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1.
Surgeon ; 19(2): e42-e48, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294258

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 pandemic has created havoc all over the globe and spared no one regardless of status, gender, location and ethnicity. There were questions raised if trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) procedures actually generated aerosols? The need for a review of literature highlighting the nature and impact of aerosol generation within T&O surgery was noted. METHODS: A comprehensive online search was performed for all published articles in the English language, evaluating AGPs in T&O surgery and the relevant personal protection equipment used. RESULTS: The search strategy populated 43 studies. Six studies were identified as duplicates. The shortlisted 37 studies were screened and nine studies were included in the review. An additional four studies were included from the bibliography review. CONCLUSION: Most orthopaedic procedures are high-risk aerosol generating procedures (AGPs). Conventional surgical masks do not offer protection against high-risk AGPs. In the current era of COVID-19 pandemic, there is a significant risk to the transmission of infection to the theatre staff. For protection against airborne transmission, appropriate masks should be used. These need proper fitting and sizing to ensure full protection when used.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Traumatology/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
2.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 333-339, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the operational trends in the orthopedic surgery department of a tertiary referral center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 305 orthopedic surgical procedures in 245 patients (136 males, 109 females; mean age: 34±26.6 years; range, 0 to 91 years) between March 16th and June 27th, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. The same period of the year before including 860 procedures in 783 patients (364 males, 419 females; mean age: 33.6±25.8 years; range, 0 to 95 years) was also reviewed as a pre-pandemic control group. Patient demographics, surgical indications, COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test status, method of anesthesia, surgical subspecialties (trauma, sports, etc.), trauma mechanisms, and surgical priorities were evaluated. The pandemic and the pre-pandemic periods were compared. RESULTS: The rate of elective surgeries decreased compared to the previous year, and priority C type surgeries had the highest frequency (42.5%). Orthopedic trauma was the leading subspecialty with 91 (29.8%) cases and had a higher share, compared to the pre-pandemic period (17.0%). Hip fractures (18.7%) were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls (42.3%) composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms, which was similar to the pre-pandemic period (hip fractures, 13.6%; simple falls, 42.5%). The distribution of surgical urgency levels and subspecialties differed significantly between the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods (p<0.001). Post-hoc analysis of subspecialty distribution revealed a significant decrease in arthroplasty (p=0.002) and hand surgery (p<0.001), and a significant increase in trauma (p<0.001) and the "other" category (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Our experience in a tertiary referral center illustrated a shift toward performing emergent and urgent surgeries, when the severity of the outbreak increased. Prioritizing surgical urgencies during the outbreak changed the orthopedic surgery practice with an emphasis on trauma and oncology surgeries. Hip fractures were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hip Fractures , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Orthopedic Procedures , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Male , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/surgery , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
3.
J Orthop Traumatol ; 22(1): 22, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269870

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic fractures (PPFs) are a growing matter for orthopaedic surgeons, and patients with PPFs may represent a frail target in the case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether hospital reorganisations during the most severe phase of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affected standards of care and early outcomes of patients treated for PPFs in Northern Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were retrieved from a multicentre retrospective orthopaedics and traumatology database, including 14 hospitals. The following parameters were studied: demographics, results of nasopharyngeal swabs, prevalence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), comorbidities, general health status (EQ-5D-5L Score), frailty (Clinical Frailty Scale, CFS), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), anaesthesiologic risk (American Society of Anaesthesiology Score, ASA Score), classification (unified classification system, UCS), type of operation and anaesthesia, in-hospital and early complications (Clavien-Dindo Classification, CDC), and length of stay (LOS). Data were analysed by means of descriptive statistics. Out of 1390 patients treated for any reason, 38 PPFs were included. RESULTS: Median age was 81 years (range 70-96 years). Twenty-three patients (60.5%) were swabbed on admission, and two of them (5.3%) tested positive; in three patients (7.9%), the diagnosis of COVID-19 was established on a clinical and radiological basis. Two more patients tested positive post-operatively, and one of them died due to COVID-19. Thirty-three patients (86.8%) presented a proximal femoral PPF. Median ASA Score was 3 (range, 1-4), median VAS score on admission was 3 (range, 0-6), median CFS was 4 (range, 1-8), median EQ-5D-5L Score was 3 in each one of the categories (range, 1-5). Twenty-three patients (60.5%) developed post-operative complications, and median CDC grade was 3 (range, 1-5). The median LOS was 12.8 days (range 2-36 days), and 21 patients (55.3%) were discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of PPFs did not seem to change during the lockdown. Patients were mainly elderly with comorbidities, and complications were frequently recorded post-operatively. Despite the difficult period for the healthcare system, hospitals were able to provide effective conventional surgical treatments for PPFs, which were not negatively influenced by the reorganisation. Continued efforts are required to optimise the treatment of these frail patients in the period of the pandemic, minimising the risk of contamination, and to limit the incidence of PPFs in the future. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Restructuring , Infection Control , Pandemics , Periprosthetic Fractures , Standard of Care , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Comorbidity , Female , Frailty/epidemiology , Hospital Restructuring/organization & administration , Hospital Restructuring/standards , Hospital Restructuring/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Periprosthetic Fractures/complications , Periprosthetic Fractures/epidemiology , Periprosthetic Fractures/surgery , Periprosthetic Fractures/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care/standards , Standard of Care/statistics & numerical data
4.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 356, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has had a massive impact on individuals globally. The Chinese government has formulated effective response measures, and medical personnel have been actively responding to challenges associated with the epidemic prevention and control strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the implementation of a care transition pathway on patients that underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was designed to evaluate the effect of implementing a care transition pathway for patients who underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 pandemic in the orthopedic department of a tertiary care hospital in Beijing, China. Using a convenient sampling method, a total of 96 patients were selected. Of these, 51 patients who had undergone joint replacement in 2019 and received treatment via the routine nursing path were included in the control group. The remaining 45 patients who underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 epidemic in 2020 and received therapy via the care transition pathway due to the implementation of epidemic prevention and control measures were included in the observation group. The quality of care transition was assessed by the Care Transition Measure (CTM), and patients were followed up 1 week after discharge. RESULTS: The observation group was determined to have better general self-care preparation, written planning materials, doctor-patient communication, health monitoring, and quality of care transition than the control group. CONCLUSIONS: A care transition pathway was developed to provide patients with care while transitioning through periods of treatment. It improved the patient perceptions of nursing quality. The COVID-19 pandemic is a huge challenge for health professionals, but we have the ability to improve features of workflows to provide the best possible patient care.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Transitional Care/trends , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement/rehabilitation , Beijing/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/rehabilitation , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(10): 2776-2820, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252520

ABSTRACT

The use of Wide Awake Local Anaesthetic No Tourniquet (WALANT) amongst Plastic and Orthopaedic Hand Surgeons has been accelerated by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated risks of general anaesthesia. Benefits of WALANT include a bloodless field, improved recovery, on-table testing, as well as cost and time savings. Whilst more clinical trials are underway to fully elucidate safety-profile and outcomes, there is a lack of consensus and clarity over contraindications to WALANT. A survey of trainees identified that only one-in-five were aware of the appropriate reversal agent in the event of inadequate perfusion. We feel that a WALANT checklist should be developed and implemented for use immediately prior to administration of local anaesthetic with adrenaline to an extremity, building on the successes of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Royal College of Anaesthetists checklists. Such a checklist should include contraindications to WALANT and make the operator aware of the availability, dose and location of Phentolamine as a reversal agent. Introducing this checklist will help to facilitate safer and more effective use of WALANT within Hand Surgery.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Local/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Comorbidity , Humans , Tourniquets
6.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 336, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243813

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report our experiences with COVID-19 in one of the largest referral orthopedic centers in the Middle East and aimed to describe the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of these patients. METHODS: During February 20 and April 20, 2020, patients who underwent orthopedic surgery and healthcare staff who were in contact with these patients were screened for COVID-19. To identify patients who were in the incubation period of COVID-19 during their hospital stay, all patients were tested again for COVID-19 4 weeks after discharge. RESULTS: Overall, 1244 patients underwent orthopedic surgery (1123 emergency and 121 elective) during the study period. Overall, 17 patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 during hospital admission and seven after discharge. Among the total 24 patients with COVID-19, 15 were (62.5%) males with a mean (SD) age of 47.0±1.6 years old. Emergency surgeries were performed in 20 (83.3%) patients, and elective surgery was done in the remaining 4 patients which included one case of posterior spinal fusion, spondylolisthesis, acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and one case of leg necrosis. A considerable number of infections occurred in patients with intertrochanteric fractures (n=7, 29.2%), followed by pelvic fractures (n=2, 8.3%), humerus fractures (n=2, 8.3%), and tibial plateau fractures (n=2, 8.3%). Fever (n=11, 45.8%) and cough (n=10, 37.5%) were the most common symptoms among patients. Laboratory examinations showed leukopenia in 2 patients (8.3%) and lymphopenia in 4 (16.7%) patients. One patient with a history of cancer died 2 weeks after discharge due to myocardial infarction. Among hospital staff, 26 individuals contracted COVID-19 during the study period, which included 13 (50%) males. Physicians were the most commonly infected group (n = 11), followed by operation room technicians (n = 5), nurses (n = 4), and paramedics (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who undergo surgical treatment for orthopedic problems, particularly lower limb fractures with limited ambulation, are at a higher risk of acquiring COVID-19 infections, although they may not be at higher risks for death compared to the general population. Orthopedic surgeons in particular and other hospital staff who are in close contact with these patients must be adequately trained and given appropriate personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Health Personnel/trends , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods
7.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211009670, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195898

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads globally, hospital departments will need take steps to manage their treatment procedures and wards. The preparations of high-risk departments (infection, respiratory, emergency, and intensive care unit) were relatively well within this pandemic, while low-risk departments may be unprepared. The spine surgery department in The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University in Hefei, China, was used as an example in this study. The spine surgery department took measures to manage the patients, medical staff and wards to avoid the cross-infection within hospital. During the outbreak, no patients or healthcare workers were infected, and no treatment was delayed due to these measures. The prevention and control measures effectively reduced the risk of nosocomial transmission between health workers and patients while providing optimum care. It was a feasible management approach that was applicable to most low-risk and even high-risk departments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , Patient Isolators/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Disinfection/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/instrumentation , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Patient Isolation/methods , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Spine/surgery
8.
Surg Innov ; 28(2): 183-188, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156051

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant medication, supply and equipment, and provider shortages, limiting the resources available for provision of surgical care. In response to mandates restricting surgery to high-acuity procedures during this period, our institution developed a multidisciplinary Low-Resource Operating Room (LROR) Taskforce in April 2020. This study describes our institutional experience developing an LROR to maintain access to urgent surgical procedures during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods. A delineation of available resources and resource replacement strategies was conducted, and a final institution-wide plan for operationalizing the LROR was formed. Specialty-specific subgroups then convened to determine best practices and opportunities for LROR utilization. Orthopedic surgery performed in the LROR using wide-awake local anesthesia no tourniquet (WALANT) is presented as a use case. Results. Overall, 19 limited resources were identified, spanning across the domains of physical space, drugs, devices and equipment, and personnel. Based on the assessment, the decision to proceed with creation of an LROR was made. Sixteen urgent orthopedic surgeries were successfully performed using WALANT without conversion to general anesthesia. Conclusion. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a LROR was successfully designed and operationalized. The process for development of a LROR and recommended strategies for operating in a resource-constrained environment may serve as a model for other institutions and facilitate rapid implementation of this care model should the need arise in future pandemic or disaster situations.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Local , COVID-19 , Operating Rooms , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Anesthesia, Local/instrumentation , Anesthesia, Local/methods , Health Resources , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/instrumentation , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 103, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is the largest global event in recent times, with millions of infected people and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide. Colombia has also been affected by the pandemic, including by the cancellation of medically necessary surgical procedures that were categorized as nonessential. The objective of this study was to show the results of the program implemented in two institutions in Bogotá, Colombia, in April 2020 to support the performance of elective essential and nonessential low- and medium-complexity orthopedic surgeries during the mitigation phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, which involved a presurgical clinical protocol without serological or molecular testing. METHODS: This was a multicenter, observational, retrospective, descriptive study of a cohort of patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgery at two institutions in the city of Bogota, Colombia, in April 2020. We implemented a preoperative clinical protocol that did not involve serological or molecular tests; the protocol consisted of a physical examination, a survey of symptoms and contact with confirmed or suspected cases, and presurgical isolation. We recorded the types of surgeries, the patients' scores on the medically necessary, time-sensitive (MeNTs) scale, the presence of signs, symptoms, and mortality associated with COVID-19 developed after the operation. RESULTS: A total of 179 patients underwent orthopedic surgery. The average age was 47 years (Shapiro-Wilk, P = 0.021), and the range was between 18 and 81 years. There was a female predominance (61.5%). With regard to the types of surgeries, 86 (48%) were knee operations, 42 (23.5%) were hand surgeries, 34 (19%) were shoulder surgeries, and 17 (9.5%) were foot and ankle surgeries. The average MeNTs score was 44.6 points. During the 2 weeks after surgery, four patients were suspected of having COVID-19 because they developed at least two symptoms associated with the disease. The incidence of COVID-19 in the postoperative period was 2.3%. Two (1.1%) of these four patients visited an emergency department where RT-PCR tests were performed, and they tested negative for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). No patients died or were hospitalized for symptoms of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Through the implementation of a presurgical clinical protocol consisting of a physical examination; a clinical survey inquiring about signs, symptoms, and epidemiological contact with suspected or confirmed cases; and presurgical isolation but not involving the performance of molecular or serological diagnostic tests, positive results were obtained with regard to the performance of low- and medium-complexity elective orthopedic surgeries in an early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Preoperative Care/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Preoperative Care/standards , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
11.
Int Orthop ; 44(8): 1511-1518, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The "Spedali Civili", one of the largest hospitals in the Italian region most affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection, is managing a large number of traumatic injuries. The objective of this article is to share our operational protocols to deliver an appropriate hospital trauma care in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We changed our work shifts, in consideration of the high number of patients; colleagues from smaller hospitals in the area joined us to increase the number of surgeons available. Thanks to the collaboration between orthopaedists, anaesthesiologists, and nurses, we created a flow chart and separate routes (in the emergency room, in the wards, and in the operating rooms) to optimize patient management. Our protocols allow us to always provide healthcare professionals with the correct personal protective equipment for the task they are performing. RESULTS: Our strategies proved to be practical and feasible. Having a well thought plan helped us to provide for the most robust response possible. We have not yet been able to study the effectiveness of our protocols, and our recommendations may not be applicable to all healthcare facilities. Nonetheless, sharing our early experience can help other institutions conducting and adapting such plans more quickly. CONCLUSIONS: Having a clear strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic kept our systems resilient and effective and allowed us to provide high-quality trauma care. We offer this approach for other institutions to adopt and adapt to their local setting.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Italy , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Personal Protective Equipment , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Ital J Pediatr ; 46(1): 149, 2020 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842313

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy has dramatically impacted the National Healthcare System, causing the sudden congestion of hospitals, especially in Northern Italy, thus imposing drastic restriction of almost all routine medical care. This exceptional adaptation of the Italian National Healthcare System has also been felt by non-frontline settings such as Pediatric Orthopaedic Units, where the limitation or temporary suspension of most routine care activities met with a need to maintain continuity of care and avoid secondary issues due to the delay or suspension of the routine clinical practice. The Italian Society of Pediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology formulated general and specific recommendations to face the COVID-19 outbreak, aiming to provide essential care for children needing orthopaedic treatments during the pandemic and early post-peak period, ensure safety of children, caregivers and healthcare providers and limit the spread of contagion.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedics/standards , Patient Safety , Pediatrics/standards , Societies, Medical/standards , Traumatology/standards
13.
Clin Spine Surg ; 34(3): 87-91, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835180

ABSTRACT

Safe spine surgery is possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. Certain urgent procedures must still be performed during this challenging time to prevent permanent long-term disability or death for patients. Precautions must be taken in the operating room to optimize safety, including the use of personal protective equipment and appropriate room setup and anesthesia and equipment optimization. Evidence-based guidelines to create a safe operative paradigm for use in future viral outbreaks are paramount.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Air Filters , Airway Extubation , Electrocoagulation , Fluoroscopy , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring , Intubation, Intratracheal , N95 Respirators , Operating Rooms , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilation
14.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 40(10): e990-e993, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-766811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has substantially altered the typical process around performing surgery to ensure protection of health care workers, patients, and their families. One safety precaution has been the implementation of universal preoperative screening for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This study examines the results of universal screening on children undergoing orthopaedic surgery. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study evaluating the incidence and symptomatology of COVID-19 in all patients presenting for orthopaedic surgery at 3 pediatric tertiary care children's hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic (March to June 2020). All patients underwent universal screening with a nasopharyngeal swab to detect presence of SARS-CoV-2. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for positive COVID-19 screening. RESULTS: In total, 1198 patients underwent preoperative screening across all 3 institutions and 7 (0.58%) had detection of SARS-CoV-2. The majority of patients (1/7, 86%) were asymptomatic. Patients that tested positive were significantly more likely to be Hispanic (P=0.046) and had greater number of medical comorbidities (P=0.013), as scored on the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status score. A known COVID-19 positive contact was found to be a significant risk factor in the multivariate analysis (P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Early results of universal preoperative screening for COVID-19 demonstrates a low incidence and high rate of asymptomatic patients. Health care professionals, especially those at higher risk for the virus, should be aware of the challenges related to screening based solely on symptoms or travel history and consider universal screening for patients undergoing elective surgery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Diagnostic Screening Programs , Infection Control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Preoperative Care/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
15.
J Patient Saf ; 16(4): e292-e298, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-683897

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to design an objective, transparent, pragmatic, and flexible workflow to assist with patient selection during the initial phase of return to elective orthopedic surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic with the main purpose of enhancing patient safety. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working group was formed consisting of representatives for orthopedics, epidemiology, ethics, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and intensive care medicine. Preparation for upcoming meetings consisted of reading up on literature and testing of proposed methodologies on our own waiting lists. RESULTS: A workflow based on 3 domains, that is, required resources, patient fitness, and time sensitivity of the procedure, was considered most useful. All domains function as standalones, in a specific order, and no sum score is used. The domain of required resources demands input from the surgical team, results in a categorical (yes or no) outcome, and generates a list of potential patients who can be scheduled for surgery under these particular circumstances. The (weighted) items for the domain of patient fitness are the same for every patient, are scored on a numerical scale, but are likely to change during the pandemic as more data become available. Time sensitivity of the procedure is again scored on a numerical scale and becomes increasingly important when returning to elective surgery proves to be acceptably safe. After patient selection, an augmented informed consent, screening, and testing according to local guidelines will take place. CONCLUSIONS: A workflow is proposed for patient selection aiming for the safest possible return to elective orthopedic surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Surg ; 80: 162-167, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak was fraught with danger and despair as many medically necessary surgeries were cancelled to preserve precious healthcare resources and mitigate disease transmission. As the rate of infection starts to slow, healthcare facilities and economies attempt to return to normalcy in a graduated manner and the massive pent-up demand for surgeries needs to eventually be addressed in a systematic and equitable manner. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Guidelines from the Alliance of International Organizations of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Orthopaedic Trauma Association, American College of Surgeons, American Society of Anaesthesiologists, Association of perioperative Registered Nurses, American Hospital Association, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were evaluated and summarized into a working framework, relevant to orthopaedic surgeons. RESULTS: The guiding principles for restarting elective surgeries in a safe and acceptable manner include up-to-date disease awareness, projection and judicious management of equipment and facilities, effective human resource management, a fair and transparent system to prioritize cases, optimization of peri-operative workflows and continuous data gathering and clinical governance. CONCLUSION: The world was ill prepared for the initial COVID-19 outbreak. However, with effective forward planning, institutions can ramp-up elective surgical caseload in a safe and equitable manner.


Subject(s)
Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Workflow , American Hospital Association , Anesthesiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , Perioperative Nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Traumatology , United States/epidemiology , World Health Organization
18.
J Surg Oncol ; 122(5): 825-830, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown has presented a unique challenge for sarcoma care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early results and feasibility of surgeries for bone sarcomas during the COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: Our prospectively collected orthopaedic oncological database was reviewed to include two groups of patients- those who underwent surgery in the immediate 4 weeks before lockdown (non-lockdown group) and those operated in the first 4 weeks of lockdown (lockdown group). All patients were followed-up clinically and telephonically to collect the outcome data. RESULTS: Out of the 91 patients who qualified for inclusion, fifty were classified into the non-lockdown group while 41 patients formed the lockdown group. Both the groups were comparable with respect to baseline demographic parameters. However, during the lockdown period 37 patients (90%) had undergone a major surgical intervention as against 24 patients (48%) in the non-lockdown group (P < .001). There was no significant difference in type of anaesthesia, median estimated blood loss and procedure duration. None of the patients/health care workers had evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 infection at 15 days follow-up. CONCLUSION: Our study results suggest that appendicular bone tumours can be safely operated with adequate precautions during the lockdown period.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sarcoma/surgery , Adult , Bone Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Chondrosarcoma/pathology , Chondrosarcoma/surgery , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Limb Salvage/methods , Limb Salvage/standards , Male , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Osteosarcoma/pathology , Osteosarcoma/surgery , Pandemics , Sarcoma/pathology , Sarcoma, Ewing/pathology , Sarcoma, Ewing/surgery , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
19.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg ; 141(7): 1131-1137, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the novel coronavirus-induced disease (COVID-19), there is the fear of nosocomial infections and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmissions to healthcare workers (HCW). We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient who underwent explantation of a shoulder prosthesis due to a periprosthetic infection. He was tested SARS-CoV-2 positive 7 days after admission to the orthopaedic department following strict infection control measures, routinely including screening all patients for multi-drug-resistant organism (MDRO) colonization upon admission. Aim of our study is to report on the spreading potential of SARS-CoV-2 in a healthcare setting if standard contact precautions and infection control measures have been established. METHODS: All HCW with exposure to the patient from day of admission until confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 were identified and underwent oropharyngeal swab testing for SARS-CoV-2 by real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: Sixty-six HCW were identified: nine orthopaedic surgeons, four anaesthesiologists, 25 orthopaedic nurses, five nurse anesthetists, eight scrub nurses, five nursing students, two medical assistants and seven service employees. Fourteen HCW (21%) showed clinical symptoms compatible with a SARS-CoV-2 infection: cough (n = 4), sore throat (n = 3), nasal congestion (n = 3), dyspnea (n = 2), fever (n = 1), headache and myalgia (n = 1). SARS-CoV-2 was not detected in any of the 66 HCW. CONCLUSION: Hygienic measures and contact precautions, aimed at preventing the spread of MRDO, may have helped to prevent a SARS-CoV-2 transmission to HCW-despite high-risk exposure during intubation, surgical treatment and general care. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV, case series.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Contact Tracing/methods , Device Removal/methods , Health Personnel/classification , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/analysis , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Prosthesis-Related Infections/surgery , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Shoulder/surgery
20.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(7): 2027-2035, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592102

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: It was the primary purpose of the present systematic review to identify the optimal protection measures during COVID-19 pandemic and provide guidance of protective measures for orthopedic surgeons. The secondary purpose was to report the protection experience of an orthopedic trauma center in Wuhan, China during the pandemic. METHODS: A systematic search of the PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, Google Scholar was performed for studies about COVID-19, fracture, trauma, orthopedic, healthcare workers, protection, telemedicine. The appropriate protective measures for orthopedic surgeons and patients were reviewed (on-site first aid, emergency room, operating room, isolation wards, general ward, etc.) during the entire diagnosis and treatment process of traumatic patients. RESULTS: Eighteen studies were included, and most studies (13/18) emphasized that orthopedic surgeons should pay attention to prevent cross-infection. Only four studies have reported in detail how orthopedic surgeons should be protected during surgery in the operating room. No detailed studies on multidisciplinary cooperation, strict protection, protection training, indications of emergency surgery, first aid on-site and protection in orthopedic wards were found. CONCLUSION: Strict protection at every step in the patient pathway is important to reduce the risk of cross-infection. Lessons learnt from our experience provide some recommendations of protective measures during the entire diagnosis and treatment process of traumatic patients and help others to manage orthopedic patients with COVID-19, to reduce the risk of cross-infection between patients and to protect healthcare workers during work. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Air Filters , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital , First Aid , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Humans , Operating Rooms , Orthopedic Surgeons , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Transportation of Patients , Trauma Centers
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