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1.
J Forensic Nurs ; 17(1): 61-64, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722672

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Standard operating procedures drive everyday practice within any organization, including those within a forensic setting. In the event of unusual circumstances, organizations must respond rapidly to address the impact on operations while ensuring that the quality and safety outcomes of routine services are not affected. This case study illustrates how standard operating procedures can be newly developed or modified, and rapidly deployed and quickly revised, to address unusual circumstances. The response to the COVID-19 pandemic is used as an example in this case report.


Subject(s)
Forensic Sciences/organization & administration , Organizational Case Studies , Organizational Policy , Quality Control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Texas/epidemiology
2.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 226-233, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643027

ABSTRACT

For more than 30 years, the network of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) has worked with local communities and partners to implement and evaluate public health interventions and policies for the prevention of disease and promotion of health. The COVID-19 pandemic tested the PRC network's ability to rapidly respond to multiple, simultaneous public health crises. On April 28, 2020, to assess the network's engagement with activities undertaken in response to the early phase of the pandemic, PRC network leadership distributed an online survey to the directors of 34 currently or formerly funded PRCs, asking them to report their PRCs' engagement with predetermined activities across 9 topical areas and provide case studies exemplifying that engagement. We received responses from 24 PRCs, all of which reported engagement with at least 1 of the 9 topical areas (mean, 5). The topical areas with which the greatest number of PRCs reported engagement were support of frontline agencies (21 of 24, 88%) and support of activities related to health care (21 of 24, 88%). The mean number of activities with which PRCs reported engagement was 11. The PRCs provided more than 90 case studies exemplifying their work. The results of the survey indicated that the PRCs mobilized their personnel and resources to support the COVID-19 response in less than 6 weeks. We posit that the speed of this response was due, in part, to the broad and diverse expertise of PRC personnel and long-standing partnerships between PRCs and the communities in which they work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Participation , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Public Health , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Organizational Case Studies , Preventive Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
3.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 208-212, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582750

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created unprecedented strain on the personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chain. Given the dearth of PPE and consequences for transmission, GetMePPE Chicago (GMPC) developed a PPE allocation framework and system, distributing 886 900 units to 274 institutions from March 2020 to July 2021 to address PPE needs. As the pandemic evolved, GMPC made difficult decisions about (1) building reserve inventory (to balance present and future, potentially higher clinical acuity, needs), (2) donating to other states/out-of-state organizations, and (3) receiving donations from other states. In this case study, we detail both GMPC's experience in making these decisions and the ethical frameworks that guided these decisions. We also reflect on lessons learned and suggest which values may have been in conflict (eg, maximizing benefits vs duty to mission, defined in the context of PPE allocation) in each circumstance, which values were prioritized, and when that prioritization would change. Such guidance can promote a values-based approach to key issues concerning distribution of PPE and other scarce medical resources in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and related future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organizational Case Studies , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Resource Allocation/ethics , Chicago , Decision Making, Organizational , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Volunteers
4.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501265

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: New South Wales (NSW) correctional system houses 30% of prisoners in Australia and at this time has only had a single documented case of COVID-19 amongst its prisoner population. The coordinated response by Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (The Network) undertaken with the support of NSW Ministry of Health, in partnership with Corrective Services NSW (CSNSW), Youth Justice and private jails has ensured that the NSW correctional system has remained otherwise COVID-free. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A research study of how a range of partners which support the operations of NSW Correctional System developed an effective approach for the prevention a COVID-19 epidemic amongst its inmates. FINDINGS: Establishment of effective partnerships, early coordination of representatives from all aspects of the NSW correctional system, limited access to the correctional environment, reduced prison population and strict isolation of all new receptions have all contributed to maintaining this COVID-free status despite other NSW settings with similar risk profiles, such as aged care facilities and cruise ship arrivals, experiencing serious outbreaks. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Although Australia/New Zealand context of suppressed community infection rates for COVID-19 (which are approaching elimination in some jurisdictions) is in contrast to the situation in other parts of the world, the principles described in this paper will be useful to most other correctional systems. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Modelling was used to underline our approach and reinforced the veracity of following this approach. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The Network and CSNSW has been able to mount an effective, integrated response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has been sustainable through the first peak of COVID-19 cases. This case study catalogues the process of developing this response and details each intervention implemented with inventive use of tables to demonstrate the impact of the range of interventions used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Prisons/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New South Wales/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 497-502, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to 2020, library orientation for first-year medical students at Weill Cornell Medicine took the form of an on-site treasure hunt competition. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the orientation for the MD class of 2024 was shifted to an all-virtual format. This shift mandated a full redesign of the library orientation. CASE PRESENTATION: The Samuel J. Wood Library sought to preserve the excitement and fun of the treasure hunt in the new virtual format. The competition was redesigned as a Zoom meeting using breakout rooms, with library faculty and staff serving as team facilitators. Tasks were rewritten, shifting the focus from the library's physical spaces to its virtual services and online resources. The redesigned orientation was evaluated using two data sources: a postsession survey of student participants and a debriefing of the library employees who participated. Student evaluations were positive, while the faculty and staff provided numerous suggestions for improving future virtual orientations. CONCLUSIONS: A successful virtual library orientation requires careful preparation, including testing the competition tasks, full rehearsal with library facilitators, and a thoughtful approach to technology and logistics. We have chosen to share the materials we developed for other academic health sciences libraries that may wish to take a similar approach to their own virtual orientations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Organizational Case Studies , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New York , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Young Adult
6.
Healthc Q ; 24(2): 33-37, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323455

ABSTRACT

Physician engagement is an important factor in improving care quality and patient safety, but engaging physicians is not easy. Winston Churchill's famous assertion about never wasting a crisis has defined the approach taken by many leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper describes three case studies of successful physician engagement across the continuum of acute care, chronic care and primary care settings during the pandemic. These examples offer insights on physician engagement within unique settings by leveraging intrinsic motivators and Spurgeon's model of medical engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Physicians/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Primary Health Care/organization & administration
7.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 36(S1): 58-70, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318703

ABSTRACT

While policy-makers in many jurisdictions are paying increasing attention to health workforce issues, human resources remain at best only partially aligned with population health needs. This paper explores the governance of human resources during the pandemic, looking at the Quebec health system as a revelatory case. We identify three issues related to health human resource (HHR) policies: working conditions, recognition at work and scope of practice. We empirically probe these issues based on an analysis of popular media, policy reports and participant observation by the lead authors in various forums and research projects. Using an integrated model of HHR, we identify major vulnerabilities in this domain. Persistent labour shortages, endemic deficiencies in working environments and inequity across occupational categories limit the ability to address critical HHR issues. We propose three ways to eliminate HHR vulnerabilities: reorganize work through participatory initiatives, implement joint policy making to rebalance power across the health workforce, and invest in the development of capacities at all system levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Health Workforce/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics , Quebec , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(3)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304236

ABSTRACT

The globe is gripped by the COVID-19 pandemic. Mass population vaccination is seen as the solution. As vaccines become available, governments aim to deploy them as rapidly as possible. It is important, therefore, that the efficiency of vaccination processes is optimal.Operations management is concerned with improving processes and comprises systematic approaches such as Lean. Lean focuses explicitly on process efficiency through the elimination of non-value adding steps to optimise processes for those who use and depend on them.Technology-enhanced learning can be a strategy to build improvement capability at scale. A massive online programme to build capability in Lean has been developed by the regulator of England's National Health Service. Beta testing of this programme has been used by some test sites to refine their COVID-19 vaccination processes. The paper presents a case example of massive online learning supporting the use of Lean in the day-to-day operations management of COVID-19 vaccine processes.The case example illustrates the challenges that vaccination processes may present and the need for responsive and effective operations management. Building capability to respond rapidly and systematically in dynamic situations to optimise flow, safety and patient experience may be beneficial.Given the national imperative to achieve mass vaccination as rapidly as possible, systematic improvement methods such as Lean may have a contribution to make. Massive online programmes, such as that described here, may help with this effort by achieving timely knowledge transfer at large scale.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Capacity Building/methods , Mass Vaccination/organization & administration , England , Humans , Organizational Case Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
9.
Phys Ther ; 101(9)2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281870

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this case report is to describe the challenges that COVID-19 presented for therapists in a pediatric hospital and the response to these challenges. METHODS: The case report setting is a physical therapy and occupational therapy department (department) of an academic pediatric medical center that provides a range of health care services for children and youth. Challenges that COVID-19 presented to the department included (1) managing safety concerns for patients, their families, and staff; (2) continuing to provide high-quality therapy services within state-mandated restrictions; (3) triaging patients; and (4) keeping clinicians employed and working productively. RESULTS: The department therapists responded to these challenges by (1) increasing communication huddles; (2) developing procedures for staffing and triaging of patients; (3) developing procedures for telehealth therapy services; and (4) designing a remote work program for all department employees. The number of patients and staff on site were reduced by initiating telehealth services, triaging patients, and developing a remote work plan. Communication huddles, department meetings, and supervision meetings were converted to virtual meetings. Staffing rates, patient-care productivity, and department project work were maintained. CONCLUSION: In response to COVID-19, the department developed new protocols and provided information about the protocols, which might be helpful for other pediatric hospitals or outpatient settings when planning for future pandemics or other issues that challenge the ability to provide usual care. Increasing the frequency of verbal and written communication on operational topics is recommended. Primary sources of information from national organizations (eg, the American Physical Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Association) can assist with determining the scope of practice and code of conduct during a pandemic. IMPACT: COVID-19 posed challenges to operations and delivery of patient care. Although this case report is specific to COVID-19, principles applied and lessons learned from this experience can be applied to other emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Occupational Therapy Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Physical Therapy Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Rehabilitation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Massachusetts , Organizational Case Studies , Patient Selection , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
10.
HERD ; 14(3): 34-48, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This case study examines the implementation of inpatient telemedicine in COVID-19 intensive care units (ICUs) and explores the impact of shifting forms of visibility on the management of the unit, staff collaboration, and patient care. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 crisis drove healthcare institutions to rapidly develop new models of care based on integrating digital technologies for remote care with transformations in the hospital-built environment. The Sheba Medical Center in Israel created COVID-19 ICUs in an underground structure with an open-ward layout and telemedicine control rooms to remotely supervise, communicate, and support the operations in the contaminated zones. One unit had a physical visual connection between the control room and the contaminated zone through a window, while the other had only a virtual connection with digital technologies. METHODS: The findings are based on semistructured interviews with Sheba medical staff, telemedicine companies, and the architectural design team and observations at the COVID-19 units during March-August 2020. RESULTS: The case study illustrates the implications of virtual and physical visibility on the management of the unit, staff collaboration, and patient care. It demonstrates the correlations between patterns of visibility and the users' sense of control, orientation in space, teamwork, safety, quality of care, and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: The case study demonstrates the limitations of current telemedicine technologies that were not designed for inpatient care to account for the spatial perception of the unit and the dynamic use of the space. It presents the potential of a hybrid model that balances virtual and physical forms of visibility and suggests directions for future research and development of inpatient telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Facility Design and Construction/methods , Facility Design and Construction/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Israel , Organizational Case Studies , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration
11.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(2): 188-204, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221291

ABSTRACT

The UCLA Science Libraries improved upon our single service points by creating a team-based, tiered research assistance model to foster student employee skill development. This model was further developed to expand training for public services staff, enabling librarians and student research assistants to move beyond desk-based services. This multi-phased approach involved restructured training and the development of collaborative, tiered services. Librarians utilized train-the-trainer sessions, detailed documentation toolkits, and a robust outreach plan to ensure success. After initial implementation of this new model, librarians observed above average use of the service and excellent user feedback. Its versatility has also played a direct role in the successful transition from physical to virtual services in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Library Science/education , Models, Organizational , Humans , Inservice Training , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Program Development , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(2): 151-167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221290

ABSTRACT

Between 2018 and 2019, the librarians at the Strauss Health Sciences Library improved the efficiency and reach of their reference service by implementing four small-scale changes. These changes included revising the method of collecting statistics, creating FAQs, utilizing an appointment scheduler, and launching proactive chat. This case study will provide the background and research to support these changes, details on how the changes were implemented using Springshare tools, as well as the results and implications. Finally, the librarians will share their lessons learned along with recommendations for institutions interested in adopting similar changes.


Subject(s)
Information Dissemination/methods , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Colorado , Humans , Organizational Case Studies
13.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 64(6): 643-655, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196914

ABSTRACT

Older adults' relationship to information and communications technology (ICT) is often discussed in terms of the digital divide or technology gap. Older persons, those 65 years of age and older, are seen as excluded or marginally represented in the digital sphere, even though data show their use of technology is increasing. Challenges in technology adoption and models for improving digital inclusion are both well-known, but the COVID pandemic and its general shift to digital life have created a critical need to increase digital inclusion of older persons. A case study of Older Adults Technology Services (OATS) and the organization's migration from in-person to virtual programming is used as an example of reframing the way the relationship of older adults to technology is seen in the field and in practice. Policy and programming implications of this new view of technology are discussed in the conclusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digital Technology/education , Interpersonal Relations , User-Computer Interface , Videoconferencing , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Empowerment , Female , Humans , Male , Organizational Case Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(2): 120-127, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183083

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of COVID-19 among nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and other long-term care facilities in the United States have had devastating effects on residents. Restrictions such as banning visitors, sequestering residents, and testing health care staff have been implemented to mitigate the spread of the virus. However, consequences include a decline in mental and physical health, decompensation, and a sense of hopelessness among residents. We present and explore a case study at an assisted living facility addressing the ethical issues in balancing the management of the community versus the resident's right to autonomy and self-determination. A team of palliative care experts was brought into assisted living facilities to manage patients, care for well residents, and provide input in advance care planning and symptom management. The principles of self-determination and autonomy, stewardship, and distributive justice were explored. The use of nursing skills in triage and assessment, principles in public health, and the 8 domains of palliative care provided a comprehensive framework for structuring emergency operations. Palliative interventions and the role of palliative care nurses played an integral part in addressing ethical challenges in the containment of the virus and the deleterious effects of social isolation among the elderly.


Subject(s)
Assisted Living Facilities/ethics , COVID-19/nursing , Disease Outbreaks , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing/ethics , Public Health/ethics , Aged , Assisted Living Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Long-Term Care/ethics , Organizational Case Studies , United States/epidemiology
15.
Emerg Radiol ; 28(4): 705-711, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168987

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the activity of Emergency Departments worldwide changed dramatically, focusing on diagnosis and care of the Sars-Cov-2 associated disease. These major changes also involved the activity of the Emergency Radiology Department (ERD). This study aimed to analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on imaging studies, both in terms of the amount, frequency and subspecialty of different imaging modalities requested to the ERD of the Maggiore della Carità Hospital in Novara (Italy). METHODS: To this end, our observational study took into account the imaging studies requested by the emergency department during three-time spans. These were defined as phase 0 (pre-pandemic), phase 1 (pandemic peak with complete lockdown) and phase 2 (post-pandemic peak with partial lifting of restrictive measures), as derived from Italian urgent decrees by the President of the Council of Ministers (DPCM) which established the duration and entity of the lockdown measures throughout the pandemic. The dataset was processed and then compared with Pearson's chi-squared test. RESULTS: During the pandemic peak, our data showed a significant drop in the total number of studies requested and a significant rise in computed tomography (CT) studies. In particular, a statistically significant increase in chest CT studies was found, probably due to the high sensitivity of this imaging method in identifying pulmonary involvement during respiratory tract infection of possible viral etiology (SARS-Cov-2). Moreover, we observed a statistically significant decrease of X-ray (XR) and ultrasound (US) studies during phase 1 compared to phase 0 and phase 2 probably due to a reduction in the numbers of ER visits for minor traumas given the mobility restrictions and people hesitancy in visiting the ER due to fear of contagion. CONCLUSIONS: We can conclude that the activity of the ERD was heavily impacted by the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic. Further studies will be needed to estimate the impact of the pandemic on public health in terms of excess mortality related to delayed diagnosis and care of non-COVID diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diagnostic Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospital Planning , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211000235, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To characterize the experience of converting a geriatrics clinic to telehealth visits in early stages of a pandemic. DESIGN: An organizational case study with mixed methods evaluation from the first 8 weeks of converting a geriatrics clinic from in-person visits to video and telephone visits. SETTING: Veteran's Health Administration in Northern California Participants Community-dwelling older Veterans receiving care at VA Palo Alto Geriatrics clinic. Veterans had a mean age of 85.7 (SD = 6.8) and 72.1% had cognitive impairment. INTERVENTION: Veterans with face-to-face appointments were converted to video or telephone visits to mitigate exposure to community spread of COVID-19. MEASUREMENTS: Thirty-two patient evaluations and 80 clinician feedback evaluations were completed. This provided information on satisfaction, care access during pandemic, and travel and time savings. RESULTS: Of the 62 scheduled appointments, 43 virtual visits (69.4%) were conducted. Twenty-six (60.5%) visits were conducted via video, 17 (39.5%) by telephone. Virtual visits saved patients an average of 118.6 minutes each. Patients and providers had similar, positive perceptions about telehealth to in-person visit comparison, limiting exposure, and visit satisfaction. After the telehealth appointment, patients indicated greater comfort with using virtual visits in the future. Thirty-one evaluations included comments for qualitative analysis. We identified 3 main themes of technology set-up and usability, satisfaction with visit, and clinical assessment and communication. CONCLUSION: During a pandemic that has limited the ability to safely conduct inperson services, virtual formats offer a feasible and acceptable alternative for clinically-complex older patients. Despite potential barriers and additional effort required for telehealth visits, patients expressed willingness to utilize this format. Patients and providers reported high satisfaction, particularly with the ability to access care similar to in-person while staying safe. Investing in telehealth services during a pandemic ensures that vulnerable older patients can access care while maintaining social distancing, an important safety measure.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Geriatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Veterans Health Services/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Middle Aged , Organizational Case Studies , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Qualitative Research , Telephone , Videoconferencing
17.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132721

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: New South Wales (NSW) correctional system houses 30% of prisoners in Australia and at this time has only had a single documented case of COVID-19 amongst its prisoner population. The coordinated response by Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (The Network) undertaken with the support of NSW Ministry of Health, in partnership with Corrective Services NSW (CSNSW), Youth Justice and private jails has ensured that the NSW correctional system has remained otherwise COVID-free. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A research study of how a range of partners which support the operations of NSW Correctional System developed an effective approach for the prevention a COVID-19 epidemic amongst its inmates. FINDINGS: Establishment of effective partnerships, early coordination of representatives from all aspects of the NSW correctional system, limited access to the correctional environment, reduced prison population and strict isolation of all new receptions have all contributed to maintaining this COVID-free status despite other NSW settings with similar risk profiles, such as aged care facilities and cruise ship arrivals, experiencing serious outbreaks. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Although Australia/New Zealand context of suppressed community infection rates for COVID-19 (which are approaching elimination in some jurisdictions) is in contrast to the situation in other parts of the world, the principles described in this paper will be useful to most other correctional systems. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Modelling was used to underline our approach and reinforced the veracity of following this approach. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The Network and CSNSW has been able to mount an effective, integrated response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has been sustainable through the first peak of COVID-19 cases. This case study catalogues the process of developing this response and details each intervention implemented with inventive use of tables to demonstrate the impact of the range of interventions used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Prisons/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New South Wales/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 28(7): 1555-1563, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132539

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The study sought to develop an in-depth understanding of how hospitals with a long history of health information technology (HIT) use have responded to the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic from an HIT perspective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We undertook interviews with 44 healthcare professionals with a background in informatics from 6 hospitals internationally. Interviews were informed by a topic guide and were conducted via videoconferencing software. Thematic analysis was employed to develop a coding framework and identify emerging themes. RESULTS: Three themes and 6 subthemes were identified. HITs were employed to manage time and resources during a surge in patient numbers through fast-tracked governance procedures, and the creation of real-time bed capacity tracking within electronic health records. Improving the integration of different hospital systems was identified as important across sites. The use of hard-stop alerts and order sets were perceived as being effective at helping to respond to potential medication shortages and selecting available drug treatments. Utilizing information from multiple data sources to develop alerts facilitated treatment. Finally, the upscaling/optimization of telehealth and remote working capabilities was used to reduce the risk of nosocomial infection within hospitals. DISCUSSION: A number of the HIT-related changes implemented at these sites were perceived to have facilitated more effective patient treatment and management of resources. Informaticians generally felt more valued by hospital management as a result. CONCLUSIONS: Improving integration between data systems, utilizing specialized alerts, and expanding telehealth represent strategies that hospitals should consider when using HIT for delivering hospital care in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Administration , Hospital Information Systems/organization & administration , Medical Informatics , Medical Records Systems, Computerized , Patient Care Management , Attitude of Health Personnel , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Infection Control , Interviews as Topic , Organizational Case Studies , Personnel, Hospital , Telemedicine , United Kingdom , United States
19.
Perm J ; 25: 1, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106388

ABSTRACT

None: Telehealth has been a well-established system of care delivery at Kaiser Permanente Northwest Pediatric Gastroenterology since before the COVID-19 era, where 54% of our completed pediatric gastroenterology encounters in the past year were virtual visits. Although it was previously limited in its use across the majority of health care in the US, telehealth is now a widely accepted system in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this unprecedented rapid expansion of telehealth within both new and established telehealth systems is not without challenges or quality concerns. In this report, we present our single-center experience from the past year where virtual care was already an integral part of our clinical practice in pediatric gastroenterology and review satisfaction data and quality measures from the COVID-19 era where our existing telehealth system expanded to nearly exclusive virtual care.


Subject(s)
Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Child , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Organizational Case Studies , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
20.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(3): e24795, 2021 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102455

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 presented great challenges for not only those in the field of health care but also those undergoing medical training. The burden on health care services worldwide has limited the educational opportunities available for medical students due to social distancing requirements. OBJECTIVE: In this paper, we describe a strategy that combines telehealth and medical training to mitigate the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A toll-free telescreening service, Telecoronavirus, began operations in March 2020. This service was operated remotely by supervised medical students and was offered across all 417 municipalities (14.8 million inhabitants) in the Brazilian state of Bahia. Students recorded clinical and sociodemographic data by using a web-based application that was simultaneously accessed by medical volunteers for supervision purposes, as well as by state health authorities who conducted epidemiological surveillance and health management efforts. In parallel, students received up-to-date scientific information about COVID-19 via short educational videos prepared by professors. A continuously updated triage algorithm was conceived to provide consistent service. RESULTS: The program operated for approximately 4 months, engaging 1396 medical students and 133 physicians. In total, 111,965 individuals residing in 343 municipalities used this service. Almost 70,000 individuals were advised to stay at home, and they received guidance to avoid disease transmission, potentially contributing to localized reductions in the spread of COVID-19. Additionally, the program promoted citizenship education for medical students, who were engaged in a real-life opportunity to fight the pandemic within their own communities. The objectives of the education, organization, and assistance domains of the Telecoronavirus program were successfully achieved according to the results of a web-based post-project survey that assessed physicians' and students' perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: In a prolonged pandemic scenario, a combination of remote tools and medical supervision via telehealth services may constitute a useful strategy for maintaining social distancing measures while preserving some practical aspects of medical education. A low-cost tool such as the Telecoronavirus program could be especially valuable in resource-limited health care scenarios, in addition to offering support for epidemiological surveillance actions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Brazil/epidemiology , Humans , Learning , Organizational Case Studies , Social Participation
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