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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229880

ABSTRACT

In 2022, a new outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic created considerable challenges for the Shanghai public health system. However, conventional prevention and control strategies, which only rely on formal organizations, inefficiently decrease the number of infections. Thus, a multi-organization management mode is needed for pandemic prevention. In this paper, we applied a stochastic actor-oriented model (SAOM) to analyze how these social organizations cooperate with others and further identify the mechanism that drives them to create a reliable and sustainable cooperative relationship network from the perspective of social network analysis. The model allowed us to assess the effects of the actor's attributes, the network structure, and dynamic cooperative behavior in RSiena with longitudinal data collected from 220 participants in 19 social organizations. The results indicated that the number of cooperative relationships increased during the pandemic, from 44 to 162, which means the network between social organizations became more reliable. Furthermore, all the hypotheses set in four sub-models were significant (t-ratio < 0.1, overall max t-ratio < 0.25, and e/s > 2). Additionally, the estimated values showed that four factors played a positive role in forming the cooperative relationship network, i.e., all except the "same age group effect (−1.02)". The results also indicated that the social organizations tend to build relationships with more active actors in the community in every time period. This paper is of great significance regarding the innovation of public health system management and the improvement of Chinese grassroots governance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cooperative Behavior , China/epidemiology , Organizations
2.
Am J Public Health ; 113(2): 166-169, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197631

ABSTRACT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has partnered with the National Center for Farmworker Health to respond to the impact of COVID-19 on US farmworker communities. Immigrant farmworkers are often isolated from public health infrastructure. This partnership built the capacity of a national network of organizations to connect farmworkers to COVID-19 education and vaccinations in 20 states through training and resource sharing. The partnership funded 194 network member staff, trained 1130 individuals, and supported COVID-19 outreach to more than 600 000 farmworkers. (Am J Public Health. 2023;113(2):166-169. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307159).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Farmers , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Organizations , Public Health , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S.
3.
Acad Med ; 98(1): 123-135, 2023 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190817

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic presented new barriers and exacerbated existing inequities for physician scholars. While COVID-19's impact on academic productivity among women has received attention, the pandemic may have posed additional challenges for scholars from a wider range of equity-deserving groups, including those who hold multiple equity-deserving identities. To examine this concern, the authors conducted a scoping review of the literature through an intersectionality lens. METHOD: The authors searched peer-reviewed literature published March 1, 2020, to December 16, 2021, in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, and PubMed. The authors excluded studies not written in English and/or outside of academic medicine. From included studies, they extracted data regarding descriptions of how COVID-19 impacted academic productivity of equity-deserving physician scholars, analyses on the pandemic's reported impact on productivity of physician scholars from equity-deserving groups, and strategies provided to reduce the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on academic productivity of physician scholars from equity-deserving groups. RESULTS: Of 11,587 unique articles, 44 met inclusion criteria, including 15 nonempirical studies and 29 empirical studies (22 bibliometrics studies, 6 surveys, and 1 qualitative study). All included articles focused on the gendered impact of the pandemic on academic productivity. The majority of their recommendations focused on how to alleviate the burden of the pandemic on women, particularly those in the early stages of their career and/or with children, without consideration of scholars who hold multiple and intersecting identities from a wider range of equity-deserving groups. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate a lack of published literature on the pandemic's impact on physician scholars from equity-deserving groups, including a lack of consideration of physician scholars who experience multiple forms of discrimination. Well-intentioned measures by academic institutions to reduce the impact on scholars may inadvertently risk reproducing and sustaining inequities that equity-deserving scholars faced during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Child , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Organizations , Schools
4.
Nature ; 611(7935): 332-345, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106424

ABSTRACT

Despite notable scientific and medical advances, broader political, socioeconomic and behavioural factors continue to undercut the response to the COVID-19 pandemic1,2. Here we convened, as part of this Delphi study, a diverse, multidisciplinary panel of 386 academic, health, non-governmental organization, government and other experts in COVID-19 response from 112 countries and territories to recommend specific actions to end this persistent global threat to public health. The panel developed a set of 41 consensus statements and 57 recommendations to governments, health systems, industry and other key stakeholders across six domains: communication; health systems; vaccination; prevention; treatment and care; and inequities. In the wake of nearly three years of fragmented global and national responses, it is instructive to note that three of the highest-ranked recommendations call for the adoption of whole-of-society and whole-of-government approaches1, while maintaining proven prevention measures using a vaccines-plus approach2 that employs a range of public health and financial support measures to complement vaccination. Other recommendations with at least 99% combined agreement advise governments and other stakeholders to improve communication, rebuild public trust and engage communities3 in the management of pandemic responses. The findings of the study, which have been further endorsed by 184 organizations globally, include points of unanimous agreement, as well as six recommendations with >5% disagreement, that provide health and social policy actions to address inadequacies in the pandemic response and help to bring this public health threat to an end.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delphi Technique , International Cooperation , Public Health , Humans , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Government , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health/economics , Public Health/methods , Organizations , COVID-19 Vaccines , Communication , Health Education , Health Policy , Public Opinion
5.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 300: 190-202, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089735

ABSTRACT

Cyber security attacks evidence has shown that many sectors and industries are still at an insufficient level of readiness to counter these threats, including healthcare organizations and the entire healthcare industry. The COVID-19 pandemic has additionally launched the issue of cyber protection of healthcare systems and connected medical and other devices as well as modern IT components, which are often the entry point for attackers against healthcare organizations. With the aim of a systematic approach to cyber security in healthcare organizations, this article comprehensively presents cyber risks and possible consequences of attacks in the context of healthcare organization services, as well as identifies the five most important cyber security challenges and provides recommendations for establishing protection mechanisms in line with best practices.


Subject(s)
Computer Security , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , COVID-19 , Organizations , Pandemics
6.
Am J Public Health ; 112(S9): S887-S891, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079889

ABSTRACT

Increasing access to COVID-19 testing in influential, accessible community settings is needed to address COVID-19 disparities among African Americans. We describe COVID-19 testing intervention approaches conducted in Kansas City, Missouri, African American churches via a faith-health-academic partnership. Trained faith leaders promoted COVID-19 testing with church and community members by implementing multilevel interventions using a tailored toolkit and standard education information. The local health department conducted more than 300 COVID-19 tests during or after Sunday church services and outreach ministry activities. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(S9):S887-S891. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306981).


Subject(s)
Black or African American , COVID-19 , Humans , Health Promotion , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Organizations
7.
Nat Hum Behav ; 6(11): 1503-1514, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2016716

ABSTRACT

Balancing social utility and equity in distributing limited vaccines is a critical policy concern for protecting against the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic and future health emergencies. What is the nature of the trade-off between maximizing collective welfare and minimizing disparities between more and less privileged communities? To evaluate vaccination strategies, we propose an epidemic model that explicitly accounts for both demographic and mobility differences among communities and their associations with heterogeneous COVID-19 risks, then calibrate it with large-scale data. Using this model, we find that social utility and equity can be simultaneously improved when vaccine access is prioritized for the most disadvantaged communities, which holds even when such communities manifest considerable vaccine reluctance. Nevertheless, equity among distinct demographic features may conflict; for example, low-income neighbourhoods might have fewer elder citizens. We design two behaviour-and-demography-aware indices, community risk and societal risk, which capture the risks communities face and those they impose on society from not being vaccinated, to inform the design of comprehensive vaccine distribution strategies. Our study provides a framework for uniting utility and equity-based considerations in vaccine distribution and sheds light on how to balance multiple ethical values in complex settings for epidemic control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Organizations , Vaccination
8.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 30(4): 639-647, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994933

ABSTRACT

The article discusses two main problems of organizing medical care in national health care of Russia: medical and social monitoring of morbidity and mortality; key performance indices of public health in the Russian Federation. Methodologically, the article is based on interdisciplinary scientific approach that allows to study medical, social and economic components of public health, considering observed trends: digitalization of health care and epidemic of new coronavirus infection. Based on statistical analysis of open data on morbidity and mortality of population in the Russian Federation over past few years, results were obtained indicating that collection of medical statistics is not built consistently that medical care in health care is not organized sequentially as cycle or process, but is presented in fragments. This leads to the fact that rural population has very limited access to multidisciplinary and high-tech medical services, and in structure of mortality there is high gender bias (males die more often than females in same classes of causes). Based on identified problems, two organizing solutions are proposed. The first solution is to create, on the basis of the Ministry of Health Care of Russia, special portal for complete, reliable and up-to-date medical statistics, which will be generated and processed using Big Data technologies. The second solution consists in transition from fragmentation to systematic organization of medical care in the "education and prevention-treatment-rehabilitation" continuum, while for each stage special set of key performance indices is established that allows to solve the tasks of improving public health, but also to develop harmonized social and economic public policy.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Sexism , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Morbidity , Organizations , Russia/epidemiology
9.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 30(4): 537-542, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994931

ABSTRACT

The article considers actual topic concerning acquisition by migrant associations of certain importance in the public sphere of different countries. The analysis demonstrated that these public structures begin to act as actors of intersectorial cooperation within the framework of state policy in the fields of migration and health care. It is substantiated that various institutions of civil society remained in shadow of state and commercial structures for a long time. Only recently, Russian socially oriented noncommercial organizations acquired status of suppliers of social services, including medical social care of population. At that, they became a subject of cooperation in order to provide medical social care to population, which is provided not only to Russian citizens within the framework of mandatory medical insurance, but also to migrants. It is proved that during the pandemic, many noncommercial organizations expanded scope of cooperation with government, business and public structures of medical and social profile. Some noncommercial organizations that were originally organized as associations of migrants and had character of diasporas are now legitimate NGOs. Such organizational and functional changes can be interpreted as a result of development in the field of care of migrants and their integration into the Russian noncommercial sector. As a consequence of transnational commitment of migrants themselves and their interest in development of their native countries. Also, as a result of institutional integration, and consequence of spreading of COVID-19 and intensification of need in medical and social care to countrymen and their families. It is concluded that institutional changes allow NGOs to establish more open relations with associations of migrants of various origins, as well as to attract additional resources for planning, financing and implementing projects that are strategically important both for survival of organizations themselves and for helping migrants in pandemic conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Organizations , Social Support
10.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0269089, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923705

ABSTRACT

As a result of business environment reforms in China's Hangzou, the cost of business has reduced, the confidence of Hangzhou enterprises has survived the COVID-19 outbreak, and foreign investment continues to increase. Nevertheless, Hangzhou's business environment has shortcomings, such as insufficient technology, talent, and intelligent infrastructure. Two unresolved questions persist: (i) Has the smart business environment stimulated corporate investment by reducing system costs and boosting corporate confidence? (ii) How do the commercial climate's shortcomings impact the relationship between the intelligent business environment and business costs/confidence? We examined the impact of a local smart business environment on the corporate investment scale in Hangzhou using factor analysis, cluster analysis, linear regression, and path analyses of data from 297 firm managers. Smart governance improved public administration, financing, and rule of law. The business environment promoted investment by increasing business confidence and decreasing institutional costs. Weak intelligent property protection and legal fairness hindered the positive influence of smart governance on business confidence and system costs. This is the first study combining business environment, smart city, and smart governance concepts to analyze the influence of local smart business environments on business confidence, institutional costs, and investment. Our conclusion on the limitation effect of intelligent business environment on enterprise investment attempts to inspire further research on the intersection of business environments and smart cities. The law of intelligent business environment attracting investment obtained in the context of China, the largest developing country with diversified economic development, is of great significance for other developing countries. Countries can attract investment and promote economic development through intelligent governance. Developing countries should construct smart service platforms, coordinate supervision of public credit, reduce financing constraint, construct a government under the rule of law, improve the quality of land management, and protect intellectual property rights.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Commerce , Economic Development , Humans , Investments , Organizations
11.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269582, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902636

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 has impacted the U.S. economy and business organizations in multiple ways, yet its influence on company fundamentals and risk structures have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we apply LDA, a mainstream topic model, to analyze the risk factor section from SEC filings (10-K and 10-Q), and describe risk structure change over the past two years. The results show that Covid-19 has transformed the risk structures U.S. companies face in the short run, exerting excessive stress on international interactions, operations, and supply chains. However, this shock has been waning since the second quarter of 2020. Our model shows that risk structure change (measured by topic distribution) from Covid-19 is a significant predictor of lower performance, but smaller companies tend to be stricken harder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Machine Learning , Organizations , Pandemics
12.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 15(4): 319-329, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1871918

ABSTRACT

Validation activities are essential for organisations to ensure the ongoing efficacy and hence value of their business continuity arrangements. While COVID-19 has impacted the ability to perform normal validation activities in the business continuity life cycle, it has provided the opportunity for a significant live test of recovery strategies, business continuity plans, and response and recovery teams. This paper draws from practical experience with and reviews of approximately 30 Australian companies, and discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on maintenance, exercising and review. It provides suggestions for harnessing and articulating the lessons learned from an unprecedented, global disruptive event, and the adaptation of validation techniques in the new normal to increase both organisational resilience and enhance customer value propositions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , Humans , Organizations
13.
J Allied Health ; 51(2): e59-e63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1870702

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, academic leaders were pressed to respond to the growing health crisis. The rapid response and decision-making necessitated heightened vigilance, emotional intelligence, and attention to institutional turbulence. To understand the pattern of planning and action from academic leaders in response to the global health crisis, we conducted a study to explore the framing of decisions among academic deans during COVID-19. In this qualitative study, 10 participants were interviewed via Zoom using 10 questions designed to gather data related to both a leadership framing theory and management styles in the time of crisis. Qualitative data analysis identified common themes which aligned with Bolman and Deal's leadership frames of structural, human relations, symbolic, and political domains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leadership , Organizations , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 640, 2022 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2021, during the COVID-19 pandemic, England's Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) released a White Paper outlining proposed legislative reform of the National Health Service (NHS). Key to the proposals is the shift from relationships between providers based on competition, to cooperation, as the central driver of improved performance and quality. Against this background we explore potential regulatory barriers and enablers to collaboration identified by key NHS stakeholders and assess whether the proposed policy changes are likely to deliver the desired improvement in collaborative relationships, in the context of challenges experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted 32 semi-structured interviews with 30 key stakeholders, taking place during the COVID-19 pandemic from Jan 2020 to May 2021. Participants were selected for their expertise regarding collaboration and were recruited purposively. Interviews were conducted online with the use of video conferencing software. The interviews were thematically analysed to identify themes. Proposals contained in the DHSC White Paper helped to structure the thematic analysis, interpretation, and reporting of the results. RESULTS: Requirements to compete to provide services, regulatory ability to block collaborative arrangements, lack of collaboration between providers and Clinical Commissioning Groups, and current lack of data sharing were found to hamper collaborative efforts. These issues often negatively affected collaborative relations by increasing bureaucracy and prompted leaders to attempt to avoid future collaborations. Other barriers included opaque accountability arrangements, and erosion of trust in regulators. The COVID-19 pandemic was found to foster collaboration between organisations, but some changes mandated by the new legislation may stifle further collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the proposed legislative changes in the White Paper would help to remove existing barriers to service integration and collaboration identified by stakeholders. However, the proposed shift in the concentration of power from NHS England to the DHSC may exacerbate historically low levels of trust between providers and regulators. Many of the proposed changes fail to address endemic NHS policy issues such as chronic understaffing. Further dialogue is needed at all levels of the health and social care system to ensure future legislative changes meet the needs of all stakeholders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , State Medicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organizations , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
16.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 33(1): 517-527, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686068

ABSTRACT

In 2018, The University of Texas Health Science Center-Tyler and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley were invited to develop clinical research units for an existing Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium with the objective to equip medically underserved, economically disadvantaged communities and subsequently to deploy COVID-19 clinical trials in response to a public health emergency.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Organizations , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas
17.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 37(3): 1229-1237, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680341

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unfolding crisis which is continually testing the resilience of healthcare organisations. In this context, a key requirement for executives, managers and frontline staff is continually adapting, learning and coping with complexity under pressure to deliver high quality and safe care. Sydney Local Health District has responded to the COVID-19 crisis, in part, through the pivoting of rpavirtual, a newly established virtual health service, to deliver an innovative model of care in a clinically rigorous and safe manner. Through reviewing the rapid evolution of rpavirtual's purpose, implementation challenges and impact, we investigate how it has displayed resilience and derive key lessons for health organisations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Organizations , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e039246, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare is increasingly challenged to meet the demands of user involvement and knowledge mobilisation required by the 21st-century patient-centred and knowledge-based economies. Innovations are needed to reduce problematic barriers to knowledge exchange and improve collaborative problem solving. Living labs, as open knowledge systems, have the potential to address these gaps but are underexplored in healthcare. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct the first systematic review of living labs across healthcare contexts. We will comprehensively search the following online databases from inception to 31 December 2020: Scopus, the Cochrane Library (Wiley), Medline (OVID), Embase (OVID), Web of Science, PsycINFO (OVID) and EBSCOhost databases including Academic Search Complete, Business Source Premier, Canadian Reference Centre, CINAHL, MasterFILE Premier, SPORTDiscus, Library & Information Science Source, Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, AgeLine, EconLit, Art Full Text, Women's Studies International and Social Work Abstracts. We will search for grey literature using Google advanced techniques and books/book chapters through scholarly and bibliographical databases. We will use a dual-reviewer, two-step selection process with pre-established inclusion criteria and limit to English language publications. Empirical studies of any design examining living lab development, implementation or evaluation in health or healthcare will be included. We will use the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) for methodological quality appraisal and Covidence software for review management, and we will extract data on pre-established variables such as lab context and technological platforms. We will create evidence tables and analyse across variables such as focal aim and achievement of living lab principles, such as the use of cocreation and multimethod approaches. We will tabulate data for descriptive reporting and narrative synthesis to identify current applications, approaches and promising areas for living lab development across health contexts. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was not required for this review. This review will inform research into living labs in health environments, including guidance for a living lab in paediatric rehabilitation. Academic publications shared through collaborative networks and social media channels will provide substantive knowledge to the growing tech-health development sector and to researchers, practitioners and organisations seeking enhanced patient/stakeholder engagement and innovations in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020175275.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Canada , Child , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Organizations , Review Literature as Topic
19.
Global Health ; 16(1): 79, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750233

ABSTRACT

The Second International Symposium on One Health Research (ISOHR) was held in Guangzhou city, China on 23-24 November 2019. A transdisciplinary collaborative approach, One Health (OH), was the central theme of the symposium which brought together more than 260 experts, scholars and emerging researchers from human health, veterinary health, food safety, environmental health and related disciplines and sectors. More than 50 organizations including World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control (USA), and Queensland Government (Australia) participated in the symposium. Scholars, experts and emerging researchers, policy-makers and practitioners in their respective fields delivered over 50 presentations at the symposium, highlighting the collective vulnerability to some of the emerging health challenges the region was combating. These included emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, food safety and the growing burden of non-communicable diseases. The Pearl River Declaration, emanated from the symposium, called for establishing a One Health Cooperation Network in the Southeast Asia-Pacific region with a vision to strengthen regional health security through sharing each other's knowledge and experience, and making investments in workforce development, scientific innovations such as vaccine research and development, sharing epidemic intelligence, risk identification, risk communication and appropriate response measures against emerging health threats.


Subject(s)
Global Health , One Health , World Health Organization , China , Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Epidemics , Government , Humans , International Cooperation , Organizations
20.
Harm Reduct J ; 18(1): 17, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A range of civil society organisations (CSOs) such as drug user groups, non-governmental/third sector organisations and networks of existing organisations, seek to shape the development of drugs policy at national and international levels. However, their capacity to do so is shaped by the contexts in which they operate nationally and internationally. The aim of this paper is to explore the lived experience of civil society participation in these contexts, both from the perspective of CSOs engaged in harm reduction advocacy, and the institutions they engage with, in order to inform future policy development. METHODS: This paper is based on the presentations and discussions from a workshop on 'Civil Society Involvement in Drug Policy hosted by the Correlation - European Harm Reduction Network at the International Society for the Study of Drugs Policy (ISSDP) annual conference in Paris, 2019. In the aftermath of the workshop, the authors analysed the papers and discussions and identified the key themes arising to inform CSI in developing future harm reduction policy and practice. RESULTS: Civil society involvement (CSI) in policy decision-making and implementation is acknowledged as an important benefit to representative democracy. Yet, the accounts of CSOs demonstrate the challenges they experience in seeking to shape the contested field of drug policy. Negotiating the complex workings of political institutions, often in adversarial and heavily bureaucratic environments, proved difficult. Nonetheless, an increase in structures which formalised and resourced CSI enabled more meaningful participation at different levels and at different stages of policy making. CONCLUSIONS: Civil society spaces are colonised by a broad range of civil society actors lobbying from different ideological standpoints including those advocating for a 'drug free world' and those advocating for harm reduction. In these competitive arena, it may be difficult for harm reduction orientated CSOs to influence the policy process. However, the current COVID-19 public health crisis clearly demonstrates the benefits of partnership between CSOs and political institutions to address the harm reduction needs of people who use drugs. The lessons drawn from our workshop serve to inform all partners on this pathway.


Subject(s)
Drug and Narcotic Control/methods , Harm Reduction , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Organizations/legislation & jurisprudence , Policy Making , Humans
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