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1.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(4): 940-953, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180038

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection leading to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) usually results in respiratory disease, but extrapulmonary manifestations are of major clinical interest. Intestinal symptoms of COVID-19 are present in a significant number of patients, and include nausea, diarrhea, and viral RNA shedding in feces. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids (HIOs) represent an inexhaustible cellular resource that could serve as a valuable tool to study SARS-CoV-2 as well as other enteric viruses that infect the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report that SARS-CoV-2 productively infects both proximally and distally patterned HIOs, leading to the release of infectious viral particles while stimulating a robust transcriptomic response, including a significant upregulation of interferon-related genes that appeared to be conserved across multiple epithelial cell types. These findings illuminate a potential inflammatory epithelial-specific signature that may contribute to both the multisystemic nature of COVID-19 as well as its highly variable clinical presentation.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Colon/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Organoids/pathology , Cell Line , Colon/virology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Inflammation/virology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Models, Biological , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/virology , Virus Replication/physiology
2.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 412-418, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125251

ABSTRACT

Many pathogenic viruses that affect man display species specificity, limiting the use of animal models. Studying viral biology and identifying potential treatments therefore benefits from the development of in vitro cell systems that closely mimic human physiology. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, rapid scientific insights are of the utmost importance to limit its impact on public health and society. Organoids are emerging as versatile tools to progress the understanding of SARS-CoV-2 biology and to aid in the quest for novel treatments.


Subject(s)
/virology , Organoids/virology , Animals , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , /pathogenicity
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115421

ABSTRACT

In this Review, we briefly describe the basic virology and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2, highlighting how stem cell technology and organoids can contribute to the understanding of SARS-CoV-2 cell tropisms and the mechanism of disease in the human host, supporting and clarifying findings from clinical studies in infected individuals. We summarize here the results of studies, which used these technologies to investigate SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis in different organs. Studies with in vitro models of lung epithelia showed that alveolar epithelial type II cells, but not differentiated lung alveolar epithelial type I cells, are key targets of SARS-CoV-2, which triggers cell apoptosis and inflammation, while impairing surfactant production. Experiments with human small intestinal organoids and colonic organoids showed that the gastrointestinal tract is another relevant target for SARS-CoV-2. The virus can infect and replicate in enterocytes and cholangiocytes, inducing cell damage and inflammation. Direct viral damage was also demonstrated in in vitro models of human cardiomyocytes and choroid plexus epithelial cells. At variance, endothelial cells and neurons are poorly susceptible to viral infection, thus supporting the hypothesis that neurological symptoms and vascular damage result from the indirect effects of systemic inflammatory and immunological hyper-responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Organoids/virology , Stem Cells/virology , Animals , Apoptosis , Cardiovascular System/cytology , Cardiovascular System/pathology , Cardiovascular System/virology , Central Nervous System/cytology , Central Nervous System/pathology , Central Nervous System/virology , Gastrointestinal Tract/cytology , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/virology , Lung/cytology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Organoids/pathology , Stem Cells/pathology , Viral Tropism , Virus Internalization
4.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 373-384, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101516

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a socioeconomic burden, which exhibits respiratory illness along with unexpected neurological complications. Concerns have been raised about whether the observed neurological symptoms are due to direct effects on CNS or associated with the virus's systemic effect. Recent SARS-CoV-2 infection studies using human brain organoids revealed that SARS-CoV-2 targets human neurons. Human brain organoids are stem cell-derived reductionist experimental systems that have highlighted the neurotropic effects of SARS-CoV-2. Here, we summarize the neurotoxic effects of SARS-CoV-2 using brain organoids and comprehensively discuss how brain organoids could further improve our understanding when they are fine-tuned.


Subject(s)
Brain/virology , Neurons/virology , Organoids/virology , /pathogenicity , Humans , Stem Cells/virology
5.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 493-504, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099264

ABSTRACT

Enteroviruses, such as EV-A71 and CVA16, mainly infect the human gastrointestinal tract. Human coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, have been variably associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. We aimed to optimize the human intestinal organoids and hypothesize that these optimized intestinal organoids can recapitulate enteric infections of enterovirus and coronavirus. We demonstrate that the optimized human intestinal organoids enable better simulation of the native human intestinal epithelium, and that they are significantly more susceptible to EV-A71 than CVA16. Higher replication of EV-A71 than CVA16 in the intestinal organoids triggers a more vigorous cellular response. However, SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 exhibit distinct dynamics of virus-host interaction; more robust propagation of SARS-CoV triggers minimal cellular response, whereas, SARS-CoV-2 exhibits lower replication capacity but elicits a moderate cellular response. Taken together, the disparate profile of the virus-host interaction of enteroviruses and coronaviruses in human intestinal organoids may unravel the cellular basis of the distinct pathogenicity of these viral pathogens.


Subject(s)
/virology , Enterovirus A, Human/pathogenicity , Enterovirus Infections/virology , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , /pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/physiology
6.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 437-445, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084274

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a transmissible respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and has become a global health emergency. There is an urgent need for robust and practical in vitro model systems to investigate viral pathogenesis. Here, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived lung organoids (LORGs), cerebral organoids (CORGs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neurons, and astrocytes. LORGs containing epithelial cells, alveolar types 1 and 2, highly express ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 infection induces interferons, cytokines, and chemokines and activates critical inflammasome pathway genes. Spike protein inhibitor, EK1 peptide, and TMPRSS2 inhibitors (camostat/nafamostat) block viral entry in LORGs. Conversely, CORGs, NPCs, astrocytes, and neurons express low levels of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and correspondingly are not highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Infection in neuronal cells activates TLR3/7, OAS2, complement system, and apoptotic genes. These findings will aid in understanding COVID-19 pathogenesis and facilitate drug discovery.


Subject(s)
Brain/virology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Lung/virology , Neural Stem Cells/virology , Organoids/virology , /pathogenicity , Apoptosis/physiology , Brain/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Lung/metabolism , Neural Stem Cells/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/virology , Organoids/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Stem Cells/metabolism , Stem Cells/virology
7.
EMBO J ; 40(5): e107651, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082516

ABSTRACT

Defining the pulmonary cell types infected by SARS-CoV-2 and finding ways to prevent subsequent tissue damage are key goals for controlling COVID-19. Recent work establishing a human lung organoid-derived air-liquid interface model permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection identifies alveolar type II cells as the primary cell type infected, reports an infection-induced interferon response and demonstrates the effectiveness of interferon lambda 1 treatment in dampening lung infection.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Models, Biological , Organoids/metabolism , Virus Replication , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , /pathology , Humans , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology
8.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(4): e13191, 2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068062

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the agent that causes COVID-19, invades epithelial cells, including those of the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, using angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) as a receptor. Subsequent inflammation can promote rapid virus clearance, but severe cases of COVID-19 are characterized by an inefficient immune response that fails to clear the infection. Using primary epithelial organoids from human colon, we explored how the central antiviral mediator IFN-γ, which is elevated in COVID-19, affects epithelial cell differentiation, ACE2 expression, and susceptibility to infection with SARS-CoV-2. In mouse and human colon, ACE2 is mainly expressed by surface enterocytes. Inducing enterocyte differentiation in organoid culture resulted in increased ACE2 production. IFN-γ treatment promoted differentiation into mature KRT20+ enterocytes expressing high levels of ACE2, increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and resulted in enhanced virus production in infected cells. Similarly, infection-induced epithelial interferon signaling promoted enterocyte maturation and enhanced ACE2 expression. We here reveal a mechanism by which IFN-γ-driven inflammatory responses induce a vulnerable epithelial state with robust replication of SARS-CoV-2, which may have an impact on disease outcome and virus transmission.


Subject(s)
/etiology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Models, Immunological , /genetics , Animals , /pathology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Colon/immunology , Colon/pathology , Colon/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/administration & dosage , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Mice , Organoids/immunology , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , /immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
9.
Elife ; 102021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063492

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus entry is mediated by the spike protein that binds the receptor and mediates fusion after cleavage by host proteases. The proteases that mediate entry differ between cell lines, and it is currently unclear which proteases are relevant in vivo. A remarkable feature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike is the presence of a multibasic cleavage site (MBCS), which is absent in the SARS-CoV spike. Here, we report that the SARS-CoV-2 spike MBCS increases infectivity on human airway organoids (hAOs). Compared with SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 entered faster into Calu-3 cells and, more frequently, formed syncytia in hAOs. Moreover, the MBCS increased entry speed and plasma membrane serine protease usage relative to cathepsin-mediated endosomal entry. Blocking serine proteases, but not cathepsins, effectively inhibited SARS-CoV-2 entry and replication in hAOs. Our findings demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 enters relevant airway cells using serine proteases, and suggest that the MBCS is an adaptation to this viral entry strategy.


Subject(s)
Organoids/virology , Respiratory System/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Internalization , Amino Acid Motifs , Animals , Cell Fusion , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases , Vero Cells
10.
J Exp Med ; 218(3)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024074

ABSTRACT

Although COVID-19 is considered to be primarily a respiratory disease, SARS-CoV-2 affects multiple organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS). Yet, there is no consensus on the consequences of CNS infections. Here, we used three independent approaches to probe the capacity of SARS-CoV-2 to infect the brain. First, using human brain organoids, we observed clear evidence of infection with accompanying metabolic changes in infected and neighboring neurons. However, no evidence for type I interferon responses was detected. We demonstrate that neuronal infection can be prevented by blocking ACE2 with antibodies or by administering cerebrospinal fluid from a COVID-19 patient. Second, using mice overexpressing human ACE2, we demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 neuroinvasion in vivo. Finally, in autopsies from patients who died of COVID-19, we detect SARS-CoV-2 in cortical neurons and note pathological features associated with infection with minimal immune cell infiltrates. These results provide evidence for the neuroinvasive capacity of SARS-CoV-2 and an unexpected consequence of direct infection of neurons by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Blocking/chemistry , Cerebral Cortex , Neurons , /metabolism , /antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , /pathology , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/pathology , Cerebral Cortex/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Middle Aged , Neurons/metabolism , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/virology , Organoids/metabolism , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology
11.
Cell Stem Cell ; 28(2): 331-342.e5, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009887

ABSTRACT

ApoE4, a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease, has been associated with increased risk for severe COVID-19. However, it is unclear whether ApoE4 alters COVID-19 susceptibility or severity, and the role of direct viral infection in brain cells remains obscure. We tested the neurotropism of SARS-CoV2 in human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) models and observed low-grade infection of neurons and astrocytes that is boosted in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures and organoids. We then generated isogenic ApoE3/3 and ApoE4/4 hiPSCs and found an increased rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection in ApoE4/4 neurons and astrocytes. ApoE4 astrocytes exhibited enlarged size and elevated nuclear fragmentation upon SARS-CoV-2 infection. Finally, we show that remdesivir treatment inhibits SARS-CoV2 infection of hiPSC neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that ApoE4 may play a causal role in COVID-19 severity. Understanding how risk factors impact COVID-19 susceptibility and severity will help us understand the potential long-term effects in different patient populations.


Subject(s)
Apolipoproteins E/metabolism , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Tropism/physiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Astrocytes/drug effects , Astrocytes/pathology , Astrocytes/virology , Cell Differentiation , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Nerve Degeneration/pathology , Neurites/pathology , Neurons/drug effects , Neurons/pathology , Neurons/virology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Synapses/pathology , Vero Cells
12.
EMBO J ; 39(21): e106057, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846583

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-CoV-2 and has spread across the globe. SARS-CoV-2 is a highly infectious virus with no vaccine or antiviral therapy available to control the pandemic; therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and the host immune responses to SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 is a new member of the betacoronavirus genus like other closely related viruses including SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Both SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have caused serious outbreaks and epidemics in the past eighteen years. Here, we report that one of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H), is induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in COVID-19-infected patients. CH25H converts cholesterol to 25-hydrocholesterol (25HC) and 25HC shows broad anti-coronavirus activity by blocking membrane fusion. Furthermore, 25HC inhibits USA-WA1/2020 SARS-CoV-2 infection in lung epithelial cells and viral entry in human lung organoids. Mechanistically, 25HC inhibits viral membrane fusion by activating the ER-localized acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) which leads to the depletion of accessible cholesterol from the plasma membrane. Altogether, our results shed light on a potentially broad antiviral mechanism by 25HC through depleting accessible cholesterol on the plasma membrane to suppress virus-cell fusion. Since 25HC is a natural product with no known toxicity at effective concentrations, it provides a potential therapeutic candidate for COVID-19 and emerging viral diseases in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cholesterol/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Steroid Hydroxylases/pharmacology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Acetyl-CoA C-Acetyltransferase/metabolism , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Respiratory Mucosa/drug effects , SARS Virus/drug effects , Vero Cells
13.
Viruses ; 12(9)2020 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760952

ABSTRACT

Since the global outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), infections of diverse human organs along with multiple symptoms continue to be reported. However, the susceptibility of the brain to SARS-CoV-2, and the mechanisms underlying neurological infection are still elusive. Here, we utilized human embryonic stem cell-derived brain organoids and monolayer cortical neurons to investigate infection of brain with pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 viral particles. Spike-containing SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus infected neural layers within brain organoids. The expression of ACE2, a host cell receptor for SARS-CoV-2, was sustained during the development of brain organoids, especially in the somas of mature neurons, while remaining rare in neural stem cells. However, pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 was observed in the axon of neurons, which lack ACE2. Neural infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus did not increase in proportion to viral load, but only 10% of neurons were infected. Our findings demonstrate that brain organoids provide a useful model for investigating SARS-CoV-2 entry into the human brain and elucidating the susceptibility of the brain to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Neurons/virology , Organoids/virology , Prosencephalon/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Axons/enzymology , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Cerebral Cortex/cytology , Embryonic Stem Cells/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Nerve Tissue Proteins/physiology , Neural Stem Cells/enzymology , Neural Stem Cells/virology , Neurons/enzymology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Prosencephalon/cytology , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Viral Load , Viral Tropism , Virus Internalization
14.
ACS Chem Neurosci ; 11(17): 2489-2491, 2020 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728963

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a severe public health problem with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. A mounting number of clinical investigations illustrate that COVID-19 patients suffer from neurologic conditions in addition to respiratory symptoms. In a recent article, Yuen and colleagues present the first experimental evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the human central nervous system using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived platform including human neural progenitor cells, neurospheres, and three-dimensional brain organoids (Yuen, K.Y., and Huang, J.D. et al. (2020) Cell Res. DOI: 10.1038/s41422-020-0390-x).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Brain/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Brain/virology , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , Pandemics
15.
Mucosal Immunol ; 13(6): 877-891, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724735

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is causing a major once-in-a-century global pandemic. The scientific and clinical community is in a race to define and develop effective preventions and treatments. The major features of disease are described but clinical trials have been hampered by competing interests, small scale, lack of defined patient cohorts and defined readouts. What is needed now is head-to-head comparison of existing drugs, testing of safety including in the background of predisposing chronic diseases, and the development of new and targeted preventions and treatments. This is most efficiently achieved using representative animal models of primary infection including in the background of chronic disease with validation of findings in primary human cells and tissues. We explore and discuss the diverse animal, cell and tissue models that are being used and developed and collectively recapitulate many critical aspects of disease manifestation in humans to develop and test new preventions and treatments.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Viral Vaccines/biosynthesis , Animals , Animals, Genetically Modified , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Cats , Chiroptera , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cricetulus , Female , Ferrets , Haplorhini , Humans , Male , Mice , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/immunology , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage
17.
Theranostics ; 10(16): 7034-7052, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638462

ABSTRACT

This review provides an update for the international research community on the cell modeling tools that could accelerate the understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection mechanisms and could thus speed up the development of vaccines and therapeutic agents against COVID-19. Many bioengineering groups are actively developing frontier tools that are capable of providing realistic three-dimensional (3D) models for biological research, including cell culture scaffolds, microfluidic chambers for the culture of tissue equivalents and organoids, and implantable windows for intravital imaging. Here, we review the most innovative study models based on these bioengineering tools in the context of virology and vaccinology. To make it easier for scientists working on SARS-CoV-2 to identify and apply specific tools, we discuss how they could accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of antiviral drugs and vaccines, compared to conventional models.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/isolation & purification , Viral Vaccines/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Bioengineering/methods , Bioengineering/trends , Bioreactors , Cell Culture Techniques , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Drug Discovery/methods , Drug Discovery/trends , Drug Evaluation/methods , Drug Evaluation/trends , Drug Resistance, Viral , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Models, Biological , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Theranostic Nanomedicine
18.
Cell Stem Cell ; 27(1): 125-136.e7, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610467

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has caused the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need for physiological models to study SARS-CoV-2 infection using human disease-relevant cells. COVID-19 pathophysiology includes respiratory failure but involves other organ systems including gut, liver, heart, and pancreas. We present an experimental platform comprised of cell and organoid derivatives from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). A Spike-enabled pseudo-entry virus infects pancreatic endocrine cells, liver organoids, cardiomyocytes, and dopaminergic neurons. Recent clinical studies show a strong association with COVID-19 and diabetes. We find that human pancreatic beta cells and liver organoids are highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection, further validated using adult primary human islets and adult hepatocyte and cholangiocyte organoids. SARS-CoV-2 infection caused striking expression of chemokines, as also seen in primary human COVID-19 pulmonary autopsy samples. hPSC-derived cells/organoids provide valuable models for understanding the cellular responses of human tissues to SARS-CoV-2 infection and for disease modeling of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Models, Biological , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Tropism , Animals , Autopsy , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Hepatocytes/pathology , Hepatocytes/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Liver/pathology , Mice , Pancreas/pathology , Pancreas/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Virus Internalization
19.
Trends Pharmacol Sci ; 41(8): 513-517, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-457060

ABSTRACT

Basic research on SARS-CoV-2 is essential to understand its detailed pathophysiology and identify best drug targets. Models that can faithfully reproduce the viral life cycle and reproduce the pathology of COVID-19 are required. Here, we briefly review the cell lines, organoids, and animal models that are currently being used in COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biomedical Research/methods , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
20.
Nat Med ; 26(7): 1077-1083, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260261

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-emerged in humans in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has since disseminated globally1,2. As of April 16, 2020, the confirmed case count of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had surpassed 2 million. Based on full-genome sequence analysis, SARS-CoV-2 shows high homology to SARS-related coronaviruses identified in horseshoe bats1,2. Here we show the establishment and characterization of expandable intestinal organoids derived from horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus sinicus species that can recapitulate bat intestinal epithelium. These bat enteroids are fully susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and sustain robust viral replication. Development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients with COVID-19 and detection of viral RNA in fecal specimens suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might cause enteric, in addition to respiratory, infection3,4. Here we demonstrate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in human intestinal organoids and isolation of infectious virus from the stool specimen of a patient with diarrheal COVID-19. Collectively, we established the first expandable organoid culture system of bat intestinal epithelium and present evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect bat intestinal cells. The robust SARS-CoV-2 replication in human intestinal organoids suggests that the human intestinal tract might be a transmission route of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Animals , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Child, Preschool , Chiroptera/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Intestines/pathology , Male , Organoids/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Vero Cells , Viral Load/genetics , Viral Load/methods , Viral Tropism/physiology
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