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1.
Cell Rep ; 37(6): 109920, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530684

ABSTRACT

It is urgent to develop disease models to dissect mechanisms regulating severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we derive airway organoids from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-AOs). The hPSC-AOs, particularly ciliated-like cells, are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Using this platform, we perform a high content screen and identify GW6471, which blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection. GW6471 can also block infection of the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 variant. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis suggests that GW6471 blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection at least in part by inhibiting hypoxia inducible factor 1 subunit alpha (HIF1α), which is further validated by chemical inhibitor and genetic perturbation targeting HIF1α. Metabolic profiling identifies decreased rates of glycolysis upon GW6471 treatment, consistent with transcriptome profiling. Finally, xanthohumol, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid, and ND-646, three compounds that suppress fatty acid biosynthesis, also block SARS-CoV-2 infection. Together, a high content screen coupled with transcriptome and metabolic profiling reveals a key role of the HIF1α-glycolysis axis in mediating SARS-CoV-2 infection of human airway epithelium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Glycolysis/physiology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Organoids/metabolism , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome/physiology , Vero Cells
2.
Mech Ageing Dev ; 199: 111551, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492370

ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are chemopreventive through the induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated proteins and anti-inflammatory pathways. These pathways, encoding cytoprotective vitagenes, include heat shock proteins, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as well as glutathione redox system to protect against cancer initiation and progression. Phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cancer cells, activating at low dose, signaling pathways resulting in upregulation of vitagenes, as in the case of the Nrf2 pathway upregulated by hydroxytyrosol (HT) or curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Here, the importance of vitagenes in redox stress response and autophagy mechanisms, as well as the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of multiple types of cancer are discussed. We also discuss the possible relationship between SARS-CoV-2, inflammation and cancer, exploiting innovative therapeutic approaches with HT-rich aqueous olive pulp extract (Hidrox®), a natural polyphenolic formulation, as well as the rationale of Vitamin D supplementation. Finally, we describe innovative approaches with organoids technology to study human carcinogenesis in preclinical models from basic cancer research to clinical practice, suggesting patient-derived organoids as an innovative tool to test drug toxicity and drive personalized therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Drug Development , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Organoids/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress/genetics
3.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5498, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428814

ABSTRACT

Rapid identification of host genes essential for virus replication may expedite the generation of therapeutic interventions. Genetic screens are often performed in transformed cell lines that poorly represent viral target cells in vivo, leading to discoveries that may not be translated to the clinic. Intestinal organoids are increasingly used to model human disease and are amenable to genetic engineering. To discern which host factors are reliable anti-coronavirus therapeutic targets, we generate mutant clonal IOs for 19 host genes previously implicated in coronavirus biology. We verify ACE2 and DPP4 as entry receptors for SARS-CoV/SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV respectively. SARS-CoV-2 replication in IOs does not require the endosomal Cathepsin B/L proteases, but specifically depends on the cell surface protease TMPRSS2. Other TMPRSS family members were not essential. The newly emerging coronavirus variant B.1.1.7, as well as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV similarly depended on TMPRSS2. These findings underscore the relevance of non-transformed human models for coronavirus research, identify TMPRSS2 as an attractive pan-coronavirus therapeutic target, and demonstrate that an organoid knockout biobank is a valuable tool to investigate the biology of current and future emerging coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Biological Specimen Banks , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Coronavirus , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Organoids/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome , Virus Replication
4.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390542

ABSTRACT

The rising prevalence of diabetes is threatening global health. It is known not only for the occurrence of severe complications but also for the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic, which shows that it exacerbates susceptibility to infections. Current therapies focus on artificially maintaining insulin homeostasis, and a durable cure has not yet been achieved. We demonstrate that our set of small molecule inhibitors of DYRK1A kinase potently promotes ß-cell proliferation, enhances long-term insulin secretion, and balances glucagon level in the organoid model of the human islets. Comparable activity is seen in INS-1E and MIN6 cells, in isolated mice islets, and human iPSC-derived ß-cells. Our compounds exert a significantly more pronounced effect compared to harmine, the best-documented molecule enhancing ß-cell proliferation. Using a body-like environment of the organoid, we provide a proof-of-concept that small-molecule-induced human ß-cell proliferation via DYRK1A inhibition is achievable, which lends a considerable promise for regenerative medicine in T1DM and T2DM treatment.


Subject(s)
Homeostasis , Insulin-Secreting Cells/cytology , Insulin-Secreting Cells/enzymology , Insulin/metabolism , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Genes, Reporter , Harmine/pharmacology , Homeostasis/drug effects , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/drug effects , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/drug effects , Kinetics , Male , Mice , Models, Biological , NFATC Transcription Factors/metabolism , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/metabolism , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , Rats , Transforming Growth Factor beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism
5.
Hepatology ; 74(4): 1825-1844, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: NASH will soon become the leading cause of liver transplantation in the United States and is also associated with increased COVID-19 mortality. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs available that slow NASH progression or address NASH liver involvement in COVID-19. Because animal models cannot fully recapitulate human NASH, we hypothesized that stem cells isolated directly from end-stage liver from patients with NASH may address current knowledge gaps in human NASH pathology. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We devised methods that allow the derivation, proliferation, hepatic differentiation, and extensive characterization of bipotent ductal organoids from irreversibly damaged liver from patients with NASH. The transcriptomes of organoids derived from NASH liver, but not healthy liver, show significant up-regulation of proinflammatory and cytochrome p450-related pathways, as well as of known liver fibrosis and tumor markers, with the degree of up-regulation being patient-specific. Functionally, NASH liver organoids exhibit reduced passaging/growth capacity and hallmarks of NASH liver, including decreased albumin production, increased free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation, increased sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli, and increased cytochrome P450 metabolism. After hepatic differentiation, NASH liver organoids exhibit reduced ability to dedifferentiate back to the biliary state, consistent with the known reduced regenerative ability of NASH livers. Intriguingly, NASH liver organoids also show strongly increased permissiveness to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vesicular stomatitis pseudovirus as well as up-regulation of ubiquitin D, a known inhibitor of the antiviral interferon host response. CONCLUSION: Expansion of primary liver stem cells/organoids derived directly from irreversibly damaged liver from patients with NASH opens up experimental avenues for personalized disease modeling and drug development that has the potential to slow human NASH progression and to counteract NASH-related SARS-CoV-2 effects.


Subject(s)
End Stage Liver Disease/pathology , Liver/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , End Stage Liver Disease/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Healthy Volunteers , Hepatocytes/immunology , Hepatocytes/metabolism , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/immunology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Liver/cytology , Liver/immunology , Liver Regeneration , Male , Middle Aged , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/immunology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Organoids/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Up-Regulation/immunology
6.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(8): 822-833, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338539

ABSTRACT

Clinical management of patients with severe complications of COVID-19 has been hindered by a lack of effective drugs and a failure to capture the extensive heterogeneity of the disease with conventional methods. Here we review the emerging roles of complex organoids in the study of SARS-CoV-2 infection, modelling of COVID-19 disease pathology and in drug, antibody and vaccine development. We discuss opportunities for COVID-19 research and remaining challenges in the application of organoids.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Organoids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323268

ABSTRACT

Organoids represent one of the most important advancements in the field of stem cells during the past decade. They are three-dimensional in vitro culturing models that originate from self-organizing stem cells and can mimic the in vivo structural and functional specificities of body organs. Organoids have been established from multiple adult tissues as well as pluripotent stem cells and have recently become a powerful tool for studying development and diseases in vitro, drug screening, and host-microbe interaction. The use of stem cells-that have self-renewal capacity to proliferate and differentiate into specialized cell types-for organoids culturing represents a major advancement in biomedical research. Indeed, this new technology has a great potential to be used in a multitude of fields, including cancer research, hereditary and infectious diseases. Nevertheless, organoid culturing is still rife with many challenges, not limited to being costly and time consuming, having variable rates of efficiency in generation and maintenance, genetic stability, and clinical applications. In this review, we aim to provide a synopsis of pluripotent stem cell-derived organoids and their use for disease modeling and other clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Organ Culture Techniques/methods , Organoids/cytology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Animals , Humans , Models, Biological , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/metabolism , Pluripotent Stem Cells/drug effects , Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism
8.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 631, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283664

ABSTRACT

IL22 is an important cytokine involved in the intestinal defense mechanisms against microbiome. By using ileum-derived organoids, we show that the expression of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) and anti-viral peptides (AVPs) can be induced by IL22. In addition, we identified a bacterial and a viral route, both leading to IL22 production by T cells, but via different pathways. Bacterial products, such as LPS, induce enterocyte-secreted SAA1, which triggers the secretion of IL6 in fibroblasts, and subsequently IL22 in T cells. This IL22 induction can then be enhanced by macrophage-derived TNFα in two ways: by enhancing the responsiveness of T cells to IL6 and by increasing the expression of IL6 by fibroblasts. Viral infections of intestinal cells induce IFNß1 and subsequently IL7. IFNß1 can induce the expression of IL6 in fibroblasts and the combined activity of IL6 and IL7 can then induce IL22 expression in T cells. We also show that IL22 reduces the expression of viral entry receptors (e.g. ACE2, TMPRSS2, DPP4, CD46 and TNFRSF14), increases the expression of anti-viral proteins (e.g. RSAD2, AOS, ISG20 and Mx1) and, consequently, reduces the viral infection of neighboring cells. Overall, our data indicates that IL22 contributes to the innate responses against both bacteria and viruses.


Subject(s)
Interleukins/biosynthesis , Interleukins/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Cell Culture Techniques , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Enterocytes/immunology , Enterocytes/metabolism , Female , Fibroblasts/immunology , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Interleukins/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestines/physiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Organoids/metabolism , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins/genetics , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins/metabolism
9.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(4): e10232, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204403

ABSTRACT

Exacerbated pro-inflammatory immune response contributes to COVID-19 pathology. However, despite the mounting evidence about SARS-CoV-2 infecting the human gut, little is known about the antiviral programs triggered in this organ. To address this gap, we performed single-cell transcriptomics of SARS-CoV-2-infected intestinal organoids. We identified a subpopulation of enterocytes as the prime target of SARS-CoV-2 and, interestingly, found the lack of positive correlation between susceptibility to infection and the expression of ACE2. Infected cells activated strong pro-inflammatory programs and produced interferon, while expression of interferon-stimulated genes was limited to bystander cells due to SARS-CoV-2 suppressing the autocrine action of interferon. These findings reveal that SARS-CoV-2 curtails the immune response and highlights the gut as a pro-inflammatory reservoir that should be considered to fully understand SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Intestines/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis , COVID-19/virology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence , Organoids/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA
10.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 437-445, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084274

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a transmissible respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and has become a global health emergency. There is an urgent need for robust and practical in vitro model systems to investigate viral pathogenesis. Here, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived lung organoids (LORGs), cerebral organoids (CORGs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neurons, and astrocytes. LORGs containing epithelial cells, alveolar types 1 and 2, highly express ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 infection induces interferons, cytokines, and chemokines and activates critical inflammasome pathway genes. Spike protein inhibitor, EK1 peptide, and TMPRSS2 inhibitors (camostat/nafamostat) block viral entry in LORGs. Conversely, CORGs, NPCs, astrocytes, and neurons express low levels of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and correspondingly are not highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Infection in neuronal cells activates TLR3/7, OAS2, complement system, and apoptotic genes. These findings will aid in understanding COVID-19 pathogenesis and facilitate drug discovery.


Subject(s)
Brain/virology , COVID-19/virology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Lung/virology , Neural Stem Cells/virology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Apoptosis/physiology , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Lung/metabolism , Neural Stem Cells/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/virology , Organoids/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Stem Cells/metabolism , Stem Cells/virology
11.
EMBO J ; 40(5): e107651, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082516

ABSTRACT

Defining the pulmonary cell types infected by SARS-CoV-2 and finding ways to prevent subsequent tissue damage are key goals for controlling COVID-19. Recent work establishing a human lung organoid-derived air-liquid interface model permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection identifies alveolar type II cells as the primary cell type infected, reports an infection-induced interferon response and demonstrates the effectiveness of interferon lambda 1 treatment in dampening lung infection.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Models, Biological , Organoids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology
12.
Nature ; 589(7841): 270-275, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065893

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need to create novel models using human disease-relevant cells to study severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) biology and to facilitate drug screening. Here, as SARS-CoV-2 primarily infects the respiratory tract, we developed a lung organoid model using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-LOs). The hPSC-LOs (particularly alveolar type-II-like cells) are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and showed robust induction of chemokines following SARS-CoV-2 infection, similar to what is seen in patients with COVID-19. Nearly 25% of these patients also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which are associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes1. We therefore also generated complementary hPSC-derived colonic organoids (hPSC-COs) to explore the response of colonic cells to SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that multiple colonic cell types, especially enterocytes, express ACE2 and are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Using hPSC-LOs, we performed a high-throughput screen of drugs approved by the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) and identified entry inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2, including imatinib, mycophenolic acid and quinacrine dihydrochloride. Treatment at physiologically relevant levels of these drugs significantly inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection of both hPSC-LOs and hPSC-COs. Together, these data demonstrate that hPSC-LOs and hPSC-COs infected by SARS-CoV-2 can serve as disease models to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and provide a valuable resource for drug screening to identify candidate COVID-19 therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Colon/cytology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Lung/cytology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Colon/drug effects , Colon/virology , Drug Approval , Female , Heterografts/drug effects , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration , Viral Tropism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055070

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) was identified as the main host cell receptor for the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its subsequent infection. In some coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, it has been reported that the nervous tissues and the eyes were also affected. However, evidence supporting that the retina is a target tissue for SARS-CoV-2 infection is still lacking. This present study aimed to investigate whether ACE2 expression plays a role in human retinal neurons during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived retinal organoids and monolayer cultures derived from dissociated retinal organoids were generated. To validate the potential entry of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the retina, we showed that hiPSC-derived retinal organoids and monolayer cultures endogenously express ACE2 and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) on the mRNA level. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the protein expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in retinal organoids and monolayer cultures. Furthermore, using the SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus spike protein with GFP expression system, we found that retinal organoids and monolayer cultures can potentially be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus. Collectively, our findings highlighted the potential of iPSC-derived retinal organoids as the models for ACE2 receptor-based SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Retina/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Culture Techniques , Cell Line , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/metabolism , Retina/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization
14.
J Exp Med ; 218(3)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024074

ABSTRACT

Although COVID-19 is considered to be primarily a respiratory disease, SARS-CoV-2 affects multiple organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS). Yet, there is no consensus on the consequences of CNS infections. Here, we used three independent approaches to probe the capacity of SARS-CoV-2 to infect the brain. First, using human brain organoids, we observed clear evidence of infection with accompanying metabolic changes in infected and neighboring neurons. However, no evidence for type I interferon responses was detected. We demonstrate that neuronal infection can be prevented by blocking ACE2 with antibodies or by administering cerebrospinal fluid from a COVID-19 patient. Second, using mice overexpressing human ACE2, we demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 neuroinvasion in vivo. Finally, in autopsies from patients who died of COVID-19, we detect SARS-CoV-2 in cortical neurons and note pathological features associated with infection with minimal immune cell infiltrates. These results provide evidence for the neuroinvasive capacity of SARS-CoV-2 and an unexpected consequence of direct infection of neurons by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antibodies, Blocking/chemistry , COVID-19 , Cerebral Cortex , Neurons , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/pathology , Cerebral Cortex/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Middle Aged , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/virology , Organoids/metabolism , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology
16.
Viruses ; 13(1)2020 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004758

ABSTRACT

RNA viruses have gained plenty of attention during recent outbreaks of Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), Zika virus (ZIKV), and Ebola virus. ZIKV is a vector borne Flavivirus that is spread by mosquitoes and it mainly infects neuronal progenitor cells. One hallmark of congenital ZIKV disease is a reduced brain size in fetuses, leading to severe neurological defects. The World Health Organization (WHO) is urging the development of new antiviral treatments against ZIKV, as there are no efficient countermeasures against ZIKV disease. Previously, we presented a new class of host-targeting antivirals active against a number of pathogenic RNA viruses, such as SARS-CoV-2. Here, we show the transfer of the image-based phenotypic antiviral assay to ZIKV-infected brain cells, followed by mechanism-of-action studies and a proof-of-concept study in a three-dimensional (3D) organoid model. The novel antiviral compounds showed a therapeutic window against ZIKV in several cell models and rescued ZIKV-induced neurotoxicity in brain organoids. The compound's mechanism-of-action was pinpointed to late steps in the virus life cycle, impairing the formation of new virus particles. Collectively, in this study, we expand the antiviral activity of new small molecule inhibitors to a new virus class of Flaviviruses, but also uncover compounds' mechanism of action, which are important for the further development of antivirals.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brain/metabolism , Organoids/metabolism , Zika Virus Infection/metabolism , Zika Virus/drug effects , Animals , Brain/pathology , COVID-19 , Cell Survival/drug effects , Humans , Organoids/pathology , RNA Viruses , Ribavirin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/virology
17.
EMBO J ; 40(5): e105912, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962496

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure, and death. The alveolar epithelium is a major target of the virus, but representative models to study virus host interactions in more detail are currently lacking. Here, we describe a human 2D air-liquid interface culture system which was characterized by confocal and electron microscopy and single-cell mRNA expression analysis. In this model, alveolar cells, but also basal cells and rare neuroendocrine cells, are grown from 3D self-renewing fetal lung bud tip organoids. These cultures were readily infected by SARS-CoV-2 with mainly surfactant protein C-positive alveolar type II-like cells being targeted. Consequently, significant viral titers were detected and mRNA expression analysis revealed induction of type I/III interferon response program. Treatment of these cultures with a low dose of interferon lambda 1 reduced viral replication. Hence, these cultures represent an experimental model for SARS-CoV-2 infection and can be applied for drug screens.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Models, Biological , Organoids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Interferon Type I/biosynthesis , Interferons/biosynthesis , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , Vero Cells
18.
Nature ; 588(7839): 670-675, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943910

ABSTRACT

The distal lung contains terminal bronchioles and alveoli that facilitate gas exchange. Three-dimensional in vitro human distal lung culture systems would strongly facilitate the investigation of pathologies such as interstitial lung disease, cancer and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here we describe the development of a long-term feeder-free, chemically defined culture system for distal lung progenitors as organoids derived from single adult human alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) or KRT5+ basal cells. AT2 organoids were able to differentiate into AT1 cells, and basal cell organoids developed lumens lined with differentiated club and ciliated cells. Single-cell analysis of KRT5+ cells in basal organoids revealed a distinct population of ITGA6+ITGB4+ mitotic cells, whose offspring further segregated into a TNFRSF12Ahi subfraction that comprised about ten per cent of KRT5+ basal cells. This subpopulation formed clusters within terminal bronchioles and exhibited enriched clonogenic organoid growth activity. We created distal lung organoids with apical-out polarity to present ACE2 on the exposed external surface, facilitating infection of AT2 and basal cultures with SARS-CoV-2 and identifying club cells as a target population. This long-term, feeder-free culture of human distal lung organoids, coupled with single-cell analysis, identifies functional heterogeneity among basal cells and establishes a facile in vitro organoid model of human distal lung infections, including COVID-19-associated pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Lung/cytology , Models, Biological , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Differentiation , Cell Division , Clone Cells/cytology , Clone Cells/metabolism , Clone Cells/virology , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/growth & development , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Integrin alpha6/analysis , Integrin beta4/analysis , Keratin-5/analysis , Organoids/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Single-Cell Analysis , TWEAK Receptor/analysis
19.
Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 11(4): 935-948, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has spread worldwide and poses a severe health risk. While most patients present mild symptoms, descending pneumonia can lead to severe respiratory insufficiency. Up to 50% of patients show gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea or nausea, intriguingly associating with prolonged symptoms and increased severity. Thus, models to understand and validate drug efficiency in the gut of COVID-19 patients are of urgent need. METHODS: Human intestinal organoids derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSC-HIOs) have led, due to their complexity in mimicking human intestinal architecture, to an unprecedented number of successful disease models including gastrointestinal infections. Here, we employed PSC-HIOs to dissect SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and its inhibition by remdesivir, one of the leading drugs investigated for treatment of COVID-19. RESULTS: Immunostaining for viral entry receptor ACE2 and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein priming protease TMPRSS2 showed broad expression in the gastrointestinal tract with highest levels in the intestine, the latter faithfully recapitulated by PSC-HIOs. Organoids could be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2 followed by viral spread across entire PSC-HIOs, subsequently leading to organoid deterioration. However, SARS-CoV-2 spared goblet cells lacking ACE2 expression. Importantly, we challenged PSC-HIOs for drug testing capacity. Specifically, remdesivir effectively inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection dose-dependently at low micromolar concentration and rescued PSC-HIO morphology. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, PSC-HIOs are a valuable tool to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and to identify and validate drugs especially with potential action in the gut.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Human Embryonic Stem Cells , Intestinal Mucosa , Organoids , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/pharmacology , Caco-2 Cells , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/pathology , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/virology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Organoids/metabolism , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology
20.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 533(4): 1276-1282, 2020 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The whole world was hit hard by the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). Given that angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the viral entry molecule, understanding ACE2 has become a major focus of current COVID-19 research. ACE2 is highly expressed in the gut, but its role has not been fully understood and thus COVID-19 treatments intending to downregulate ACE2 level may cause untoward side effects. Gaining insight into the functions of ACE2 in gut homeostasis therefore merits closer examination, and is beneficial to find potential therapeutic alternatives for COVID-19. METHODS: We took advantage of Ace2 knockout out mice and isolated intestinal organoids to examine the role of ACE2 in intestinal stemness. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) mouse model was established by 4% dextran sodium sulfate. LGR5 and KI67 levels were quantitated to reflect the virtue of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). FITC-dextran 4 (FD-4) assay was used to assess intestinal barrier function. RESULTS: Western blotting identified the expression of ACE2 in colon, which was consistent with the results of immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Moreover, Ace2-/- organoids showed decreased LRG5 and KI67 levels, and elevated calcium concentration. Furthermore, the permeability of ace2-/- organoids was markedly increased compared with ace2+/+ organoids. Collectively, ace2-/- mice were more susceptible than ace2+/+ mice to IBD, including earlier bloody stool, undermined intestinal architecture and more pronounced weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: Our data reveal that ACE2 contributes to the proliferation of intestinal stem cells and hence orchestrates the mucosal homeostasis.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Epithelium/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/deficiency , Animals , Calcium/metabolism , Cell Membrane Permeability , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/enzymology , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/pathology , Intestines/pathology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Organoids/metabolism , Stem Cells/cytology , Stem Cells/metabolism
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