Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 66
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(12): 781-782, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599879

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has raised awareness of the importance of safety and the issue of risk management as a social and global dimension. From here on it should start an effort for the development and affirmation of a culture of risk in healthcare organizations as a propensity to "preparedness" and anticipation of the crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Organizations , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Soins ; 66(861): 32-35, 2021 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569063

ABSTRACT

Resuscitation units, and the care practices they implement, require specific procedures and technologies, as well as particular and distinct knowledge, skills and human qualities within the care setting. Already facing tensions related to the challenges and vital issues of their mission, these resuscitation units have been destabilised by the influx of patients and the unprecedented complexity of the Covid-19 pandemic, which has forced them to rethink their organisation to a large extent and to envisage the future differently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Forecasting , Humans , Organizations , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512295

ABSTRACT

The most recent version of the job demands-resources (JD-R) theory proposes that demanding working conditions and employee strain form a self-perpetuating loss cycle. By acknowledging that such cycles are detrimental for both employees and organizations, the present study aimed to contribute to enhancing the current scarce understanding regarding their explanatory mechanisms. For this purpose, it applied social cognitive theory to propose that occupational self-efficacy mediates the effects of two role stressors (i.e., role ambiguity and role conflict) on employee mental health complaints and vice versa. The hypothesized reciprocal mediation effects were tested using a three-wave full panel research design and a dataset of 917 (NT1 = 513, NT1+T2 = 122, NT1+T3 = 70, NT1+T2+T3 = 212) Croatian employees working in heterogeneous private sector industries. The results demonstrated that role conflict, but not role ambiguity, undermined employees' beliefs in their capabilities to successfully master their jobs which, in turn, led them to experience more mental health complaints over time. Contrary to expectations, poor mental health did not lead to diminished efficacy beliefs nor, in turn, more job demands over time. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated an additional mechanism in the job demands-strain relationship and, at the same time, shed new light on the role of personal resources within the JD-R theory. Accounting for the malleable nature of employee efficacy beliefs, the study proposes several ways in which organizations can enhance occupational self-efficacy and thereby curb the causal chain linking job demands and employee strain reactions.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Self Efficacy , Job Satisfaction , Mental Health , Organizations
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512292

ABSTRACT

Activity-based workplaces (ABW) have been implemented in many organizations to offer office flexibility and decrease facility costs. Evaluations of the ABW implementation process are rare. The study aimed to examine the ABW relocation process of two offices in a Swedish governmental agency and to explore factors that influence the implementation process and satisfaction with it. Qualitative or quantitative data were collected on process variables (context, recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, satisfaction), barriers and facilitators to the process were explored in focus group interviews, and immediate outcomes (perceived knowledge, understanding office rules, satisfying information and support) were measured by questionnaire before and after the relocation. The evaluation showed that recruitment was unsatisfactory and reach insufficient-and participation in activities was thus low for both offices. However, intended changes improved. Unclear aims of ABW, lack of manager support and, lack of communication were some of the reported barriers to participation, while a well-planned process, work groups, and program activities were facilitators. Thus, to increase satisfaction with the relocation, our results suggest that recruitment should be thoroughly planned, taking these factors into account to increase participation. This knowledge may be useful for planning and designing successful ABW relocations and evaluations.


Subject(s)
Personal Satisfaction , Workplace , Focus Groups , Organizations , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Emerg Manag ; 19(7): 109-126, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497656

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated emergency management offices and organizations across Canada to activate their Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in a virtual capacity due to government restrictions limiting in-person activities and with the goal of reducing the spread of the virus. The aim of this exploratory research paper is to document the personal experiences of Canadian emergency management professionals working in a Virtual EOC (VEOC) environment during the COVID-19 response, including challenges and benefits they experienced, as well as lessons identified. Based on a sample of 81 emergency management professionals and using an inductive coding approach, the survey results illustrate both technological and nontechnological challenges and benefits. The findings highlight the need to incorporate three main elements into VEOC planning and operations: technology, processes, and people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Canada , Humans , Organizations , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(5): 1034-1039, 2021 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478955

ABSTRACT

The article considers, on the basis of application of modern information analytical systems, the sequential stages of analysis and evaluation of indices of resource support of medical organizations and technological process of medical care provision. The results of the study permit to discover particular patterns of the course of disease in different gender and age groups,in terms of clinical manifestations and results of instrumental and diagnostic tests. The dependence of results and outcomes of treatment on set and quality of resources of medical organizations is established. The prognostic indices of functioning of medical organization under various alternatives of patients' flows organization as associated with hospitalization level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Organizations , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMC Med Ethics ; 22(1): 136, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid data sharing can maximize the utility of data. In epidemics and pandemics like Zika, Ebola, and COVID-19, the case for such practices seems especially urgent and warranted. Yet rapidly sharing data widely has previously generated significant concerns related to equity. The continued lack of understanding and guidance on equitable data sharing raises the following questions: Should data sharing in epidemics and pandemics primarily advance utility, or should it advance equity as well? If so, what norms comprise equitable data sharing in epidemics and pandemics? Do these norms address the equity-related concerns raised by researchers, data providers, and other stakeholders? What tensions must be balanced between equity and other values? METHODS: To explore these questions, we undertook a systematic scoping review of the literature on data sharing in epidemics and pandemics and thematically analyzed identified literature for its discussion of ethical values, norms, concerns, and tensions, with a particular (but not exclusive) emphasis on equity. We wanted to both understand how equity in data sharing is being conceptualized and draw out other important values and norms for data sharing in epidemics and pandemics. RESULTS: We found that values of utility, equity, solidarity, and reciprocity were described, and we report their associated norms, including researcher recognition; rapid, real-time sharing; capacity development; and fair benefits to data generators, data providers, and source countries. The value of utility and its associated norms were discussed substantially more than others. Tensions between utility norms (e.g., rapid, real-time sharing) and equity norms (e.g., researcher recognition, equitable access) were raised. CONCLUSIONS: This study found support for equity being advanced by data sharing in epidemics and pandemics. However, norms for equitable data sharing in epidemics and pandemics require further development, particularly in relation to power sharing and participatory approaches prioritizing inclusion. Addressing structural inequities in the wider global health landscape is also needed to achieve equitable data sharing in epidemics and pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Humans , Information Dissemination , Organizations , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Zika Virus Infection/epidemiology
9.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e039246, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare is increasingly challenged to meet the demands of user involvement and knowledge mobilisation required by the 21st-century patient-centred and knowledge-based economies. Innovations are needed to reduce problematic barriers to knowledge exchange and improve collaborative problem solving. Living labs, as open knowledge systems, have the potential to address these gaps but are underexplored in healthcare. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct the first systematic review of living labs across healthcare contexts. We will comprehensively search the following online databases from inception to 31 December 2020: Scopus, the Cochrane Library (Wiley), Medline (OVID), Embase (OVID), Web of Science, PsycINFO (OVID) and EBSCOhost databases including Academic Search Complete, Business Source Premier, Canadian Reference Centre, CINAHL, MasterFILE Premier, SPORTDiscus, Library & Information Science Source, Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, AgeLine, EconLit, Art Full Text, Women's Studies International and Social Work Abstracts. We will search for grey literature using Google advanced techniques and books/book chapters through scholarly and bibliographical databases. We will use a dual-reviewer, two-step selection process with pre-established inclusion criteria and limit to English language publications. Empirical studies of any design examining living lab development, implementation or evaluation in health or healthcare will be included. We will use the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) for methodological quality appraisal and Covidence software for review management, and we will extract data on pre-established variables such as lab context and technological platforms. We will create evidence tables and analyse across variables such as focal aim and achievement of living lab principles, such as the use of cocreation and multimethod approaches. We will tabulate data for descriptive reporting and narrative synthesis to identify current applications, approaches and promising areas for living lab development across health contexts. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was not required for this review. This review will inform research into living labs in health environments, including guidance for a living lab in paediatric rehabilitation. Academic publications shared through collaborative networks and social media channels will provide substantive knowledge to the growing tech-health development sector and to researchers, practitioners and organisations seeking enhanced patient/stakeholder engagement and innovations in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020175275.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Canada , Child , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Organizations , Review Literature as Topic
10.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(6): 332-335, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448125

ABSTRACT

Traditional models of health leadership are characterized by top-down structures dependent on hierarchy - which emerged historically from military models. With supporting evidence, many of today's leaders are now working hard to shift their organizations to models of empowered teams and servant leadership with the hopes of inciting a broader cultural shift. The concern is that these early signs of progress could unravel due to the many challenges now exacerbated by COVID-19 and its implications. One such example is fostering respect and civility (i.e. the pillars of empowerment and servant leadership) which is placed at risk during times of change and crisis - more so during a pandemic when command-and-control structures are deemed necessary. The evolution of modern health leadership must be implemented with plans for mitigating related risks. Ultimately, the behaviours that are tolerated during times of stress are what become the value system of any organization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Humans , Organizations , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Lancet ; 398(10309): 1407-1416, 2021 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine effectiveness studies have not differentiated the effect of the delta (B.1.617.2) variant and potential waning immunity in observed reductions in effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infections. We aimed to evaluate overall and variant-specific effectiveness of BNT162b2 (tozinameran, Pfizer-BioNTech) against SARS-CoV-2 infections and COVID-19-related hospital admissions by time since vaccination among members of a large US health-care system. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we analysed electronic health records of individuals (≥12 years) who were members of the health-care organisation Kaiser Permanente Southern California (CA, USA), to assess BNT162b2 vaccine effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infections and COVID-19-related hospital admissions for up to 6 months. Participants were required to have 1 year or more previous membership of the organisation. Outcomes comprised SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive tests and COVID-19-related hospital admissions. Effectiveness calculations were based on hazard ratios from adjusted Cox models. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04848584. FINDINGS: Between Dec 14, 2020, and Aug 8, 2021, of 4 920 549 individuals assessed for eligibility, we included 3 436 957 (median age 45 years [IQR 29-61]; 1 799 395 [52·4%] female and 1 637 394 [47·6%] male). For fully vaccinated individuals, effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infections was 73% (95% CI 72-74) and against COVID-19-related hospital admissions was 90% (89-92). Effectiveness against infections declined from 88% (95% CI 86-89) during the first month after full vaccination to 47% (43-51) after 5 months. Among sequenced infections, vaccine effectiveness against infections of the delta variant was high during the first month after full vaccination (93% [95% CI 85-97]) but declined to 53% [39-65] after 4 months. Effectiveness against other (non-delta) variants the first month after full vaccination was also high at 97% (95% CI 95-99), but waned to 67% (45-80) at 4-5 months. Vaccine effectiveness against hospital admissions for infections with the delta variant for all ages was high overall (93% [95% CI 84-96]) up to 6 months. INTERPRETATION: Our results provide support for high effectiveness of BNT162b2 against hospital admissions up until around 6 months after being fully vaccinated, even in the face of widespread dissemination of the delta variant. Reduction in vaccine effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infections over time is probably primarily due to waning immunity with time rather than the delta variant escaping vaccine protection. FUNDING: Pfizer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizations , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , United States , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
12.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003744, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440980

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In South Africa, breastfeeding promotion is a national health priority. Regular perinatal home visits by community health workers (CHWs) have helped promote exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in underresourced settings. Innovative, digital approaches including mobile video content have also shown promise, especially as access to mobile technology increases among CHWs. We measured the effects of an animated, mobile video series, the Philani MObile Video Intervention for Exclusive breastfeeding (MOVIE), delivered by a cadre of CHWs ("mentor mothers"). METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a stratified, cluster-randomized controlled trial from November 2018 to March 2020 in Khayelitsha, South Africa. The trial was conducted in collaboration with the Philani Maternal Child Health and Nutrition Trust, a nongovernmental community health organization. We quantified the effect of the MOVIE intervention on EBF at 1 and 5 months (primary outcomes), and on other infant feeding practices and maternal knowledge (secondary outcomes). We randomized 1,502 pregnant women in 84 clusters 1:1 to 2 study arms. Participants' median age was 26 years, 36.9% had completed secondary school, and 18.3% were employed. Mentor mothers in the video intervention arm provided standard-of-care counseling plus the MOVIE intervention; mentor mothers in the control arm provided standard of care only. Within the causal impact evaluation, we nested a mixed-methods performance evaluation measuring mentor mothers' time use and eliciting their subjective experiences through in-depth interviews. At both points of follow-up, we observed no statistically significant differences between the video intervention and the control arm with regard to EBF rates and other infant feeding practices [EBF in the last 24 hours at 1 month: RR 0.93 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.01, P = 0.091); EBF in the last 24 hours at 5 months: RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.04, P = 0.152)]. We observed a small, but significant improvement in maternal knowledge at the 1-month follow-up, but not at the 5-month follow-up. The interpretation of the results from this causal impact evaluation changes when we consider the results of the nested mixed-methods performance evaluation. The mean time spent per home visit was similar across study arms, but the intervention group spent approximately 40% of their visit time viewing videos. The absence of difference in effects on primary and secondary endpoints implies that, for the same time investment, the video intervention was as effective as face-to-face counseling with a mentor mother. The videos were also highly valued by mentor mothers and participants. Study limitations include a high loss to follow-up at 5 months after premature termination of the trial due to the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in mentor mother service demarcations. CONCLUSIONS: This trial measured the effect of a video-based, mobile health (mHealth) intervention, delivered by CHWs during home visits in an underresourced setting. The videos replaced about two-fifths of CHWs' direct engagement time with participants in the intervention arm. The similar outcomes in the 2 study arms thus suggest that the videos were as effective as face-to-face counselling, when CHWs used them to replace a portion of that counselling. Where CHWs are scarce, mHealth video interventions could be a feasible and practical solution, supporting the delivery and scaling of community health promotion services. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study and its outcomes were registered at clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT03688217) on September 27, 2018.


Subject(s)
Audiovisual Aids , Breast Feeding , Community Health Services/methods , Community Health Workers , Counseling , Health Promotion/methods , House Calls , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Maternal-Child Health Services , Mentors , Mothers , Motion Pictures , Organizations , Pandemics , Pregnancy , South Africa , Videotape Recording
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403591

ABSTRACT

While the majority of the American public believe climate change is occurring and are worried, few are engaged in climate change action. In this study, we assessed factors associated with the level of willingness to engage in climate change actions using an online, longitudinal US study of adults. Climate change action outcomes included the level of willingness to post materials online, take political actions, talk with peers about climate change, and donate to or help an organization. Predictors included climate change attitudes, environmental attitudes, political ideology, political party affiliation, and demographic variables. Most (72%) of the 644 respondents only talked about climate change with peers a few times a year or less, though 65% were very or extremely worried about climate change. Many respondents indicated a willingness to do somewhat or a lot more, from 38% willing to talk to peers to 25% for willing to take political actions. In multinomial regression models, the Climate Change Concern scale was strongly and consistently associated with willingness to engage in climate change action. These findings indicate a need to both identify those who are willing to act and finding activities that fit with their interests and availability.


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Politics , Attitude , Organizations , United States
15.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) ; 23(3): 408-410, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402938
16.
Lab Anim (NY) ; 50(9): 229-231, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392897

Subject(s)
Organizations
18.
Nurs Manage ; 52(9): 36-40, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381043
19.
Mil Med ; 186(12 Suppl 2): 4-8, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381031

ABSTRACT

A new strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) emerged in 2020 changing the way the nation looked, worked and lived. In response to this unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic, the Army Nurse Corps (ANC) reexamined our capabies and agility to respond to a new and rapidly evolving environment. Maintaining the pivot to readiness, providing sustainable support and protecting our most valuable asset-our people-were and continues to be in the forefront of leaders' thoughts as we faced this invisible adversary. With every new challenge, lessons learned provide an opportunity to re-examine challenges and successes of the response to COVID-19. Organizational restructuring, balancing risks, expanding capabilities and educational platforms were reassessed and adjusted to fill the needs of the environment as they evolved. The year 2020 will stand throughout history as another example where our readiness, resilience, and flexibility as an Army Nurse Corps was tried and tested. We demonstrated our ability to adapt and overcome-displaying our willingness to stand up as part of the Army Medicine Team and face an unknown adversary to protect the nation we vowed to serve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , Organizations , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378395

ABSTRACT

This study tests organizational trust as the psychosocial mechanism that explains how healthy organizational practices and team resources predict multilevel performance in organizations and teams, respectively. In our methodology, we collect data in a sample of 890 employees from 177 teams and their immediate supervisors from 31 Spanish companies. Our results from the multilevel analysis show two independent processes predicting organizational performance (return on assets, ROA) and performance ratings by immediate supervisors, operating at the organizational and team levels, respectively. We have found evidence for a theoretical and functional quasi-isomorphism. First, based on social exchange theory, we found evidence for our prediction that when organizations implement healthy practices and teams provide resources, employees trust their top managers (vertical trust) and coworkers (horizontal trust) and try to reciprocate these benefits by improving their performance. Second, (relationships among) constructs are similar at different levels of analysis, which may inform HRM officers and managers about which type of practices and resources can help to enhance trust and improve performance in organizations. The present study contributes to the scarce research on the role of trust at collective (i.e., organizational and team) levels as a psychological mechanism that explains how organizational practices and team resources are linked to organizational performance.


Subject(s)
Organizational Culture , Trust , Multilevel Analysis , Organizations
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...