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1.
Theranostics ; 10(16): 7034-7052, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638462

ABSTRACT

This review provides an update for the international research community on the cell modeling tools that could accelerate the understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection mechanisms and could thus speed up the development of vaccines and therapeutic agents against COVID-19. Many bioengineering groups are actively developing frontier tools that are capable of providing realistic three-dimensional (3D) models for biological research, including cell culture scaffolds, microfluidic chambers for the culture of tissue equivalents and organoids, and implantable windows for intravital imaging. Here, we review the most innovative study models based on these bioengineering tools in the context of virology and vaccinology. To make it easier for scientists working on SARS-CoV-2 to identify and apply specific tools, we discuss how they could accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of antiviral drugs and vaccines, compared to conventional models.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/isolation & purification , Viral Vaccines/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Bioengineering/methods , Bioengineering/trends , Bioreactors , Cell Culture Techniques , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Drug Discovery/methods , Drug Discovery/trends , Drug Evaluation/methods , Drug Evaluation/trends , Drug Resistance, Viral , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Models, Biological , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Theranostic Nanomedicine
2.
Cell Stem Cell ; 27(1): 125-136.e7, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610467

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has caused the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need for physiological models to study SARS-CoV-2 infection using human disease-relevant cells. COVID-19 pathophysiology includes respiratory failure but involves other organ systems including gut, liver, heart, and pancreas. We present an experimental platform comprised of cell and organoid derivatives from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). A Spike-enabled pseudo-entry virus infects pancreatic endocrine cells, liver organoids, cardiomyocytes, and dopaminergic neurons. Recent clinical studies show a strong association with COVID-19 and diabetes. We find that human pancreatic beta cells and liver organoids are highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection, further validated using adult primary human islets and adult hepatocyte and cholangiocyte organoids. SARS-CoV-2 infection caused striking expression of chemokines, as also seen in primary human COVID-19 pulmonary autopsy samples. hPSC-derived cells/organoids provide valuable models for understanding the cellular responses of human tissues to SARS-CoV-2 infection and for disease modeling of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Models, Biological , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Tropism , Animals , Autopsy , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Hepatocytes/pathology , Hepatocytes/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Liver/pathology , Mice , Pancreas/pathology , Pancreas/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Virus Internalization
3.
Trends Pharmacol Sci ; 41(8): 513-517, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-457060

ABSTRACT

Basic research on SARS-CoV-2 is essential to understand its detailed pathophysiology and identify best drug targets. Models that can faithfully reproduce the viral life cycle and reproduce the pathology of COVID-19 are required. Here, we briefly review the cell lines, organoids, and animal models that are currently being used in COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biomedical Research/methods , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
4.
Nat Med ; 26(7): 1077-1083, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260261

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-emerged in humans in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has since disseminated globally1,2. As of April 16, 2020, the confirmed case count of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had surpassed 2 million. Based on full-genome sequence analysis, SARS-CoV-2 shows high homology to SARS-related coronaviruses identified in horseshoe bats1,2. Here we show the establishment and characterization of expandable intestinal organoids derived from horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus sinicus species that can recapitulate bat intestinal epithelium. These bat enteroids are fully susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and sustain robust viral replication. Development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients with COVID-19 and detection of viral RNA in fecal specimens suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might cause enteric, in addition to respiratory, infection3,4. Here we demonstrate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in human intestinal organoids and isolation of infectious virus from the stool specimen of a patient with diarrheal COVID-19. Collectively, we established the first expandable organoid culture system of bat intestinal epithelium and present evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect bat intestinal cells. The robust SARS-CoV-2 replication in human intestinal organoids suggests that the human intestinal tract might be a transmission route of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Animals , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Child, Preschool , Chiroptera/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Intestines/pathology , Male , Organoids/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Vero Cells , Viral Load/genetics , Viral Load/methods , Viral Tropism/physiology
5.
Sci Immunol ; 5(47)2020 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260039

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal symptoms and fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 RNA are frequently observed in COVID-19 patients. However, it is unclear whether SARS-CoV-2 replicates in the human intestine and contributes to possible fecal-oral transmission. Here, we report productive infection of SARS-CoV-2 in ACE2+ mature enterocytes in human small intestinal enteroids. Expression of two mucosa-specific serine proteases, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4, facilitated SARS-CoV-2 spike fusogenic activity and promoted virus entry into host cells. We also demonstrate that viruses released into the intestinal lumen were inactivated by simulated human colonic fluid, and infectious virus was not recovered from the stool specimens of COVID-19 patients. Our results highlight the intestine as a potential site of SARS-CoV-2 replication, which may contribute to local and systemic illness and overall disease progression.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Animals , Cell Line , Duodenum/cytology , Enterocytes/pathology , Humans , Mice , Organoids/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Rotavirus/physiology , Vesiculovirus/genetics
6.
Cell ; 181(4): 905-913.e7, 2020 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30638

ABSTRACT

We have previously provided the first genetic evidence that angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the critical receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and ACE2 protects the lung from injury, providing a molecular explanation for the severe lung failure and death due to SARS-CoV infections. ACE2 has now also been identified as a key receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infections, and it has been proposed that inhibiting this interaction might be used in treating patients with COVID-19. However, it is not known whether human recombinant soluble ACE2 (hrsACE2) blocks growth of SARS-CoV-2. Here, we show that clinical grade hrsACE2 reduced SARS-CoV-2 recovery from Vero cells by a factor of 1,000-5,000. An equivalent mouse rsACE2 had no effect. We also show that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect engineered human blood vessel organoids and human kidney organoids, which can be inhibited by hrsACE2. These data demonstrate that hrsACE2 can significantly block early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , Blood Vessels/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Kidney/cytology , Kidney/virology , Mice , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells
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