolysis. RESULTS: Of 235 critically ill COVID-19 patients, 114 (48.5%) met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Patients with rhabdomyolysis more often required mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001), prone positioning (P < 0.001), pharmacological paralysis (P < 0.001), renal replacement therapy (P = 0.010), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (P = 0.025). They also had longer median ICU length of stay (LOS) (P < 0.001) and hospital LOS (P < 0.001). No difference in mortality was observed. Male sex, patients with morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone positioning were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of critically ill COVID-19 patients in our cohort met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Male sex, morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone position were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Rhabdomyolysis/epidemiology , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Creatine Kinase/blood , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Rhabdomyolysis/blood , Rhabdomyolysis/diagnosis , Rhabdomyolysis/etiology , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sex Factors
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