Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 25
Filter
2.
J Virol ; 96(5): e0179121, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799229

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and seasonal influenza viruses are cocirculating in the human population. However, only a few cases of viral coinfection with these two viruses have been documented in humans with some people having severe disease and others mild disease. To examine this phenomenon, ferrets were coinfected with SARS-CoV-2 and human seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs; H1N1 or H3N2) and were compared to animals that received each virus alone. Ferrets were either immunologically naive to both viruses or vaccinated with the 2019 to 2020 split-inactivated influenza virus vaccine. Coinfected naive ferrets lost significantly more body weight than ferrets infected with each virus alone and had more severe inflammation in both the nose and lungs compared to that of ferrets that were single infected with each virus. Coinfected, naive animals had predominantly higher IAV titers than SARS-CoV-2 titers, and IAVs were efficiently transmitted by direct contact to the cohoused ferrets. Comparatively, SARS-CoV-2 failed to transmit to the ferrets that cohoused with coinfected ferrets by direct contact. Moreover, vaccination significantly reduced IAV titers and shortened the viral shedding but did not completely block direct contact transmission of the influenza virus. Notably, vaccination significantly ameliorated influenza-associated disease by protecting vaccinated animals from severe morbidity after IAV single infection or IAV and SARS-CoV-2 coinfection, suggesting that seasonal influenza virus vaccination is pivotal to prevent severe disease induced by IAV and SARS-CoV-2 coinfection during the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses cause severe morbidity and mortality during each influenza virus season. The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the human population offers the opportunity to potential coinfections of both viruses. The development of useful animal models to assess the pathogenesis, transmission, and viral evolution of these viruses as they coinfect a host is of critical importance for the development of vaccines and therapeutics. The ability to prevent the most severe effects of viral coinfections can be studied using effect coinfection ferret models described in this report.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coinfection/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Ferrets/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Vaccination , Virus Shedding
3.
J Virol ; 96(4): e0157821, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759290

ABSTRACT

The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic poses a severe global threat to public health, as do influenza viruses and other coronaviruses. Here, we present chimpanzee adenovirus 68 (AdC68)-based vaccines designed to universally target coronaviruses and influenza. Our design is centered on an immunogen generated by fusing the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) to the conserved stalk of H7N9 hemagglutinin (HA). Remarkably, the constructed vaccine effectively induced both SARS-CoV-2-targeting antibodies and anti-influenza antibodies in mice, consequently affording protection from lethal SARS-CoV-2 and H7N9 challenges as well as effective H3N2 control. We propose our AdC68-vectored coronavirus-influenza vaccine as a universal approach toward curbing respiratory virus-causing pandemics. IMPORTANCE The COVID-19 pandemic exemplifies the severe public health threats of respiratory virus infection and influenza A viruses. The currently envisioned strategy for the prevention of respiratory virus-causing diseases requires the comprehensive administration of vaccines tailored for individual viruses. Here, we present an alternative strategy by designing chimpanzee adenovirus 68-based vaccines which target both the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding-domain and the conserved stalk of influenza hemagglutinin. When tested in mice, this strategy attained potent neutralizing antibodies against wild-type SARS-CoV-2 and its emerging variants, enabling an effective protection against lethal SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Notably, it also provided complete protection from lethal H7N9 challenge and efficient control of H3N2-induced morbidity. Our study opens a new avenue to universally curb respiratory virus infection by vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/immunology , Influenza Vaccines , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , /immunology , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred ICR , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(13): e2025607119, 2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758459

ABSTRACT

SignificanceAlthough the need for a universal influenza vaccine has long been recognized, only a handful of candidates have been identified so far, with even fewer advancing in the clinical pipeline. The 24-amino acid ectodomain of M2 protein (M2e) has been developed over the past two decades. However, M2e-based vaccine candidates have shortcomings, including the need for several administrations and the lack of sustained antibody titers over time. We report here a vaccine targeting strategy that has the potential to confer sustained and strong protection upon a single shot of a small amount of M2e antigen. The current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of developing versatile, powerful platforms for the rapid deployment of vaccines against any incoming threat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A virus , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Viral Matrix Proteins , Viroporin Proteins , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Humans , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology , Viroporin Proteins/immunology
5.
Nanoscale ; 14(8): 3250-3260, 2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684132

ABSTRACT

Various vaccine strategies have been developed to provide broad protection against diverse influenza viruses. The hemagglutinin (HA) stem is the major potential target of these vaccines. Enhancing immunogenicity and eliciting cross-protective immune responses are critical for HA stem-based vaccine designs. In this study, the A helix (Ah) and CD helix (CDh) from the HA stem were fused with ferritin, individually, or in tandem, yielding Ah-f, CDh-f and (A + CD)h-f nanoparticles (NPs), respectively. These NPs were produced through a prokaryotic expression system. After three immunizations with AS03-adjuvanted NPs in BALB/c mice via the subcutaneous route, CDh-f and (A + CD)h-f induced robust humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, CDh-f and (A + CD)h-f conferred complete protection against a lethal challenge of H3N2 virus, while no remarkable immune responses and protective effects were detected in the Ah-f group. These results indicate that the CDh-based nanovaccine represents a promising vaccine platform against influenza, and the epitope-conjugated ferritin NPs may be a potential vaccine platform against other infectious viruses, such as SARS-COV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Nanoparticles , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Epitopes , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus , Hemagglutinins , Humans , Immunity , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674673

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic caused a massive health and societal crisis, although the fast development of effective vaccines reduced some of the impact. To prepare for future respiratory virus pandemics, a pan-viral prophylaxis could be used to control the initial virus outbreak in the period prior to vaccine approval. The liposomal vaccine adjuvant CAF®09b contains the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, which induces a type I interferon (IFN-I) response and an antiviral state in the affected tissues. When testing CAF09b liposomes as a potential pan-viral prophylaxis, we observed that intranasal administration of CAF09b liposomes to mice resulted in an influx of innate immune cells into the nose and lungs and upregulation of IFN-I-related gene expression. When CAF09b liposomes were administered prior to challenge with mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 virus, it protected from severe disease, although the virus was still detectable in the lungs. However, when CAF09b liposomes were administered after influenza challenge, the mice had a similar disease course to controls. In conclusion, CAF09b may be a suitable candidate as a pan-viral prophylactic treatment for epidemic viruses, but must be administered prior to virus exposure to be effective.


Subject(s)
/therapeutic use , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , /methods , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Adjuvants, Immunologic/therapeutic use , /chemistry , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemical synthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cells, Cultured , Chick Embryo , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza Vaccines/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Liposomes/chemistry , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Primary Prevention/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
7.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 19(2): 234-244, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612184

ABSTRACT

Global pandemics caused by influenza or coronaviruses cause severe disruptions to public health and lead to high morbidity and mortality. There remains a medical need for vaccines against these pathogens. CMV (cytomegalovirus) is a ß-herpesvirus that induces uniquely robust immune responses in which remarkably large populations of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells are maintained for a lifetime. Hence, CMV has been proposed and investigated as a novel vaccine vector for expressing antigenic peptides or proteins to elicit protective cellular immune responses against numerous pathogens. We generated two recombinant murine CMV (MCMV) vaccine vectors expressing hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (MCMVHA) or the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (MCMVS). A single injection of MCMVs expressing either viral protein induced potent neutralizing antibody responses, which strengthened over time. Importantly, MCMVHA-vaccinated mice were protected from illness following challenge with the influenza virus, and we excluded that this protection was due to the effects of memory T cells. Conclusively, we show here that MCMV vectors induce not only long-term cellular immunity but also humoral responses that provide long-term immune protection against clinically relevant respiratory pathogens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytomegalovirus/immunology , Dogs , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Vero Cells
8.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 68(6): 3349-3359, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526423

ABSTRACT

The influenza D virus (IDV) was first identified and characterized in 2011. Considering the virus' zoonotic potential, its genome nature (segmented RNA virus), its worldwide circulation in livestock and its role in bovine respiratory disease, an increased interest is given to IDV. However, few data are available on drivers of emergence of IDV. We first listed fifty possible drivers of emergence of IDV in ruminants and swine. As recently carried out for COVID-19 in pets (Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 2020), a scoring system was developed per driver and scientific experts (N = 28) were elicited to (a) allocate a score to each driver, (b) weight the drivers' scores within each domain and (c) weight the different domains among themselves. An overall weighted score was calculated per driver, and drivers were ranked in decreasing order. Drivers with comparable likelihoods to play a role in the emergence of IDV in ruminants and swine in Europe were grouped using a regression tree analysis. Finally, the robustness of the expert elicitation was verified. Eight drivers were ranked with the highest probability to play a key role in the emergence of IDV: current species specificity of the causing agent of the disease; influence of (il)legal movements of live animals (ruminants, swine) from neighbouring/European Union member states and from third countries for the disease to (re-)emerge in a given country; detection of emergence; current knowledge of the pathogen; vaccine availability; animal density; and transport vehicles of live animals. As there is still limited scientific knowledge on the topic, expert elicitation of knowledge and multi-criteria decision analysis, in addition to clustering and sensitivity analyses, are very important to prioritize future studies, starting from the top eight drivers. The present methodology could be applied to other emerging animal diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Swine Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cattle , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine , Swine Diseases/epidemiology , Swine Diseases/prevention & control
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22164, 2021 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514425

ABSTRACT

The influenza A non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is known for its ability to hinder the synthesis of type I interferon (IFN) during viral infection. Influenza viruses lacking NS1 (ΔNS1) are under clinical development as live attenuated human influenza virus vaccines and induce potent influenza virus-specific humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. Attenuation of ΔNS1 influenza viruses is due to their high IFN inducing properties, that limit their replication in vivo. This study demonstrates that pre-treatment with a ΔNS1 virus results in an antiviral state which prevents subsequent replication of homologous and heterologous viruses, preventing disease from virus respiratory pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2. Our studies suggest that ΔNS1 influenza viruses could be used for the prophylaxis of influenza, SARS-CoV-2 and other human respiratory viral infections, and that an influenza virus vaccine based on ΔNS1 live attenuated viruses would confer broad protection against influenza virus infection from the moment of administration, first by non-specific innate immune induction, followed by specific adaptive immunity.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Interferon Type I/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Vaccines, Attenuated/therapeutic use , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chickens , Gene Deletion , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
10.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0053021, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486507

ABSTRACT

Elicitation of lung tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells (TRMs) is a goal of T cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, such as influenza A virus (IAV). C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-dependent monocyte trafficking plays an essential role in the establishment of CD8 TRMs in lungs of IAV-infected mice. Here, we used a combination adjuvant-based subunit vaccine strategy that evokes multifaceted (TC1/TC17/TH1/TH17) IAV nucleoprotein-specific lung TRMs to determine whether CCR2 and monocyte infiltration are essential for vaccine-induced TRM development and protective immunity to IAV in lungs. Following intranasal vaccination, neutrophils, monocytes, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived dendritic cells internalized and processed vaccine antigen in lungs. We found that basic leucine zipper ATF-like transcription factor 3 (BATF3)-dependent DCs were essential for eliciting T cell responses, but CCR2 deficiency enhanced the differentiation of CD127hi, KLRG-1lo, OX40+ve CD62L+ve, and mucosally imprinted CD69+ve CD103+ve effector and memory CD8 T cells in lungs and airways of vaccinated mice. Mechanistically, increased development of lung TRMs induced by CCR2 deficiency was linked to dampened expression of T-bet but not altered TCF-1 levels or T cell receptor signaling in CD8 T cells. T1/T17 functional programming, parenchymal localization of CD8/CD4 effector and memory T cells, recall T cell responses, and protective immunity to a lethal IAV infection were unaffected in CCR2-deficient mice. Taken together, we identified a negative regulatory role for CCR2 and monocyte trafficking in mucosal imprinting and differentiation of vaccine-induced TRMs. Mechanistic insights from this study may aid the development of T-cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, including IAV and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). IMPORTANCE While antibody-based immunity to influenza A virus (IAV) is type and subtype specific, lung- and airway-resident memory T cells that recognize conserved epitopes in the internal viral proteins are known to provide heterosubtypic immunity. Hence, broadly protective IAV vaccines need to elicit robust T cell memory in the respiratory tract. We have developed a combination adjuvant-based IAV nucleoprotein vaccine that elicits strong CD4 and CD8 T cell memory in lungs and protects against H1N1 and H5N1 strains of IAV. In this study, we examined the mechanisms that control vaccine-induced protective memory T cells in the respiratory tract. We found that trafficking of monocytes into lungs might limit the development of antiviral lung-resident memory T cells following intranasal vaccination. These findings suggest that strategies that limit monocyte infiltration can potentiate vaccine-induced frontline T-cell immunity to respiratory viruses, such as IAV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal , Immunologic Memory , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Receptors, CCR2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Animals , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Lung/immunology , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Receptors, CCR2/genetics
11.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 8(23): e2100118, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482096

ABSTRACT

Recently, viral infectious diseases, including COVID-19 and Influenza, are the subjects of major concerns worldwide. One strategy for addressing these concerns focuses on nasal vaccines, which have great potential for achieving successful immunization via safe, easy, and affordable approaches. However, conventional nasal vaccines have major limitations resulting from fast removal when pass through nasal mucosa and mucociliary clearance hindering their effectiveness. Herein a nanoparticulate vaccine (NanoVac) exhibiting photochemical immunomodulation and constituting a new self-assembled immunization system of a photoactivatable polymeric adjuvant with influenza virus hemagglutinin for efficient nasal delivery and antigen-specific immunity against pathogenic influenza viruses is described. NanoVac increases the residence period of antigens and further enhances by spatiotemporal photochemical modulation in the nasal cavity. As a consequence, photochemical immunomodulation of NanoVacs successfully induces humoral and cellular immune responses followed by stimulation of mature dendritic cells, plasma cells, memory B cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, resulting in secretion of antigen-specific immunoglobulins, cytokines, and CD8+ T cells. Notably, challenge with influenza virus after nasal immunization with NanoVacs demonstrates robust prevention of viral infection. Thus, this newly designed vaccine system can serve as a promising strategy for developing vaccines that are active against current hazardous pathogen outbreaks and pandemics.


Subject(s)
Hemagglutinins/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Light , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Animals , Antigens/administration & dosage , Antigens/chemistry , Antigens/immunology , Dendritic Cells/cytology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Hemagglutinins/administration & dosage , Hemagglutinins/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Influenza Vaccines/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry
12.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0043021, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398597

ABSTRACT

Measures intended to limit the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus at the start of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in a rapid decrease in other respiratory pathogens. Herein, we describe the trends of respiratory pathogens in a major metropolitan health care system central microbiology reference laboratory before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, with attention to when COVID-19 mitigation measures were implemented and relaxed. During the initial lockdown period, COVID-19 was the primary respiratory pathogen detected by multiplex respiratory panels. As COVID-19 containment measures were relaxed, the first non-COVID respiratory viruses to return to prepandemic levels were members of the rhinovirus/enterovirus family. After the complete removal of COVID-19 precautions at the state level, including an end to mask mandates, we observed the robust return of seasonal coronaviruses, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. Inasmuch as COVID-19 has dominated the landscape of respiratory infections since early 2020, it is important for clinicians to recognize that the return of non-COVID respiratory pathogens may be rapid and significant when COVID-19 containment measures are removed. IMPORTANCE We describe the return of non-COVID respiratory viruses after the removal of COVID-19 mitigation measures. It is important for the public and physicians to recognize that, after months of COVID-19 being the primary driver of respiratory infection, more typical seasonal respiratory illnesses have returned, and this return is out of the normal season for some of these pathogens. Thus, clinicians and the public must now consider both COVID-19 and other respiratory illnesses when a patient presents with symptomatic respiratory illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Coxsackievirus Infections/epidemiology , Coxsackievirus Infections/prevention & control , Enterovirus/isolation & purification , Humans , Mandatory Programs/statistics & numerical data , Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology , Picornaviridae Infections/prevention & control , Rhinovirus/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Texas/epidemiology
13.
Adv Healthc Mater ; 10(10): e2002142, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384090

ABSTRACT

Despite remarkable successes of immunization in protecting public health, safe and effective vaccines against a number of life-threatening pathogens such as HIV, ebola, influenza, and SARS-CoV-2 remain urgently needed. Subunit vaccines can avoid potential toxicity associated with traditional whole virion-inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines; however, the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines is often poor. A facile method is here reported to produce lipid nanoparticle subunit vaccines that exhibit high immunogenicity and elicit protection against influenza virus. Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) immunogens are functionalized on the surface of liposomes via stable metal chelation chemistry, using a scalable advanced microfluidic mixing technology (NanoAssemblr). Immunization of mice with HA-liposomes elicits increased serum antibody titers and superior protection against highly pathogenic virus challenge compared with free HA protein. HA-liposomal vaccines display enhanced antigen deposition into germinal centers within the draining lymph nodes, driving increased HA-specific B cell, and follicular helper T cell responses. This work provides mechanistic insights into highly protective HA-liposome vaccines and informs the rational design and rapid production of next generation nanoparticle subunit vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Germinal Center , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus , Hemagglutinins , Humans , Liposomes , Mice , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer
14.
mBio ; 12(4): e0159821, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360544

ABSTRACT

The gut microbiota plays a critical role in the induction of adaptive immune responses to influenza virus infection. However, the role of nasal bacteria in the induction of the virus-specific adaptive immunity is less clear. Here, we found that disruption of nasal bacteria by intranasal application of antibiotics before influenza virus infection enhanced the virus-specific antibody response in a MyD88-dependent manner. Similarly, disruption of nasal bacteria by lysozyme enhanced antibody responses to intranasally administered influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine in a MyD88-dependent manner, suggesting that intranasal application of antibiotics or lysozyme could release bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from disrupted nasal bacteria that act as mucosal adjuvants by activating the MyD88 signaling pathway. Since commensal bacteria in the nasal mucosal surface were significantly lower than those in the oral cavity, intranasal administration of HA vaccine alone was insufficient to induce the vaccine-specific antibody response. However, intranasal supplementation of cultured oral bacteria from a healthy human volunteer enhanced antibody responses to an intranasally administered HA vaccine. Finally, we demonstrated that oral bacteria combined with an intranasal vaccine protect from influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Our results reveal the role of nasal bacteria in the induction of the virus-specific adaptive immunity and provide clues for developing better intranasal vaccines. IMPORTANCE Intranasal vaccination induces the nasal IgA antibody which is protective against respiratory viruses, such as influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Therefore, understanding how mucosal immune responses are elicited following viral infection is important for developing better vaccines. Here, we focused on the role of nasal commensal bacteria in the induction of immune responses following influenza virus infection. To deplete nasal bacteria, we intranasally administered antibiotics to mice before influenza virus infection and found that antibiotic-induced disruption of nasal bacteria could release bacterial components which stimulate the virus-specific antibody responses. Since commensal bacteria in nasal mucosa were significantly lower than those in the oral cavity, intranasal administration of split virus vaccine alone was insufficient to induce the vaccine-specific antibody response. However, intranasal supplementation of cultured oral bacteria from a healthy human volunteer enhanced antibody responses to the intranasally administered vaccine. Therefore, both integrity and amounts of nasal bacteria may be critical for an effective intranasal vaccine.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/microbiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dogs , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Vero Cells
15.
Vaccine ; 39(33): 4628-4640, 2021 07 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292968

ABSTRACT

Current influenza vaccines rely on inducing antibody responses to the rapidly evolving hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins, and thus need to be strain-matched. However, predictions of strains that will circulate are imperfect, and manufacturing of new vaccines based on them takes months. As an alternative, universal influenza vaccines target highly conserved antigens. In proof of concept studies of universal vaccine candidates in animal models challenge is generally conducted only a short time after vaccination, but protective immunity lasting far longer is important for the intended public health impact. We address the challenge of providing long-term protection. We demonstrate here broad, powerful, and long-lasting immune protection for a promising universal vaccine candidate. A single intranasal dose of recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) expressing influenza A nucleoprotein (A/NP) and matrix 2 (M2) was used. Extending our previous studies of this type of vaccine, we show that antibody and T-cell responses persist for over a year without boosting, and that protection against challenge persists a year after vaccination and remains broad, covering both group 1 and 2 influenza A viruses. In addition, we extend the work to influenza B. Immunization with influenza B nucleoprotein (B/NP)-rAd also gives immune responses that last a year without boosting and protect against challenge with influenza B viruses of mismatched HA lineages. Despite host immunity to adenoviral antigens, effective readministration is possible a year after primary vaccination, as shown by successful immunization to a transgene product the animals had not seen before. Protection against challenge with divergent and highly pathogenic A/H7N9 virus was weaker but was enhanced by a second dose of vaccine. Thus, this mucosal vaccination to conserved influenza antigens confers very long-lasting immune protection in animals against a broad range of influenza A and B viruses.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype , Influenza Vaccines , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/genetics , Immunity , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Vaccination
16.
Life Sci ; 280: 119744, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281492

ABSTRACT

Viral respiratory tract infections have significantly impacted global health as well as socio-economic growth. Respiratory viruses such as the influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and the recent SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) typically infect the upper respiratory tract by entry through the respiratory mucosa before reaching the lower respiratory tract, resulting in respiratory disease. Generally, vaccination is the primary method in preventing virus pathogenicity and it has been shown to remarkably reduce the burden of various infectious diseases. Nevertheless, the efficacy of conventional vaccines may be hindered by certain limitations, prompting the need to develop novel vaccine delivery vehicles to immunize against various strains of respiratory viruses and to mitigate the risk of a pandemic. In this review, we provide an insight into how polymer-based nanoparticles can be integrated with the development of vaccines to effectively enhance immune responses for combating viral respiratory tract infections.


Subject(s)
Nanoparticles/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Vaccination/methods , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use
17.
Viruses ; 13(4)2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231504

ABSTRACT

Influenza virus, a highly mutable respiratory pathogen, causes significant disease nearly every year. Current vaccines are designed to protect against circulating influenza strains of a given season. However, mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains, as well as inferior vaccine effectiveness in immunodeficient populations, represent major obstacles. In an effort to expand the breadth of protection elicited by influenza vaccination, one of the major surface glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA), has been modified to develop immunogens that display conserved regions from multiple viruses or elicit a highly polyclonal antibody response to broaden protection. These approaches, which target either the head or the stalk domain of HA, or both domains, have shown promise in recent preclinical and clinical studies. Furthermore, the role of adjuvants in bolstering the robustness of the humoral response has been studied, and their effects on the vaccine-elicited antibody repertoire are currently being investigated. This review will discuss the progress made in the universal influenza vaccine field with respect to influenza A viruses from the perspectives of both antigen and adjuvant, with a focus on the elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Mice , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Vaccines, Virus-Like Particle/immunology
18.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0053021, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218208

ABSTRACT

Elicitation of lung tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells (TRMs) is a goal of T cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, such as influenza A virus (IAV). C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-dependent monocyte trafficking plays an essential role in the establishment of CD8 TRMs in lungs of IAV-infected mice. Here, we used a combination adjuvant-based subunit vaccine strategy that evokes multifaceted (TC1/TC17/TH1/TH17) IAV nucleoprotein-specific lung TRMs to determine whether CCR2 and monocyte infiltration are essential for vaccine-induced TRM development and protective immunity to IAV in lungs. Following intranasal vaccination, neutrophils, monocytes, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived dendritic cells internalized and processed vaccine antigen in lungs. We found that basic leucine zipper ATF-like transcription factor 3 (BATF3)-dependent DCs were essential for eliciting T cell responses, but CCR2 deficiency enhanced the differentiation of CD127hi, KLRG-1lo, OX40+ve CD62L+ve, and mucosally imprinted CD69+ve CD103+ve effector and memory CD8 T cells in lungs and airways of vaccinated mice. Mechanistically, increased development of lung TRMs induced by CCR2 deficiency was linked to dampened expression of T-bet but not altered TCF-1 levels or T cell receptor signaling in CD8 T cells. T1/T17 functional programming, parenchymal localization of CD8/CD4 effector and memory T cells, recall T cell responses, and protective immunity to a lethal IAV infection were unaffected in CCR2-deficient mice. Taken together, we identified a negative regulatory role for CCR2 and monocyte trafficking in mucosal imprinting and differentiation of vaccine-induced TRMs. Mechanistic insights from this study may aid the development of T-cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, including IAV and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). IMPORTANCE While antibody-based immunity to influenza A virus (IAV) is type and subtype specific, lung- and airway-resident memory T cells that recognize conserved epitopes in the internal viral proteins are known to provide heterosubtypic immunity. Hence, broadly protective IAV vaccines need to elicit robust T cell memory in the respiratory tract. We have developed a combination adjuvant-based IAV nucleoprotein vaccine that elicits strong CD4 and CD8 T cell memory in lungs and protects against H1N1 and H5N1 strains of IAV. In this study, we examined the mechanisms that control vaccine-induced protective memory T cells in the respiratory tract. We found that trafficking of monocytes into lungs might limit the development of antiviral lung-resident memory T cells following intranasal vaccination. These findings suggest that strategies that limit monocyte infiltration can potentiate vaccine-induced frontline T-cell immunity to respiratory viruses, such as IAV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal , Immunologic Memory , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Receptors, CCR2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Animals , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Lung/immunology , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Receptors, CCR2/genetics
19.
J Virol ; 95(9)2021 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102152

ABSTRACT

Current influenza vaccines, live attenuated or inactivated, do not protect against antigenically novel influenza A viruses (IAVs) of pandemic potential, which has driven interest in the development of universal influenza vaccines. Universal influenza vaccine candidates targeting highly conserved antigens of IAV nucleoprotein (NP) are promising as vaccines that induce T cell immunity, but concerns have been raised about the safety of inducing robust CD8 T cell responses in the lungs. Using a mouse model, we systematically evaluated effects of recombinant adenovirus vectors (rAd) expressing IAV NP (A/NP-rAd) or influenza B virus (IBV) NP (B/NP-rAd) on pulmonary inflammation and function after vaccination and following live IAV challenge. After A/NP-rAd or B/NP-rAd vaccination, female mice exhibited robust systemic and pulmonary vaccine-specific B cell and T cell responses and experienced no morbidity (e.g., body mass loss). Both in vivo pulmonary function testing and lung histopathology scoring revealed minimal adverse effects of intranasal rAd vaccination compared with unvaccinated mice. After IAV challenge, A/NP-rAd-vaccinated mice experienced significantly less morbidity, had lower pulmonary virus titers, and developed less pulmonary inflammation than unvaccinated or B/NP-rAd-vaccinated mice. Based on analysis of pulmonary physiology using detailed testing not previously applied to the question of T cell damage, mice protected by vaccination also had better lung function than controls. Results provide evidence that, in this model, adenoviral universal influenza vaccine does not damage pulmonary tissue. In addition, adaptive immunity, in particular, T cell immunity in the lungs, does not cause damage when restimulated but instead mitigates pulmonary damage following IAV infection.IMPORTANCE Respiratory viruses can emerge and spread rapidly before vaccines are available. It would be a tremendous advance to use vaccines that protect against whole categories of viruses, such as universal influenza vaccines, without the need to predict which virus will emerge. The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza virus provides a target conserved among strains and is a dominant T cell target. In animals, vaccination to NP generates powerful T cell immunity and long-lasting protection against diverse influenza strains. Concerns have been raised, but not evaluated experimentally, that potent local T cell responses might damage the lungs. We analyzed lung function in detail in the setting of such a vaccination. Despite CD8 T cell responses in the lungs, lungs were not damaged and functioned normally after vaccination alone and were protected upon subsequent infection. This precedent provides important support for vaccines based on T cell-mediated protection, currently being considered for both influenza and SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Genetic Vectors , Influenza B virus , Influenza Vaccines , Lung , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Adenoviridae/genetics , Adenoviridae/immunology , Animals , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Influenza B virus/genetics , Influenza B virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology
20.
J Virol ; 95(4)2021 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075935

ABSTRACT

Swine influenza A virus (swIAV) infection causes substantial economic loss and disease burden in humans and animals. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza A virus is now endemic in both populations. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of different vaccines in reducing nasal shedding in pigs following pH1N1 virus challenge. We also assessed transmission from immunized and challenged pigs to naive, directly in-contact pigs. Pigs were immunized with either adjuvanted, whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines or virus-vectored (ChAdOx1 and MVA) vaccines expressing either the homologous or heterologous influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, as well as an influenza virus pseudotype (S-FLU) vaccine expressing heterologous HA. Only two vaccines containing homologous HA, which also induced high hemagglutination inhibitory antibody titers, significantly reduced virus shedding in challenged animals. Nevertheless, virus transmission from challenged to naive, in-contact animals occurred in all groups, although it was delayed in groups of vaccinated animals with reduced virus shedding.IMPORTANCE This study was designed to determine whether vaccination of pigs with conventional WIV or virus-vectored vaccines reduces pH1N1 swine influenza A virus shedding following challenge and can prevent transmission to naive in-contact animals. Even when viral shedding was significantly reduced following challenge, infection was transmissible to susceptible cohoused recipients. This knowledge is important to inform disease surveillance and control strategies and to determine the vaccine coverage required in a population, thereby defining disease moderation or herd protection. WIV or virus-vectored vaccines homologous to the challenge strain significantly reduced virus shedding from directly infected pigs, but vaccination did not completely prevent transmission to cohoused naive pigs.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/transmission , Swine Diseases/transmission , Virus Shedding , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Animals , Female , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Swine , Swine Diseases/prevention & control , Vaccination , Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL