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1.
J Emerg Manag ; 20(7): 57-69, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786201

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, some nonprofit organizations (NPOs) have been struggling to maintain their operations, while others are able to coordinate with partners to provide programs and services locally and globally. This study explores how NPOs are able to survive and actively engage in local and global COVID-19 responses by investigating the organizational capacities of the Tzu Chi Foundation, a Taiwan-based international NPO. This study employs interview data and secondary data from a variety of sources to answer the research questions. Through this case study, we find that Tzu Chi Foundation's capacity to coordinate local and global COVID-19 issues quickly, broadly, and effectively can be attributed to three main factors: (1) clear mission and charismatic leadership, (2) rich experience of disaster relief and recovery strategies, and (3) committed and active volunteers. Moreover, we find that financial management capacity and adaptive capacity are two crucial kinds of capacity for enabling the Tzu Chi Foundation to survive and continuously engage in emergency responses during the pandemic. We conclude with implications for future nonprofit capacity and emergency management research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics , Taiwan
2.
Am J Public Health ; 112(3): 417-425, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701797

ABSTRACT

Community-based organizations (CBOs) are integral to achieving the goal of Ending the HIV epidemic (EHE). Their familiarity with and proximity to communities position them to effectively implement strategies necessary to address determinants of health through their formal and informal medical and social services. However, structural inequities have contributed to the demise of many organizations that were instrumental in early responses to the HIV epidemic. We define structural inequities for HIV CBOs as systems in which policies, institutional practices, organizational (mis)representations, and other norms work to produce and maintain inequities that affect CBOs' ability to survive and thrive. In this discussion, we describe the organizational threats to grassroots HIV CBOs and the risks to livelihood and longevity, including examples. The invaluable role of HIV CBOs in EHE and their role in responding to existing and novel infectious diseases like COVID-19 should not be overlooked. Recommendations to promote structural equity are offered. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(3):417-425. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306688).


Subject(s)
Community Networks/organization & administration , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Organizations, Nonprofit/organization & administration , Epidemics , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit/economics
4.
Harm Reduct J ; 18(1): 127, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566525

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had especially devastating effects on people who use drugs. Due to pandemic protocols in the USA, medication-assisted treatment (MAT) regulations became more flexible, permitting our community-based nonprofit organization to transition its low-threshold MAT clinic to an audio-only telehealth model of care in 2020. Lessons learned have the potential to improve MAT delivery to people with OUD. CASE PRESENTATION: This case study describes our transition from a low-threshold community-based in-person MAT clinic to an audio-only telehealth model. We extracted data from electronic health records to describe patient characteristics and to calculate treatment retention rates. Patients were predominantly male (74.4%) and black (90.6%). The mean age was 53 years old with more than half of the clients aged 55 or older. Less than half (42.3%) of the patients lived in stable housing. Patients commonly had self-reported comorbid conditions such as hypertension (35.4%), hepatitis C (23.5%), diabetes (11.9%), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (7.2%). A majority of patients (68.6%) reported engagement with behavioral health care. We measure the success of our intervention relative to published retention rates, both overall as well as for in-person and telehealth care. In-person retention rates at 90- and 180-days were substantially higher than telehealth retention rates (93.9% vs 68.4% and 91.5% vs 51.9%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Low-threshold medication-assisted treatment in the care of people with opioid use disorder is essential to increasing treatment access and continuity. We found that an audio-only telehealth model was viable. Although we had decreased retention rates following the transition to an audio-only telehealth model, our rates remained excellent compared to published values for in-person MAT care. We call for advocacy and regulations to support continued use of telehealth services throughout and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , District of Columbia , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Opiate Substitution Treatment , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2119621, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359743

ABSTRACT

Importance: In 2020 and early 2021, the National Football League (NFL) and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) opted to host football games in stadiums across the country. The in-person attendance of games varied with time and from county to county. There is currently no evidence on whether limited in-person attendance of games is associated with COVID-19 case numbers on a county-level. Objective: To assess whether NFL and NCAA football games with limited in-person attendance were associated with increased COVID-19 cases in the counties they were held compared with a matched set of counties. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this time-series cross-sectional study, every county hosting NFL or NCAA games with in-person attendance (treated group) in 2020 and 2021 was matched with a county that that did not host a game on the corresponding day but had an identical game history for up to 14 days prior (control group). A standard matching method was used to further refine this matched set so that the treated and matched control counties had similar population size, nonpharmaceutical interventions in place, and COVID-19 trends. The association of hosting games with in-person attendance with COVID-19 cases was assessed using a difference-in-difference estimator. Data were analyzed from August 29 to December 28, 2020. Exposures: Hosting NFL or NCAA games. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was estimation of new COVID-19 cases per 100 000 residents at the county level reported up to 14 days after a game among counties with NFL and NCAA games with in-person attendance. Results: A total of 528 games with in-person attendance (101 NFL games [19.1%]; 427 NCAA games [80.9%]) were included. The matching algorithm returned 361 matching sets of counties. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of attendance for NFL games was 9949 (6000 to 13 797) people. The median number of attendance for NCAA games was not available, and attendance was recorded as a binary variable. The median (IQR) daily new COVID-19 cases in treatment group counties hosting games was 26.14 (10.77-50.25) cases per 100 000 residents on game day. The median (IQR) daily new COVID-19 cases in control group counties where no games were played was 24.11 (9.64-48.55) cases per 100 000 residents on game day. The treatment effect size ranged from -5.17 to 4.72, with a mean (SD) of 1.21 (2.67) cases per 100 000 residents, within the 14-day period in all counties hosting the games, and the daily treatment effect trend remained relatively steady during this period. Conclusions and Relevance: This cross-sectional study did not find a consistent increase in the daily COVID-19 cases per 100 000 residents in counties where NFL and NCAA games were held with limited in-person attendance. These findings suggest that NFL and NCAA football games hosted with limited in-person attendance were not associated with substantial risk for increased local COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Population Health/statistics & numerical data , Sentinel Surveillance , Sports and Recreational Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Football , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies , United States/epidemiology , Universities
6.
Eval Program Plann ; 89: 101985, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347602

ABSTRACT

Data are the lifeblood of decision-making and provide a critical component into the complex mosaic from which decisions emerge. Evaluators and decision-makers should, therefore, continuously seek to explore the use of tools that can produce more meaningful, insightful, and useful data so that decision-making can be enhanced and improved. Traditional economic appraisal methods offer much and are very useful and relevant. Standard financial accounting reporting for tax purposes also provide insightful information on the organization's financial health and that of its individual programs. However, neither offer insight into cost behavior-an important consideration for making program operations more efficient and for long-term strategic planning, forecasting, and design of program operations. Before COVID-19, programs were already challenged with competition for donor dollars and the pursuit for financial sustainability. The COVID-19 environment has considerably exacerbated these challenges. In this current environment, it is more important than ever for nonprofits to optimize limited financial resources to do more societal good. This paper will illustrate how selected concepts from cost and management accounting can be used by both independent program evaluators to improve their recommendations, as well as program administrators in-charge of nonprofits to enhance decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Strategic Planning , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 763-767, 2021 Jun.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335586

ABSTRACT

The article presents the results of a study aimed at identifying the problems of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the study showed that not only people of older age groups are infected, but also young people with chronic diseases. Forced isolation, uncertainty of the future and stress have significantly worsened the physical, social and mental health of the population of all age groups. Therefore, people began to strengthen their own physical, social and psychological health, to carry out preventive health measures. The problems of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic can be effectively solved by using an integrated approach to public health, jointly provided by state and public organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Lifestyle , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
8.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 748-751, 2021 Jun.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335585

ABSTRACT

The article is devoted to the study of the process of transformation of the activities of Russian children's public organizations in the face of the threat of the spread of coronavirus infection COVID-19 and the opening of new opportunities for non-profit organizations to work in this situation. The paper uses the results of a survey conducted from March 18 to 23, 2020 by experts of the Charitable Foundation for the Development of Philanthropy, which covered 232 organizations operating in the non-profit sector. The results of the study allowed us to conclude that the period of self-isolation contributed to the stimulation of children's public organizations to actively implement information technologies in their activities, find new opportunities for remote interaction in their work, and develop online projects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organizations, Nonprofit/organization & administration , Child , Humans , Russia , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0251991, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262544

ABSTRACT

Based on the investigation of financial fairness perception and donation intention of individual donors in non-profit organizations (NPOs), this paper uses structural equation model to analyze the impact of individual donors' financial fairness perception on donation intention. The results show that individual donors' perceptions on financial result fairness, financial procedure fairness and financial information fairness all have positive impact on donation intention; among which the perception on financial result fairness only has direct impact on individual donation intention, while the perceptions on financial procedure fairness and financial information fairness have direct and indirect impact on individual donation intention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Gift Giving/ethics , Motivation/ethics , Organizations, Nonprofit/economics , Pandemics/economics , Perception/ethics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , Organizations, Nonprofit/ethics , Organizations, Nonprofit/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/ethics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
J Law Med Ethics ; 49(1): 30-33, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221085

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the vulnerability of the US generic drug supply chain to foreign production. Many policies have been proposed to mitigate this vulnerability. In this article, we argue that nonprofit drug manufacturers have the potential to make important contributions.


Subject(s)
Drug Industry/economics , Drugs, Generic/supply & distribution , Organizations, Nonprofit/economics , Prescription Drugs/supply & distribution , Legislation as Topic , United States
11.
Hum Genomics ; 15(1): 12, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079267

ABSTRACT

This letter is the Human Genome Organisation's summary reaction to the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. It identifies key areas for genomics research, and areas in which genomic scientists can contribute to a global response to the pandemic. The letter has been reviewed and endorsed by the HUGO Committee on Ethics, Law and Society (CELS) and the HUGO Council.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Societies, Scientific , COVID-19/epidemiology , Genomics/organization & administration , Human Genome Project , Humans , Information Dissemination , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics
12.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(6): 1704-1716, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744059

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance about management of psoriatic disease during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A task force (TF) of 18 physician voting members with expertise in dermatology, rheumatology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, and critical care was convened. The TF was supplemented by nonvoting members, which included fellows and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) staff. Clinical questions relevant to the psoriatic disease community were informed by questions received by the NPF. A Delphi process was conducted. RESULTS: The TF approved 22 guidance statements. The average of the votes was within the category of agreement for all statements. All guidance statements proposed were recommended, 9 with high consensus and 13 with moderate consensus. LIMITATIONS: The evidence behind many guidance statements is limited in quality. CONCLUSION: These statements provide guidance for the management of patients with psoriatic disease on topics ranging from how the disease and its treatments impact COVID-19 risk and outcome, how medical care can be optimized during the pandemic, what patients should do to lower their risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and what they should do if they develop COVID-19. The guidance is intended to be a living document that will be updated by the TF as data emerge.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Organizations, Nonprofit/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Advisory Committees/standards , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Care/standards , Delphi Technique , Dermatology/standards , Epidemiology/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine/standards , Organizations, Nonprofit/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/immunology , Rheumatology/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
13.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(10): 2482-2484, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634429

ABSTRACT

Public mental health response to coronavirus disease is essential. After reviewing systemic and local efforts in China, we found efficient coordination and human resources. We recommend better symptom assessment, monitoring of organizations, and basic needs protection. This recommendation can inform how other countries can overcome mental health challenges during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Universities , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Government Agencies , Hospitals , Hotlines , Humans , Mental Disorders/virology , Organizations, Nonprofit , Public Health , Resource Allocation , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Symptom Assessment
14.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1526-1532, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-434497

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on many aspects of head and neck cancer (HNC) care. The uncertainty and stress resulting from these changes has led many patients and caregivers to turn to HNC advocacy groups for guidance and support. Here we outline some of the issues being faced by patients with HNC during the current crisis and provide examples of programs being developed by advocacy groups to address them. We also highlight the increased utilization of these organizations that has been observed as well as some of the challenges being faced by these not-for-profit groups as they work to serve the head and neck community.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Foundations , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Advocacy , Patient Education as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Telemedicine
15.
Diabetes Technol Ther ; 22(6): 440-443, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291219

ABSTRACT

Today, in the United States, we have a health care system that is designed to treat symptoms, not people-and to do so as cheaply as possible with the dual goals of minimizing costs and preventing hospital visits. We are failing on all fronts. We spend more money on health care per capita than our Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) peers, and our outcomes are mediocre at best. Medicine is not personal, health care professionals often have their hands tied by payers, and geography has too much influence on the quality of care available. This has to end, especially since we have the technology to create a truly patient-focused, whole-person approach-one that treats physical and mental health equally and meets people where they are in every sense. Telemedicine can level the playing field and enable higher quality, decentralized care that-when needed-brings specialty care to the masses. Other technologies have an important role, too. For patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1 diabetes), widespread uptake of continuous glucose monitors may be the game-changer we need right now that can facilitate telemedicine to remote places and remove health care disparities. Both health professionals and patients will win-and ultimately payers will, too.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Healthcare Disparities , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/virology , Humans , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , United States
16.
J Am Coll Surg ; 230(6): 1080-1091.e3, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-19467

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was first diagnosed in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and has now spread throughout the world, being verified by the World Health Organization as a pandemic on March 11. This had led to the calling of a national emergency on March 13 in the US. Many hospitals, healthcare networks, and specifically, departments of surgery, are asking the same questions about how to cope and plan for surge capacity, personnel attrition, novel infrastructure utilization, and resource exhaustion. Herein, we present a tiered plan for surgical department planning based on incident command levels. This includes acute care surgeon deployment (given their critical care training and vertically integrated position in the hospital), recommended infrastructure and transfer utilization, triage principles, and faculty, resident, and advanced care practitioner deployment.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Southeastern United States , Surge Capacity , Telemedicine , Triage
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