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1.
Am J Transplant ; 22 Suppl 2: 519-552, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735847

ABSTRACT

SRTR uses data collected by OPTN to calculate metrics such as donation rate, organ yield, and rate of organs recovered for transplant but not transplanted. In 2020, there were 12,588 deceased donors, an increase from 11,870 in 2019; this number has been increasing since 2010. The number of deceased donor transplants increased to 33,303 in 2020, from 32,313 in 2019; this number has been increasing since 2012. The increase may be due in part to the rising number of deaths of young people amid the ongoing opioid epidemic. The number of organs transplanted included 18,410 kidneys, 962 pancreata, 8350 livers, 91 intestines, 3722 hearts, and 2463 lungs. Compared with 2019, transplants of all organs except pancreata and lung transplants increased in 2020, which is remarkable despite the pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV2 virus. In 2020, 4870 kidneys, 294 pancreata, 861 livers, 3 intestines, 39 hearts, and 115 lungs were discarded. The number of discards was similar to that of the previous year. In 2019, 4,324 kidneys, 346 pancreata, 867 livers, 5 intestines, 31 hearts, and 148 lungs were discarded. These numbers suggest an opportunity to increase numbers of transplants by reducing discards. Despite the pandemic, there was no dramatic increase in number of discards and an increase in total number of donors and transplants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organ Transplantation/standards , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors/classification , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/trends
2.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 19(12): 1313-1321, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515624

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In India, organ donation and transplant activities are managed under the National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation, established per the mandate of the Transplantation of Human Organs and Tissues Act 1994, as stipulated by World Health Organization guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation reached out to various hospitals and concerned authorities at national, regional, and local levels through E-mails and telephone calls to gather and to analyze 2019 data regarding the World Health Organization-Global Observatory on Donation and Transplantation questionnaire. RESULTS: In 2019, India had 550 transplant centers registered with state-appropriate authorities and 140 nontransplant organ retrieval centers. Most living donors were kidney donors (8613) or liver donors (1993). Of all solid-organ transplants, most were kidney transplants, followed by liver, heart, lung, and pancreas. There were few heart and pancreas transplants in 2019, with higher percentage of female donors (65.4% and 54.3%, respectively, n = 5633 and 1084). Of transplant procedures, there were more living donor transplants (84%, n = 10 600) than deceased donor transplants (16%, n = 2023). Among all organs, wait lists for kidney transplants were higher than for other organs. CONCLUSIONS: Reporting on organ donation and transplant of 2019 from the National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation, India's national registry, continued in 2020 despite the challenges of COVID-19. India has been submitting organ donation and transplant data at the national level to the Global Observatory on Donation and Transplantation consistently from 2013 to 2019 and is the only country in the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region to have done so, providing information from all states and union territories in India.


Subject(s)
Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Female , Humans , Living Donors , Male , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Tissue Donors , Tissue and Organ Procurement/trends , Treatment Outcome
4.
Lancet Public Health ; 6(10): e709-e719, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Preliminary data suggest that COVID-19 has reduced access to solid organ transplantation. However, the global consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on transplantation rates and the effect on waitlisted patients have not been reported. We aimed to assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on transplantation and investigate if the pandemic was associated with heterogeneous adaptation in terms of organ transplantation, with ensuing consequences for waitlisted patients. METHODS: In this population-based, observational, before-and-after study, we collected and validated nationwide cohorts of consecutive kidney, liver, lung, and heart transplants from 22 countries. Data were collected from Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2020, along with data from the same period in 2019. The analysis was done from the onset of the 100th cumulative COVID-19 case through to Dec 31, 2020. We assessed the effect of the pandemic on the worldwide organ transplantation rate and the disparity in transplant numbers within each country. We estimated the number of waitlisted patient life-years lost due to the negative effects of the pandemic. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04416256. FINDINGS: Transplant activity in all countries studied showed an overall decrease during the pandemic. Kidney transplantation was the most affected, followed by lung, liver, and heart. We identified three organ transplant rate patterns, as follows: countries with a sharp decrease in transplantation rate with a low COVID-19-related death rate; countries with a moderate decrease in transplantation rate with a moderate COVID-19-related death rate; and countries with a slight decrease in transplantation rate despite a high COVID-19-related death rate. Temporal trends revealed a marked worldwide reduction in transplant activity during the first 3 months of the pandemic, with losses stabilising after June, 2020, but decreasing again from October to December, 2020. The overall reduction in transplants during the observation time period translated to 48 239 waitlisted patient life-years lost. INTERPRETATION: We quantified the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on worldwide organ transplantation activity and revealed heterogeneous adaptation in terms of organ transplantation, both at national levels and within countries, with detrimental consequences for waitlisted patients. Understanding how different countries and health-care systems responded to COVID-19-related challenges could facilitate improved pandemic preparedness, notably, how to safely maintain transplant programmes, both with immediate and non-immediate life-saving potential, to prevent loss of patient life-years. FUNDING: French national research agency (INSERM) ATIP Avenir and Fondation Bettencourt Schueller.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Humans
5.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e932025, 2021 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335415

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, due to infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which began in March 2020, affected organ donor acceptance and rates of heart, lung, kidney, and liver transplants worldwide. According to data reported to POLTRANSPLANT, the number of solid organ transplants decreased by over 35% and the number of patients enlisted de novo for organ transplantation was reduced to 70% of its pre-COVID-19 volume in Poland. Most transplant centers in Western Europe and the USA have also drastically reduced their activity when compared to the pre-pandemic era. Areas of high SARS-CoV-2 infection incidence, like Italy, Spain, and France, were most affected. Significant decreases in organ donation and number of transplant procedures and increase in waitlist deaths have been noted due to overload of the healthcare system as well as uncertainty of donor SARS-CoV-2 status. Intensive care unit bed shortages and less intensive care resources available for donor management are major factors limiting access to organ procurement. The impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on transplant activities was not so adverse in Asia, as a result of a strategy based on experience gained during a previous SARS pandemic. This review aims to compare the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on solid organ transplantation during 2020 in Poland with countries in Western Europe, North America, and Asia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Donor Selection/organization & administration , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Asia , Europe , Humans , North America , Poland
6.
Nat Rev Nephrol ; 17(8): 554-568, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319029

ABSTRACT

Although overall donation and transplantation activity is higher in Europe than on other continents, differences between European countries in almost every aspect of transplantation activity (for example, in the number of transplantations, the number of people with a functioning graft, in rates of living versus deceased donation, and in the use of expanded criteria donors) suggest that there is ample room for improvement. Herein we review the policy and clinical measures that should be considered to increase access to transplantation and improve post-transplantation outcomes. This Roadmap, generated by a group of major European stakeholders collaborating within a Thematic Network, presents an outline of the challenges to increasing transplantation rates and proposes 12 key areas along with specific measures that should be considered to promote transplantation. This framework can be adopted by countries and institutions that are interested in advancing transplantation, both within and outside the European Union. Within this framework, a priority ranking of initiatives is suggested that could serve as the basis for a new European Union Action Plan on Organ Donation and Transplantation.


Subject(s)
Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Europe/epidemiology , European Union , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Stakeholder Participation , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists/mortality
7.
Curr Opin Organ Transplant ; 26(4): 412-418, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254919

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic is a major challenge to global health, particularly among vulnerable populations. Here, we describe the emerging epidemiology and relevant data on treatment options for COVID-19. We discuss the implications of current knowledge for solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. RECENT FINDINGS: Risk factors and outcomes of COVID-19 among SOT recipients remain uncertain, but recent data suggest similar outcomes to the general population. Case reports of donor-derived SARS-CoV-2 infection are emerging. Few studies on treatment of COVID-19 among SOT recipients are available, and therefore, general recommendations are similar to the general population. Vaccine efficacy in the SOT population is uncertain. SUMMARY: COVID-19 remains a significant threat to SOT recipients and studies on treatment and prevention specific to this population are urgently needed. Although vaccines represent the greatest hope to control this pandemic, their efficacy in this immunocompromised population is uncertain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Risk Factors , Tissue Donors
8.
Epidemiol. serv. saúde ; 30(1): e2020754, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1218447

ABSTRACT

Objetivo Descrever as doações e os transplantes de órgãos no Ceará, Brasil, após a declaração da pandemia da COVID-19. Métodos Estudo descritivo, com dados da Associação Brasileira de Transplantes de Órgãos. O número de doadores e transplantes do período de abril a junho de 2020 foi comparado ao mesmo período de 2019 e ao primeiro trimestre de 2020. Resultados No primeiro semestre de 2020, o estado registrou 72 doadores efetivos. Destes, 17 (23,6%) no segundo trimestre. Dos 352 transplantes do primeiro semestre de 2020, 37 (10,7%) foram realizados no segundo trimestre. Em comparação ao período de abril a junho de 2019, houve redução de 67,9% e 89,3% no número de doadores e transplantes, respectivamente, no mesmo período de 2020. Conclusão Os números de doadores e transplantes do Ceará apresentaram importante declínio nos três meses seguintes ao decreto da pandemia da COVID-19, especialmente os das modalidades de rim, coração e córneas.


Objetivo Describir las donaciones y trasplantes de órganos en Ceará, Brasil, después de la declaración de la pandemia COVID-19. Métodos estudio descriptivo con datos de la Asociación Brasileña de Trasplantes de Órganos. Se comparó el número de donantes y trasplantes de abril a junio de 2020 con el mismo período de 2019 y el primer trimestre de 2020. Resultados El primer semestre de 2020, Ceará registró 72 donantes efectivos. De estos, 17 (23,6%) en el segundo trimestre. De 352 trasplantes realizados en el primer semestre de 2020, 37 (10.7%) fueron realizados en el segundo trimestre. En comparación al período de abril a junio de 2019, hubo reducción de 67,9% y 89,3% en el número de donantes y trasplantes, respectivamente, en el mismo período de 2020. Conclusión El número de donantes y trasplantes en Ceará mostró importante disminución en los tres meses siguientes al decreto pandémico COVID-19, especialmente las modalidades renal, cardíaca y córneas.


Objective To describe organ donations and transplants in Ceará state, Brazil, following the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods This was a descriptive study using data from the Brazilian Organ Transplantation Association. The number of donors and transplants from April to June 2020 was compared to the same period in 2019 and to the first quarter of 2020. Results In the first half of 2020, the state registered 72 effective donors, just 17 (23.6%) of whom related to the second quarter. Of the 352 transplants in the first half of 2020, 37 (10.7%) were performed in the second quarter. Compared with the period from April to June 2019, there was a reduction of 67.9% and 89.3% in the number of donors and transplants, respectively, in the same period of 2020. Conclusion The number of donors and transplants in Ceará showed an important fall in the three months following the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic, especially for kidney, heart and cornea transplants.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Organ Transplantation/trends , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Brazil , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data
9.
Prog Transplant ; 31(2): 171-173, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136201

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been well-documented to have a variable impact on individual communities and health care systems. We describe the experience of a single organ procurement organization (OPO), located in an area without a large cluster of cases during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. A review of community health data describing the impact of COVID-19 nationally and in Oklahoma was conducted. Additionally, a retrospective review of available OPO data from March 2019-May 2020 was performed. While the amount of donor referrals received and organs recovered by the OPO remained stable in the initial months of the pandemic, the observed organs transplanted vs. expected organs transplanted (O:E) decreased to the lowest number in the 15-month period and organs transplanted decreased as well. Fewer organs from Oklahoma donors were accepted for transplant despite staff spending more time allocating organs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Tissue Donors/supply & distribution , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oklahoma/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
Transplantation ; 104(11): 2221-2224, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005670

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The regional impact of coronavirus disease 2019 on solid organ transplantation in the United States has not been fully evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of month-to-month trends on waitlist additions, waitlist deaths, and transplant surgeries between all United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) regions was performed. A linear regression model trained on historical data was used to estimate anticipated transplantation volume. RESULTS: All UNOS regions reported a decrease in total waitlist additions and transplant surgeries. The largest decreases in total transplants were identified in regions 1, 2, 6, and 9, with regions 2, 7, 8, and 9 noting the largest decrease in waitlist additions. Six of the 11 regions noted increases in waitlist deaths, with UNOS regions 9, 1, and 2, all located within the Northeast, noting the highest percent increase in waitlist deaths at 170%, 89%, and 54%, respectively. The largest reductions in solid organ transplantation and waitlist deaths were seen in kidney and lung transplantation. Current transplantation volume is significantly lower than the low range of the 95% confidence interval derived from the linear regression model (2182 versus 3110; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Significant decreases in total waitlist additions and transplant surgeries with increases in waitlist deaths were noted in the majority of US transplant domains. The impact was especially prevalent in areas with high burden of coronavirus disease 2019 infection. National and regional strategies aimed at minimizing disruptions in transplantation are needed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Waiting Lists , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
11.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 150: w20451, 2020 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004918

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on patients listed for solid organ transplantation has not been systematically investigated to date. Thus, we assessed occurrence and effects of infections with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on patients on the Swiss national waiting list for solid organ transplantation. METHODS: Patient data were retrospectively extracted from the Swiss Organ Allocation System (SOAS). From 16 March to 31 May 2020, we included all patients listed for solid organ transplantation on the Swiss national waiting list who were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Severity of COVID-19 was categorised as follows: stage I, mild symptoms; stage II, moderate to severe symptoms; stage III, critical symptoms; stage IV, death. We compared the incidence rate (laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2), the hospital admission rate (number of admissions of SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals), and the case fatality rate (number of deaths of SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals) in our study population with the general Swiss population during the study period, calculating age-adjusted standardised incidence ratios and standardised mortality ratios, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: A total of 1439 patients were registered on the Swiss national solid organ transplantation waiting list on 31 May 31 2020. Twenty-four (1.7%) waiting list patients were reported to test positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the study period. The median age was 56 years (interquartile range 45.3–65.8), and 14 (58%) were male. Of all patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, two patients were asymptomatic, 14 (58%) presented in COVID-19 stage I, 3 (13%) in stage II, and 5 (21%) in stage III. Eight patients (33%) were admitted to hospital, four (17%) required intensive care, and three (13%) mechanical ventilation. Twenty-two patients (92%) of all those infected recovered, but two male patients aged >65 years with multiple comorbidities died in hospital from respiratory failure. Comparing our study population with the general Swiss population, the age-adjusted standardised incidence ratio was 4.1 (95% CI 2.7–6.0). CONCLUSION: The overall rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections in candidates awaiting solid organ transplantation was four times higher than in the Swiss general population; however, the frequency of testing likely played a role. Given the small sample size of affected patients, conclusions have to be drawn cautiously and results need verification in larger cohorts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Switzerland/epidemiology
12.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 150: w20447, 2020 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004916

ABSTRACT

The Swiss stepwise shutdown approach in organ donation and transplantation helped to maintain a limited national organ procurement and vital organ transplant activity, avoiding a complete nationwide shutdown of organ donation and transplant activity. .


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
13.
Transplantation ; 105(1): 61-66, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991010

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has significantly upended solid organ transplant (SOT) practice around the world. Early reports confirmed the heavy burden of COVID-19 in SOT recipients with mortality rates reaching up to 35%. Because most transplant recipients harbored multiple comorbidities known to be associated with a severe course of COVID-19, the true impact of immunosuppression by itself remained an unsolved issue. Transplant societies have initially recommended to postpone nonurgent renal transplantations, while trying to maintain life-saving transplant programs, such as heart, lung, and liver transplantations. The pandemic thus resulted in an unprecedented and sudden drop of transplant activity worldwide. Moreover, the best treatment strategy in infected patients was challenging. Both reduction of immunosuppression and use of targeted therapies aiming at counteracting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection were the 2 faces of the therapeutic armamentarium. Recent controlled studies have better delineated the basis of mitigating and management strategies to improve patients' outcome. Nevertheless, and given the persistence of circulating virus, evidence-based recommendations in SOT recipients remain unclear. The resumption of transplant activity should be tailored with careful selection of both donors and recipients. Transplant decision should be made on a case-by-case basis after thorough assessment of the risks and benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/mortality , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Organ Transplantation/methods , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Telemedicine
14.
Transplantation ; 105(1): 61-66, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933931

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has significantly upended solid organ transplant (SOT) practice around the world. Early reports confirmed the heavy burden of COVID-19 in SOT recipients with mortality rates reaching up to 35%. Because most transplant recipients harbored multiple comorbidities known to be associated with a severe course of COVID-19, the true impact of immunosuppression by itself remained an unsolved issue. Transplant societies have initially recommended to postpone nonurgent renal transplantations, while trying to maintain life-saving transplant programs, such as heart, lung, and liver transplantations. The pandemic thus resulted in an unprecedented and sudden drop of transplant activity worldwide. Moreover, the best treatment strategy in infected patients was challenging. Both reduction of immunosuppression and use of targeted therapies aiming at counteracting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection were the 2 faces of the therapeutic armamentarium. Recent controlled studies have better delineated the basis of mitigating and management strategies to improve patients' outcome. Nevertheless, and given the persistence of circulating virus, evidence-based recommendations in SOT recipients remain unclear. The resumption of transplant activity should be tailored with careful selection of both donors and recipients. Transplant decision should be made on a case-by-case basis after thorough assessment of the risks and benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/mortality , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Organ Transplantation/methods , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Telemedicine
16.
Am J Transplant ; 20(9): 2332-2336, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760098

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is impacting transplant programs around the world, and, as the center of the pandemic shifts to the United States, we have to prepare to make decisions about which patients to transplant during times of constrained resources. In this paper, we discuss how to transition from the traditional justice versus utility consideration in organ allocation to a more nuanced allocation scheme based on ethical values that drive decisions in times of absolute scarcity. We recognize that many decisions are made based on the practical limitations that transplant programs face, especially at the extremes. As programs make the transition from a standard approach to a resource-constrained approach to transplantation, we utilize a framework for ethical decisions in settings of absolutely scarce resources to help guide programs in deciding which patients to transplant, which donors to accept, how to minimize risk, and how to ensure the best utilization of transplant team members.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Resources/statistics & numerical data , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Resource Allocation/methods , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Selection , SARS-CoV-2
17.
CMAJ ; 192(44): E1347-E1356, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To mitigate the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), jurisdictions worldwide ramped down nonemergent surgeries, creating a global surgical backlog. We sought to estimate the size of the nonemergent surgical backlog during COVID-19 in Ontario, Canada, and the time and resources required to clear the backlog. METHODS: We used 6 Ontario or Canadian population administrative sources to obtain data covering part or all of the period between Jan. 1, 2017, and June 13, 2020, on historical volumes and operating room throughput distributions by surgery type and region, and lengths of stay in ward and intensive care unit (ICU) beds. We used time series forecasting, queuing models and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to estimate the size of the backlog and clearance time for a +10% (+1 day per week at 50% capacity) surge scenario. RESULTS: Between Mar. 15 and June 13, 2020, the estimated backlog in Ontario was 148 364 surgeries (95% prediction interval 124 508-174 589), an average weekly increase of 11 413 surgeries. Estimated backlog clearance time is 84 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 46-145), with an estimated weekly throughput of 717 patients (95% CI 326-1367) requiring 719 operating room hours (95% CI 431-1038), 265 ward beds (95% CI 87-678) and 9 ICU beds (95% CI 4-20) per week. INTERPRETATION: The magnitude of the surgical backlog from COVID-19 raises serious implications for the recovery phase in Ontario. Our framework for modelling surgical backlog recovery can be adapted to other jurisdictions, using local data to assist with planning.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Neoplasms/surgery , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Ontario , Operating Rooms/supply & distribution , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
19.
Transplant Proc ; 52(9): 2578-2583, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has unfavorably influenced solid organ donation activity. AIM: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on transplantation in the North Italy Transplant program (NITp). MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study included all consecutive potential deceased donors proposed in the NITp in 6 weeks after February 21, 2020 (period A) compared to all potential donors during the same time frame of the previous years (period B) and all potential donors 6 weeks before February 20, 2020 (period C). RESULTS: Fifty-eight deceased donors were proposed during period A, 95 were proposed during period B, and 128 were proposed during period C. After the evaluation process, 32 of 58 (55.2%), 60 of 95 (63.2%), and 79 of 128 (61.7%) donors were used for organ donation in periods A, B, and C, respectively (P value = .595). We observed a 47% donation reduction in period A compared to period B and a 60% reduction compared to period C. There was a reduction of 44% and 59% in transplantation comparing period A with period B and period C, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed an important reduction of donations and transplants during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Am J Transplant ; 20(11): 3081-3088, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641124

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a rapidly changing circumstance with dramatic policy changes and universal efforts to deal with the initial crisis and minimize its consequences. To identify changes to organ donation and transplantation during this time, an anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 19 select organ procurement organizations (OPOs) throughout the United States comparing 90-day activity during March-May 2020 and March-May 2019. Seventeen OPOs responded to the survey (response rate of 89.5%). Organ authorization decreased by 11% during the current pandemic (n = 1379 vs n = 1552, P = .0001). Organ recovery for transplantation fell by 17% (P = .0001) with a further 18% decrease in the number of organs transplanted (P = .0001). Donor cause of death demonstrated a 4.5% decline in trauma but a 35% increase in substance abuse cases during the COVID-19 period. All OPOs reported significant modifications in response to the pandemic, limiting the onsite presence of staff and transitioning to telephonic approaches for donor family correspondence. Organ donation during the current climate has seen significant changes and the long-term implications of such shifts remain unclear. These trends during the COVID-19 era warrant further investigation to address unmet needs, plan for a proportionate response to the virus and mitigate the collateral impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors/supply & distribution , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration , Humans , Puerto Rico/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
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