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3.
N Z Med J ; 135(1564): 50-58, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083452

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on orthopaedic practice in New Zealand, with a focus on training and mental health. METHODS: An online survey was sent to the 385 consultant orthopaedic surgeons and registrars in New Zealand registered with the New Zealand Orthopaedic Association (NZOA). The survey consisted of 27 questions relating to demographics, the effects of COVID-19 on orthopaedic departments, on training, on mental health and the utilisation of telehealth and online teaching. RESULTS: In total, 189 of 385 NZOA members (49%) completed the survey. Of the 51 orthopaedic registrars surveyed, 55% felt that their training had been moderately affected, while 17% felt it had been significantly affected. Of those surveyed, 65% felt the pandemic had at least a mild effect on their mental health. Seven percent of registrars described a significant impact on their mental health compared to 2% of consultants (p=0.029). Overall, 46.5% felt they were more burnt out because of the pandemic, which was significantly higher in registrars compared to consultants (51% vs 44%, respectively; p=0.029). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the comparatively low number of COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations and deaths, the effects for orthopaedic surgeons and training registrars have been significant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedic Surgeons , Orthopedics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , New Zealand/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Anesthesiol Clin ; 40(3): xv-xvi, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041508
5.
Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) ; 80(3): 297-300, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2011785

ABSTRACT

As the world continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, health care providers are committed to providing care not only to our patients but also to our community. Schools in New York City (NYC) went remote on March 15, 2020. This can prove detrimental to student development and education. Numerous leaders in education and public health have noted that the remote learning will further widen educational and income disparities in those from underserved and underrepresented areas. A group of orthopedic residents who attended NYC public schools and were current house staff at a major academic tertiary medical center in NYC developed and implemented a virtual high-school mentorship program. This program incorporated weekly lectures and discussions given by health care providers to students interested in health care from NYC public high schools. The goal of this program was to provide mentorship during the COVID pandemic to a high-school audience where greater than 80% of students are considered to be living below the poverty level. Although school is now back in session, these programs should be continued in person. It is the aim of the authors that other orthopedic residents and health care providers implement similar programs in their communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , Schools
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 655, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a tremendous impact on medical education. Due to concerns of the virus spreading through gatherings of health professionals, in-person conferences and rounds were largely cancelled. The purpose of this study is the evaluate the implementation of an online educational curriculum by a major Canadian orthopaedic surgery residency program in response to COVID-19. METHODS: A survey was distributed to residents of a major Canadian orthopaedic surgery residency program from July 10th to October 24th, 2020. The survey aimed to assess residents' response to this change and to examine the effect that the transition has had on their participation, engagement, and overall educational experience. RESULTS: Altogether, 25 of 28 (89%) residents responded. Respondents generally felt the quality of education was superior (72%), their level of engagement improved (64%), and they were able to acquire more knowledge (68%) with the virtual format. Furthermore, 88% felt there was a greater diversity of topics, and 96% felt there was an increased variety of presenters. Overall, 76% of respondents felt that virtual seminars better met their personal learning objectives. Advantages reported were increased accessibility, greater convenience, and a wider breadth of teaching faculty. Disadvantages included that the virtual sessions felt less personal and lacked dynamic feedback to the presenter. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this survey reveal generally positive attitudes of orthopaedic surgery residents about the transition to virtual learning in the setting of an ongoing pandemic. This early evaluation and feedback provides valuable guidance on how to grow this novel curriculum and bring the frontier of virtual teaching to orthopaedic education long-term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Orthopedics/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2006004

ABSTRACT

An emerging issue for orthopedic surgeons is how to manage patients with active or previous COVID-19 disease, avoiding any major risks for the surgeons and the O.R. personnel. This monocentric prospective observational study aims to assess the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 viral RT-PCR RNA in cancellous bone samples in patients with active or previous COVID-19 disease. We collected data about 30 consecutive patients from our institution from January 2021 to March 2021 with active or previous COVID-19 disease. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the samples was determined using two different PCR-based assays. Eighteen of the thirty patients included in the study had a positive nasopharyngeal swab at the time of surgery. Twelve patients had a negative nasopharyngeal swab with a mean days since negativization of 138 ± 104 days, ranging from 23 to 331 days. Mean days of positivity to the nasal swab were 17 ± 17. Twenty-nine out of thirty (96.7%) samples were negative for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA. In one sample, low SARS-CoV-2 load (Cycle threshold (Ct) 36.6.) was detected but not confirmed using an additional confirmatory assay. The conducted study demonstrates the absence of the viral genome within the analyzed cancellous bone. We think that the use of personal protection equipment (PPE) to only protect from aerosol produced during surgery, both in active and recovered patients, is not strictly necessary. We think that the use of PPE should not be employed by surgeons and the O.R. personnel to protect themselves from aerosols produced from the respiratory tract. Moreover, we think that our results could represent a valid basis for further studies related to the possibility of bone donation in patients that suffered and recovered from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cancellous Bone , Humans , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e36996, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can help mitigate important health care challenges, such as demographic changes and the current COVID-19 pandemic, in high-income countries such as Germany. It gives physicians and patients the opportunity to interact via video consultations, regardless of their location, thus offering cost and time savings for both sides. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate whether telemedicine can be implemented efficiently in the follow-up care for patients in orthopedic and trauma surgery, with respect to patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, and quality of care. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a German university hospital and enrolled 60 patients with different knee and shoulder conditions. For follow-up appointments, patients received either an in-person consultation in the clinic (control group) or a video consultation with their physician (telemedicine group). Patients' and physicians' subsequent evaluations of these follow-up appointments were collected and assessed using separate questionnaires. RESULTS: On the basis of data from 52 consultations after 8 withdrawals, it was found that patients were slightly more satisfied with video consultations (mean 1.58, SD 0.643) than with in-clinic consultations (mean 1.64, SD 0.569), although the difference was not statistically significant (P=.69). After excluding video consultations marred by technical problems, no significant difference was found in physician satisfaction between the groups (mean 1.47, SD 0.516 vs mean 1.32, SD 0.557; P=.31). Further analysis indicated that telemedicine can be applied to broader groups of patients and that patients who have prior experience with telemedicine are more willing to use telemedicine for follow-up care. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine can be an alternative and efficient form of follow-up care for patients in orthopedic and trauma surgery in Germany, and it has no significant disadvantages compared with in-person consultations in the clinic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00023445; https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00023445.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Aftercare/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Germany , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/classification , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing/standards
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 566, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the 2020-21 residency interview season, interviews were conducted through virtual platforms due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study is to assess the general perceptions of applicants, residents and attendings at a single, large, metropolitan orthopaedic residency with regards to the video interview process before and after the interview season. METHODS: Surveys were sent to all orthopaedic applicants, residents, and attendings before the interview season. Applicants who received interviews and responded to the first survey (46) and faculty who responded to the first survey (28) were sent a second survey after interviews to assess how their perceptions of video interviews changed. RESULTS: Initially, 50% of applicants (360/722) and 50% of faculty and residents (28/56) responded before interview season. After interviews, 55% of interviewees (25/46) and 64% of faculty and residents (18/28) responded. Before interviews, 91% of applicants stated they would prefer in-person interviews and 71% were worried that video interviews would prevent them from finding the best program fit. Before interviews, 100% of faculty and residents stated they would rather conduct in-person interviews and 86% felt that residencies would be less likely to find applicants who best fit the program. Comparing responses before and after interviews, 16% fewer applicants (p = 0.01) perceived that in-person interviews provide a better sense of a residency program and faculty and residents' perceived ability to build rapport with interviewees improved in 11% of respondents (p = 0.01). However, in-person interviews were still heavily favored by interviewees (84%) and faculty and residents (88%) after the interview season. CONCLUSIONS: In-person interviews for Orthopaedic Surgery Residency are perceived as superior and are preferred among the overwhelming majority of applicants, residents, and interviewers. Nevertheless, perceptions toward video interviews improved in certain domains after interview season, identifying potential areas of improvement and alternative interview options for future applicants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Can J Surg ; 65(3): E382-E387, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Day-of surgery cancellation (DOSC) is considered to be a very inefficient use of hospital resources and results in emotional stress for the patient. To examine opportunities to minimize the incidence of preventable cancellations - an indicator of quality of care - we assessed the incidence of and reasons for DOSCs over 3 months among inpatients and outpatients at a trauma orthopedic service. METHODS: This was a prospective study of 2 cohorts of patients, inpatients and outpatients, scheduled for emergent orthopedic surgery at a Canadian tertiary level 1 trauma centre from Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 2020. Patient demographic characteristics, injury characteristics, delays until surgery and reasons for DOSCs were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 185 patients (100 males and 85 females with a mean age of 54 yr) were included in the study. There were 98 outpatients and 87 inpatients. Seventy-five (40%) of the scheduled procedures in the outpatient group and 34 (30%) of those in the inpatient group were cancelled. In both groups, more than 85% of the cancellations were because of prioritization of a more urgent orthopedic or nonorthopedic surgical case. The average operative delay for the outpatient group was 11.4 days, compared to 3.8 days for the inpatient group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: High DOSC rates were observed among both outpatients and inpatients. The main reason for delaying surgery was prioritization of a more urgent surgical case. Providing the orthopedic trauma service with a dedicated OR opened 6 days per week, along with extended hours of OR services to 1700 daily, might be effective at minimizing DOSCs.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , Orthopedic Procedures , Canada , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Prospective Studies , Trauma Centers
11.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 30(13): e929-e938, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835501

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The 2020 to 2021 application cycle was marked by structural changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Adaptations included the American Orthopaedic Association Council of Residency Program Directors recommendations for a universal interview offer day (UIOD), synchronizing applicant interview offer release. As a novel process within orthopaedics, there are limited data on the execution and effect of a UIOD. Study goals include determining (1) residency program adherence to the Council of Residency Program Directors UIOD guidelines during the 2020 to 2021 cycle, (2) how quickly programs filled available interviews, and (3) any difference in time from release to booking between applicants using edu and com e-mail domains. METHODS: Orthopaedic residency programs and applicants using the Thalamus interview management software platform during the 2020 to 2021 residency application cycle were analyzed, representing 46 residency programs and 993 interviewees (22% and 77% of the national total, respectively). RESULTS: Of the programs included in this study, 19 (41%) were strictly adherent to the UIOD and time, 14 (30%) were weakly adherent and sent out offers outside of the assigned time, and 13 (28%) were nonadherent and sent out offers on dates other than the UIOD. The average time to fill to 80% capacity was 26 ± 14 minutes (range 3 to 77 minutes) for the 33 programs that released on the UIOD. Applicants with edu e-mail domains scheduled their first interview an average of 1.8 minutes after those with com e-mail domains (14.8 versus 13.0 minutes, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Despite more than 60% of the residency programs committing to participate, less than half of the programs that initially agreed to participate were strictly adherent to guidelines during the first UIOD in orthopaedic surgery. Although additional research is needed to analyze the unique, fully virtual 2020 to 2021 recruitment season, a phased or waved approach to the UIOD may improve the process for all stakeholders in future cycles. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level V.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedic Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
12.
Foot Ankle Int ; 43(5): 694-702, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833056

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine offers convenient and affordable health care, overcoming the logistical challenges of face-to-face encounters. Clinicians increasingly relied on telemedicine during the global pandemic. To assess the ongoing role for telemedicine in orthopaedics, we prospectively analyzed the failure rate, safety and patient-reported experience of telephone consultations for 12 months. METHODS: 265 telephone Foot/Ankle consultations were conducted in April 2020 and were prospectively analyzed over 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the rate of failed telephone consultations. A consultation was deemed unacceptable if the patient did not answer, if the clinician could not reach a conclusion or if any outcome changed over 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included patient-reported satisfaction and time saved by avoiding a face-to-face visit. RESULTS: A clinical decision was reached in 84% of follow-up telephone consultations and 64% of new patient consultations (P = 0.001). Sixty-six percent were managed with nonoperative therapies, 16% were discharged, and 11% were added to the waiting list for surgery. The reasons for failing to achieve a clinical decision included failure to contact the patient (12.8%), inappropriate discharge with subsequent rereferral (1.9%), and insufficient clinical information (1.5%). Overall, 84.7% of patients reported that the telephone consultation was highly useful and 71.9% would recommend it to a friend or family member. Patients reported a mean time saving of 120 minutes. CONCLUSION: Based on our experience, we provide recommended criteria for the safe and practical use of telephone consultations and suggest versatile patient care pathways into which a telephone consultation can be incorporated. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, prospective cohort series (noncomparative).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics , Ankle/surgery , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , Telephone
13.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(6): 1712-1719, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826408

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on joint arthroplasty service in Europe by conducting an online survey of arthroplasty surgeons. METHODS: The survey was conducted in the European Hip Society (EHS) and the European Knee Associates (EKA). The survey consisted of 20 questions (single, multiple choice, ranked). Four topics were addressed: (1) origin and surgical experience of the participant (four questions); (2) potential disruption of arthroplasty surgeries (12 questions); (3) influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the particular arthroplasty surgeon (four questions); (4) a matrix provided 14 different arthroplasty surgeries and the participant was asked to state whether dedicated surgery was stopped, delayed or cancelled. RESULTS: Two-hundred and seventy-two surgeons (217 EHS, 55 EKA) from 40 different countries participated. Of the respondents, 25.7% stated that all surgeries were cancelled in their departments, while 68.4% responded that elective inpatient procedures were no longer being performed. With regard to the specific surgical procedures, nearly all primary TJA were cancelled (92.6%) as well as aseptic revisions (94.7%). In most hospitals, periprosthetic fractures (87.2%), hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures and septic revisions for acute infections (75.8%) were still being performed. CONCLUSION: During the current 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, we are experiencing a near-total shutdown of TJA. A massive cutback was observed for primary TJA and revision TJA, even in massively failed TJA with collapse, dislocation, component failure or imminent dislocation. Only life-threatening pathologies like periprosthetic fractures and acute septic TJA are currently undergoing surgical treatment. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Europe/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Internet , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(6): 1705-1711, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826407

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to the lack of evidence, it was the aim of the study to investigate current possible cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: An online survey was performed of orthopaedic surgeons in the German-speaking Arthroscopy Society (Gesellschaft für Arthroskopie und Gelenkchirurgie, AGA). The survey consisted of 20 questions concerning four topics: four questions addressed the origin and surgical experience of the participant, 12 questions dealt with potential cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare and 4 questions addressed the influence of the pandemic on the particular surgeon. RESULTS: Of 4234 contacted orthopaedic surgeons, 1399 responded. Regarding arthroscopic procedures between 10 and 30% of the participants stated that these were still being performed-with actual percentages depending on the specific joint and procedure. Only 6.2% of the participants stated that elective total joint arthroplasty was still being performed at their centre. In addition, physical rehabilitation and surgeons' postoperative follow-ups were severely affected. CONCLUSION: Orthopaedic healthcare services in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland are suffering a drastic cutback due to COVID-19. A drastic reduction in arthroscopic procedures like rotator cuff repair and cruciate ligament reconstruction and an almost total shutdown of elective total joint arthroplasty were reported. Long-term consequences cannot be predicted yet. The described disruption in orthopaedic healthcare services has to be viewed as historic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty/statistics & numerical data , Arthroscopy/statistics & numerical data , Austria/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Germany/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
15.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 30(14): 648-657, 2022 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811110

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic created unprecedented challenges to residency recruitment. With in-person away rotations prohibited and interviews held virtually, orthopaedic residency programs turned to social media. Studies document the exponential growth of residency program Instagram accounts after March 2020, but few analyze the content of their posts. This study provides an updated assessment of such Instagram accounts including a detailed analysis of their content and a discussion of potentially concerning posts. METHODS: Orthopaedic surgery residency programs participating in the National Resident Matching Program and any Instagram accounts associated with these programs were identified. Instagram accounts were analyzed, and the 25 most recent posts and all highlighted stories for each account were coded for content based on a predetermined list of categories. Specific attention was given to content that may raise legal, ethical, or professionalism concerns. The primary outcome was the most common content code among posts. The secondary outcomes were the number of posts identified as potentially concerning and the types of concerns represented. RESULTS: Overall, 138 of 193 residency programs (72%) had an Instagram account at the time of cross-sectional analysis, 65% of which were created between April and December 2020. All accounts were public. Profiles had on average 1,156 ± 750 followers and 59 ± 75 posts. Of the 3,348 posts analyzed, the most common coded themes were resident introductions (33%), camaraderie (27%), and social life and hobbies (26%). There were 81 concerning posts from 52 separate accounts. Seventy-five of the concerning posts (93%) depicted residents scrubbed alone. CONCLUSION: Orthopaedic residency Instagram accounts are potential tools for residency recruitment and can depict a program's culture through posts over time. However, public accounts are open to scrutiny by other viewers, including patients and their families. Care must be taken to consider multiple perspectives of post content, so as to bolster, not damage, the residency program's reputation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedic Procedures , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
16.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 47(6): 562-567, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785101

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has affected us all. The following collection of short essays highlights various aspects of the pandemic and how it has impacted hand surgery and lessons learned, from the perspective of the Federation of European Societies for Surgery of the Hand (FESSH) Executive Committee members. A range of topics were individually chosen by each of the five committee members and presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Injuries , Orthopedic Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hand/surgery , Hand Injuries/surgery , Humans , Pandemics
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e047500, 2022 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752848

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is controversy regarding the importance of air-transmitted infections for surgical site infections (SSIs) after orthopaedic surgery. Research has been hindered by both the inability in blinding the exposure, and by the need for recruiting large enough cohorts. The aim of this study is to investigate whether using a new form of air purifier using plasma air purification (PAP) in operating rooms (ORs) lowers the SSI rate or not. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Multicentre, double-blind, cluster-randomised, placebo-controlled trial conducted at seven hospitals in 2017-2022. All patients that undergo orthopaedic surgery for minimum 30 min are included. Intervention group: patients operated in OR with PAP devices turned on. CONTROL GROUP: patients operated in OR with PAP devices turned off. Randomisation: each OR will be randomised in periods of 4 weeks, 6 weeks or 8 weeks to either have the devices on or off. PRIMARY OUTCOME: any SSI postoperatively defined as a composite endpoint of any of the following: use of isoxazolylpenicillin, clindamycin or rifampicin for 2 days or more, International Classification of Diseases codes or Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee codes indicating postoperative infection. In a second step, we will perform a chart review on those patients with positive indicators of SSI to further validate the outcome. Secondary outcomes are described in the Methods section. Power: we assume an SSI rate of 2%, an SSI reduction rate of 25% and we need approximately 45 000 patients to attain a power of 80% at a significance level of 0.05. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority. The interim analysis results from the study will be presented only to the researchers involved unless the study thereafter is interrupted for whatever reason. Publication in a medical journal will be presented after inclusion of the last patient. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02695368.


Subject(s)
Orthopedic Procedures , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Incidence , Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control
18.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6): 671-676, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724736

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The current pandemic caused by COVID-19 is the biggest challenge for national health systems for a century. While most medical resources are allocated to treat COVID-19 patients, several non-COVID-19 medical emergencies still need to be treated, including vertebral fractures and spinal cord compression. The aim of this paper is to report the early experience and an organizational protocol for emergency spinal surgery currently being used in a large metropolitan area by an integrated team of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons. METHODS: An organizational model is presented based on case centralization in hub hospitals and early management of surgical cases to reduce hospital stay. Data from all the patients admitted for emergency spinal surgery from the beginning of the outbreak were prospectively collected and compared to data from patients admitted for the same reason in the same time span in the previous year, and treated by the same integrated team. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients (11 males and eight females, with a mean age of 49.9 years (14 to 83)) were admitted either for vertebral fracture or spinal cord compression in a 19-day period, compared to the ten admitted in the previous year. No COVID-19 patients were treated. The mean time between admission and surgery was 1.7 days, significantly lower than 6.8 days the previous year (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The structural organization and the management protocol we describe allowed us to reduce the time to surgery and ultimately hospital stay, thereby maximizing the already stretched medical resources available. We hope that our early experience can be of value to the medical communities that will soon be in the same emergency situation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6):671-676.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Models, Organizational , Neurosurgical Procedures , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , Spinal Cord Compression/surgery , Spinal Fractures/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Efficiency, Organizational , Emergencies , Female , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Prospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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