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1.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 479(7): 1417-1425, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare disparities are well documented across multiple subspecialties in orthopaedics. The widespread implementation of telemedicine risks worsening these disparities if not carefully executed, despite original assumptions that telemedicine improves overall access to care. Telemedicine also poses unique challenges such as potential language or technological barriers that may alter previously described patterns in orthopaedic disparities. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: Are the proportions of patients who use telemedicine across orthopaedic services different among (1) racial and ethnic minorities, (2) non-English speakers, and (3) patients insured through Medicaid during a 10-week period after the implementation of telemedicine in our healthcare system compared with in-person visits during a similar time period in 2019? METHODS: This was a retrospective comparative study using electronic medical record data to compare new patients establishing orthopaedic care via outpatient telemedicine at two academic urban medical centers between March 2020 and May 2020 with new orthopaedic patients during the same 10-week period in 2019. A total of 11,056 patients were included for analysis, with 1760 in the virtual group and 9296 in the control group. Unadjusted analyses demonstrated patients in the virtual group were younger (median age 57 years versus 59 years; p < 0.001), but there were no differences with regard to gender (56% female versus 56% female; p = 0.66). We used self-reported race or ethnicity as our primary independent variable, with primary language and insurance status considered secondarily. Unadjusted and multivariable adjusted analyses were performed for our primary and secondary predictors using logistic regression. We also assessed interactions between race or ethnicity, primary language, and insurance type. RESULTS: After adjusting for age, gender, subspecialty, insurance, and median household income, we found that patients who were Hispanic (odds ratio 0.59 [95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.91]; p = 0.02) or Asian were less likely (OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.53 to 0.99]; p = 0.04) to be seen through telemedicine than were patients who were white. After controlling for confounding variables, we also found that speakers of languages other than English or Spanish were less likely to have a telemedicine visit than were people whose primary language was English (OR 0.34 [95% CI 0.18 to 0.65]; p = 0.001), and that patients insured through Medicaid were less likely to be seen via telemedicine than were patients who were privately insured (OR 0.83 [95% CI 0.69 to 0.98]; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Despite initial promises that telemedicine would help to bridge gaps in healthcare, our results demonstrate disparities in orthopaedic telemedicine use based on race or ethnicity, language, and insurance type. The telemedicine group was slightly younger, which we do not believe undermines the findings. As healthcare moves toward increased telemedicine use, we suggest several approaches to ensure that patients of certain racial, ethnic, or language groups do not experience disparate barriers to care. These might include individual patient- or provider-level approaches like expanded telemedicine schedules to accommodate weekends and evenings, institutional investment in culturally conscious outreach materials such as advertisements on community transport systems, or government-level provisions such as reimbursement for telephone-only encounters. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic study.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Health Plan Implementation , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Humans , Insurance Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Language , Male , Medicaid , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods , United States
2.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 112, 2021 07 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A total lockdown for pandemic SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) entailed a restriction of elective orthopedic surgeries in Switzerland.  While access to the hospital and human contacts were limited, hygiene measures were intensified. The objective was to investigate the impact of those strict public health guidelines on the rate of intra-hospital, deep surgical site infections (SSI), wound healing disorders and non-infectious postoperative complications after orthopedic surgery during the first Covid-19 lockdown. METHODS: In a single-center study, patients with orthopedic surgery during the first Covid-19 lockdown from March 16, 2020 to April 26, 2020 were compared to cohorts that underwent orthopedic intervention in the pre- and post-lockdown periods of six months each. Besides the implementation of substantial public health measures (promotion of respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene), no additional infection control bundles have been implemented. RESULTS: 5791 patients were included in this study. In multivariate Cox regression analyses adjusting for the large case-mix, the lockdown was unrelated to SSI (hazard ratio (HR) 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-4.8), wound healing disorders (HR 0.7; 95% CI 0.1-5.7) or other non-infectious postoperative complications (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.5) after a median follow-up of seven months. CONCLUSION: The risks for SSI, wound healing disorders and other complications in orthopedic surgery were not influenced by the extended public health measures of the total Covid-19 lockdown. Trial registration BASEC 2020-02646 (Cantonal Ethics Commission Zurich). LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.


Subject(s)
Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Surgical Wound Infection/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Switzerland , Young Adult
3.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 333-339, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the operational trends in the orthopedic surgery department of a tertiary referral center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 305 orthopedic surgical procedures in 245 patients (136 males, 109 females; mean age: 34±26.6 years; range, 0 to 91 years) between March 16th and June 27th, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. The same period of the year before including 860 procedures in 783 patients (364 males, 419 females; mean age: 33.6±25.8 years; range, 0 to 95 years) was also reviewed as a pre-pandemic control group. Patient demographics, surgical indications, COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test status, method of anesthesia, surgical subspecialties (trauma, sports, etc.), trauma mechanisms, and surgical priorities were evaluated. The pandemic and the pre-pandemic periods were compared. RESULTS: The rate of elective surgeries decreased compared to the previous year, and priority C type surgeries had the highest frequency (42.5%). Orthopedic trauma was the leading subspecialty with 91 (29.8%) cases and had a higher share, compared to the pre-pandemic period (17.0%). Hip fractures (18.7%) were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls (42.3%) composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms, which was similar to the pre-pandemic period (hip fractures, 13.6%; simple falls, 42.5%). The distribution of surgical urgency levels and subspecialties differed significantly between the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods (p<0.001). Post-hoc analysis of subspecialty distribution revealed a significant decrease in arthroplasty (p=0.002) and hand surgery (p<0.001), and a significant increase in trauma (p<0.001) and the "other" category (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Our experience in a tertiary referral center illustrated a shift toward performing emergent and urgent surgeries, when the severity of the outbreak increased. Prioritizing surgical urgencies during the outbreak changed the orthopedic surgery practice with an emphasis on trauma and oncology surgeries. Hip fractures were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hip Fractures , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Orthopedic Procedures , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Male , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/surgery , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
4.
J Orthop Traumatol ; 22(1): 22, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269870

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic fractures (PPFs) are a growing matter for orthopaedic surgeons, and patients with PPFs may represent a frail target in the case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether hospital reorganisations during the most severe phase of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affected standards of care and early outcomes of patients treated for PPFs in Northern Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were retrieved from a multicentre retrospective orthopaedics and traumatology database, including 14 hospitals. The following parameters were studied: demographics, results of nasopharyngeal swabs, prevalence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), comorbidities, general health status (EQ-5D-5L Score), frailty (Clinical Frailty Scale, CFS), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), anaesthesiologic risk (American Society of Anaesthesiology Score, ASA Score), classification (unified classification system, UCS), type of operation and anaesthesia, in-hospital and early complications (Clavien-Dindo Classification, CDC), and length of stay (LOS). Data were analysed by means of descriptive statistics. Out of 1390 patients treated for any reason, 38 PPFs were included. RESULTS: Median age was 81 years (range 70-96 years). Twenty-three patients (60.5%) were swabbed on admission, and two of them (5.3%) tested positive; in three patients (7.9%), the diagnosis of COVID-19 was established on a clinical and radiological basis. Two more patients tested positive post-operatively, and one of them died due to COVID-19. Thirty-three patients (86.8%) presented a proximal femoral PPF. Median ASA Score was 3 (range, 1-4), median VAS score on admission was 3 (range, 0-6), median CFS was 4 (range, 1-8), median EQ-5D-5L Score was 3 in each one of the categories (range, 1-5). Twenty-three patients (60.5%) developed post-operative complications, and median CDC grade was 3 (range, 1-5). The median LOS was 12.8 days (range 2-36 days), and 21 patients (55.3%) were discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of PPFs did not seem to change during the lockdown. Patients were mainly elderly with comorbidities, and complications were frequently recorded post-operatively. Despite the difficult period for the healthcare system, hospitals were able to provide effective conventional surgical treatments for PPFs, which were not negatively influenced by the reorganisation. Continued efforts are required to optimise the treatment of these frail patients in the period of the pandemic, minimising the risk of contamination, and to limit the incidence of PPFs in the future. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Restructuring , Infection Control , Pandemics , Periprosthetic Fractures , Standard of Care , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Comorbidity , Female , Frailty/epidemiology , Hospital Restructuring/organization & administration , Hospital Restructuring/standards , Hospital Restructuring/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Periprosthetic Fractures/complications , Periprosthetic Fractures/epidemiology , Periprosthetic Fractures/surgery , Periprosthetic Fractures/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care/standards , Standard of Care/statistics & numerical data
5.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(6): 390-394, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223791

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is the most serious health crisis of our time. Global public measures have been enacted to try to prevent healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. The trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) community has overcome challenges in order to continue to deliver acute trauma care to patients and plan for challenges ahead. This review explores the lessons learnt, the priorities and the controversies that the T&O community has faced during the crisis. Historically, the experience of major incidents in T&O has focused on mass casualty events. The current pandemic requires a different approach to resource management in order to create a long-term, system-sustaining model of care alongside a move towards resource balancing and facilitation. Significant limitations in theatre access, anaesthetists and bed capacity have necessitated adaptation. Strategic changes to trauma networks and risk mitigation allowed for ongoing surgical treatment of trauma. Outpatient care was reformed with the uptake of technology. The return to elective surgery requires careful planning, restructuring of elective pathways and risk management. Despite the hope that mass vaccination will lift the pressure on bed capacity and on bleak economic forecasts, the orthopaedic community must readjust its focus to meet the challenge of huge backlogs in elective caseloads before looking to the future with a robust strategy of integrated resilient pathways. The pandemic will provide the impetus for research that defines essential interventions and facilitates the implementation of strategies to overcome current barriers and to prepare for future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Priorities , Orthopedic Procedures , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Health Priorities/standards , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Traumatology/organization & administration , Traumatology/standards
6.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 39, 2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this article is to summarize the epidemiologic characteristics and double-buffered strategy for patients in orthopedic surgery during the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, based on our own experience in our hospital. METHODS: A retrospective and comparative study was performed to identify all inpatients at our clinic from February 17 to April 20, 2020 (epidemic group), and from February 17 to April 20, 2019 (control group). Epidemiologic characteristics, screening effect, perioperative complications, and nosocomial infection were analyzed. RESULTS: In the epidemic group, 82 patients were identified, a decrease by 76.0% than the 342 patients in the same period in the 2019. Patients in the epidemic group (54.6 ± 20.2 years) were older than those in the control group (49.6 ± 22.5 years). For the epidemic group, the proportion rates of traumatic factures (69.5%) and low-energy injuries (86.0%) were higher than that in the control group, respectively (35.4% and 37.2%). The preoperative waiting time (7.0 ± 2.6 days) in the epidemic group was longer than that in the control group (4.5 ± 2.1 days). The postoperative complication rate (12.2%) in the epidemic group was higher than that in the control group (3.5%). No nosocomial infection of orthopedic staff and patients with COVID-19 was noted in the epidemic group. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, orthopedic inpatients showed unique epidemiological characteristics. The double-buffered strategy could effectively avoid nosocomial infections among medical staff and patients. Doctors should fully evaluate the perioperative risks and complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
7.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 103(16): e65, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186645

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 crisis has challenged the U.S. health-care system in a variety of ways, including how we teach and train orthopaedic surgery residents and fellows. During the spring of 2020, the cessation of all elective surgical procedures and the diminished number of outpatient visits challenged graduate medical education. While residency programs in less affected areas may not have had to make many dramatic adjustments, some of those located in pandemic hotspots had to redirect trainees from orthopaedic rotations to COVID-19 units. No matter the region, the time that trainees have spent in rotations has been altered, and absences have occurred due to quarantines. This symposium summarizes the impact of restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic on residency and fellowship programs from the perspectives of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), a program director, and a graduating resident. Although new opportunities for virtual curricula, virtual surgical simulation, and virtual interviews have been innovated, residency programs and residents report primarily a negative effect from the pandemic due to decreased surgical volumes and the limitation of patient-care experiences. Ultimately, program directors have an obligation to the program, the trainee, and the general public to graduate only those residents and fellows who are truly prepared to practice independently; they have the responsibility of making the final decision regarding graduation. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to underscore the need for competency-based medical education. Assessing competency includes evaluation of the knowledge, the operative skills, the nonoperative patient-care skills, and the professional behavior of each and every individual graduating from orthopaedic residency and fellowship training programs. A hybrid model for time and competency-based training, with established national standards not only for accreditation for our training programs but also for board certification of our graduating residents, was enhanced by the COVID-19 pandemic and is highlighted in this symposium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Orthopedics/education , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , United States
8.
S Afr Med J ; 111(3): 240-244, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168067

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the global surgery landscape. OBJECTIVES: To analyse and describe the initial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on orthopaedic surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital, a tertiary academic hospital in South Africa. METHODS: The number of orthopaedic surgical cases, emergency theatre patient waiting times, and numbers of outpatient clinic visits, ward admissions, bed occupancies and total inpatient days for January - April 2019 (pre-COVID-19) were compared with the same time frame in 2020 (COVID-19). The COVID-19 timeframe included initiation of a national 'hard lockdown' from 26 March 2020, in preparation for an increasing volume of COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: April 2020, the time of the imposed hard lockdown, was the most affected month, although the number of surgical cases had started to decrease slowly during the 3 preceding months. The total number of surgeries, outpatient visits and ward admissions decreased significantly during April 2020 (55.2%, 69.1% and 60.6%, respectively) compared with April 2019 (p<0.05). Trauma cases were reduced by 40% in April 2020. Overall emergency theatre patient waiting time was 30% lower for April 2020 compared with 2019. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 and the associated lockdown has heavily impacted on both orthopaedic inpatient and outpatient services. Lockdown led to a larger reduction in the orthopaedic trauma burden than in international centres, but the overall reduction in surgeries, outpatient visits and hospital admissions was less. This lesser reduction was probably due to local factors, but also to a conscious decision to avoid total collapse of our surgical services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Waiting Lists
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 96, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154826

ABSTRACT

Introduction: the purpose of this study was to assess the orthopaedic surgeons' perceptions and attitudes on COVID-19 related changes in their practice. Methods: an online survey was shared with orthopaedic surgeons practicing in different countries. Results: this study showed that orthopaedic surgery plan management was adapted to respond more effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic while maintaining the continuity of health care and ensuring protection of medical staff and patients. Among the introduced measures, elective surgery was postponed to free-up beds for suspected or COVID-19 positive patients requiring hospitalization. Additionally, the number of outpatient visits was considerably decreased and non-urgent visits were postponed to reduce the flow of patients in and out of hospitals and therefore minimize the risk of contamination. Interestingly, data revealed the willingness of orthopaedic surgeons to take care of COVID-19 positive patients and support their colleagues in intensive care units, if needed. Conclusion: orthopaedic surgery departments have adapted their programs to face the unprecedented challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Quick measures were taken to reduce the risk of contamination in patients, medical staff and to allow hospitals to free up beds for treatment of patients with positive or suspected COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Surgeons/organization & administration , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Perception , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 479(8): 1691-1699, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132600

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are asymptomatic. The prevalence of COVID-19 in orthopaedic populations will vary depending on the time and place where the sampling is performed. The idea that asymptomatic carriers play a role is generalizable but has not been studied in large populations of patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. We therefore evaluated this topic in one large, metropolitan city in a state that had the ninth-most infections in the United States at the time this study was completed (June 2020). This work was based on a screening and testing protocol that required all patients to be tested for COVID-19 preoperatively. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) What is the prevalence of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection in patients planning to undergo orthopaedic surgery in one major city, in order to provide other surgeons with a framework for assessing COVID-19 rates in their healthcare system? (2) How did patients with positive test results for COVID-19 differ in terms of age, sex, and orthopaedic conditions? (3) What proportion of patients had complications treated, and how many patients had a symptomatic COVID-19 infection within 30 days of surgery (recognizing that some may have been missed and so our estimates of event rates will necessarily underestimate the frequency of this event)? METHODS: All adult patients scheduled for surgery at four facilities (two tertiary care hospitals, one orthopaedic specialty hospital, and one ambulatory surgery center) at a single institution in the Philadelphia metropolitan area from April 27, 2020 to June 12, 2020 were included in this study. A total of 1295 patients were screened for symptoms, exposure, temperature, and oxygen saturation via a standardized protocol before surgical scheduling; 1.5% (19 of 1295) were excluded because they had COVID-19 symptoms, exposure, or recent travel based on the initial screening questionnaire, leaving 98.5% (1276 of 1295) who underwent testing for COVID-19 preoperatively. All 1276 patients who passed the initial screening test underwent nasopharyngeal swabbing for COVID-19 via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction before surgery. The mean age at the time of testing was 56 ± 16 years, and 53% (672 of 1276) were men. Eighty-seven percent (1106), 8% (103), and 5% (67) were tested via the Roche, Abbott, and Cepheid assays, respectively. All patients undergoing elective surgery were tested via the Roche assay, while those undergoing nonelective surgery received either the Abbott or Cepheid assay, based on availability. Patients with positive test results undergoing elective surgery had their procedures rescheduled, while patients scheduled for nonelective surgery underwent surgery regardless of their test results. Additionally, we reviewed the records of all patients at 30 days postoperatively for emergency room visits, readmissions, and COVID-19-related complications via electronic medical records and surgeon-reported complications. However, we had no method for definitively determining how many patients had complications, emergency department visits, or readmissions outside our system, so our event rate estimates for these endpoints are necessarily best-case estimates. RESULTS: A total of 0.5% (7 of 1276) of the patients tested positive for COVID-19: five via the Roche assay and two via the Abbott assay. Patients with positive test results were younger than those with negative results (39 ± 12 years versus 56 ± 16 years; p = 0.01). With the numbers available, we found no difference in the proportion of patients with positive test results for COVID-19 based on subspecialty area (examining the lowest and highest point estimates, respectively, we observed: trauma surgery [3%; 2 of 68 patients] versus hip and knee [0.3%; 1 of 401 patients], OR 12 [95% CI 1-135]; p = 0.06). No patients with negative preoperative test results for COVID-19 developed a symptomatic COVID-19 infection within 30 days postoperatively. Within 30 days of surgery, 0.9% (11 of 1276) of the patients presented to the emergency room, and 1.3% (16 of 1276) were readmitted for non-COVID-19-related complications. None of the patients with positive test results for COVID-19 preoperatively experienced complications. However, because some were likely treated outside our healthcare system, the actual percentages may be higher. CONCLUSION: Because younger patients are more likely to be asymptomatic carriers of disease, surgeons should emphasize the importance of taking proper precautions to prevent virus exposure preoperatively. Because the rates of COVID-19 infection differ based on city and time, surgeons should monitor the local prevalence of disease to properly advise patients on the risk of COVID-19 exposure. Further investigation is required to assess the prevalence in the orthopaedic population in cities with larger COVID-19 burdens. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic study.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1128050

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put an enormous burden on healthcare systems. As a direct consequence, many elective procedures were cancelled and available resources were relocated to emergencies and COVID-19 patients. We aimed to analyze the impact on orthopedic surgery in Romania. We performed a retrospective analysis of orthopedics and trauma cases admitted over the first six months of 2019 and 2020 in three representative clinics. In total, there were 1900 patients: 1241 from Timisoara, 216 from Cluj-Napoca, and 443 from Bucharest. In April, activity for all cases in the regional trauma center dropped to 23.8% and stopped in the other two. No arthroscopies or elective joint replacements were performed in April. By June, hospital admissions resumed for trauma cases while arthroscopies and joint replacements still lagged behind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Romania/epidemiology
12.
Hand Surg Rehabil ; 40(3): 235-240, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126833

ABSTRACT

This work aimed to identify the lead causes of upper limb injury presenting to a busy hand and major trauma unit during the UK COVID-19 domestic lockdown period, in comparison to a cohort from the same period one year previously. Hand and upper limb injuries presenting to the host organization during a pre-lockdown period (23rd March 2019-11th May 2019) and the formal UK lockdown period (23rd March 2020-11th May 2020) were compared, using data collated from the host institution's hand surgery database. The UK lockdown period was associated with a 52% fall in the number of patients presenting to the service with hand and upper limb injuries (589 pre-lockdown vs. 284 during lockdown). There was a significant increase in the proportion of injuries due to machinery use during lockdown (38, 6.5% pre-lockdown vs. 33, 11.6% during lockdown, P = 0.009), other etiologies were consistent. The proportion requiring surgical management were similar (n = 272, 46.2% pre-lockdown vs. n = 138, 48.6% during lockdown, P = 0.50). The proportion requiring overnight admission fell (n = 94, 16.0% pre-lockdown vs. 29, 10.2% during lockdown, P = 0.022). COVID-19 related lockdown in the UK resulted in a reduction in the presenting numbers of hand related injuries; however almost half of these patients still required surgery. These data may be of use to other hand surgery centers for resource planning during future lockdown periods, and for injury prevention strategies in the post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Hand Injuries/epidemiology , Hand Injuries/etiology , Upper Extremity/injuries , Cohort Studies , Hand Injuries/surgery , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Upper Extremity/surgery
13.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 154, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to dramatic disruptions to orthopedic services. The purpose of this study is to quantify the reinstatement of elective orthopedic surgeries of our institution in Shanghai, China, and share our first-hand experiences of how this region is managing the post-outbreak period. METHODS: The number of patients receiving elective orthopedic surgeries was analyzed in the timeframe of 8 months since the start of the pandemic (from January 20 to September 16) and compared with the patients receiving the same treatment during the same period in 2019. And a detailed workflow for handling patients about to receive elective surgeries in the COVID-19 post-outbreak period was described. RESULTS: The number of the selective surgeries in the first 3 months only accounted for 31.72% of the same period in 2019 (p = 0.0031), and the ratio reached 97.47% when it came to the last 5 months (p > 0.9999). The selective surgeries even surpassed the pre-epidemic level in months 7 and 8. And the difference of the surgeries was not significant in the whole eight observed months between 2019 and 2020 (p = 0.1526). No health care providers or hospitalized patients in orthopedic departments in Shanghai have been infected nosocomially. CONCLUSIONS: Elective orthopedic surgeries have been fully recovered from the COVID-19 pandemic in our institution, and the new normalcy established during the post-outbreak period helped this region co-exist with the impact of the virus well. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered, registration number: ChiCTR2000039711 , date of registration: November 6, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , China , Humans , Retrospective Studies
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100118

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put an enormous burden on healthcare systems. As a direct consequence, many elective procedures were cancelled and available resources were relocated to emergencies and COVID-19 patients. We aimed to analyze the impact on orthopedic surgery in Romania. We performed a retrospective analysis of orthopedics and trauma cases admitted over the first six months of 2019 and 2020 in three representative clinics. In total, there were 1900 patients: 1241 from Timisoara, 216 from Cluj-Napoca, and 443 from Bucharest. In April, activity for all cases in the regional trauma center dropped to 23.8% and stopped in the other two. No arthroscopies or elective joint replacements were performed in April. By June, hospital admissions resumed for trauma cases while arthroscopies and joint replacements still lagged behind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Romania/epidemiology
15.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 4(10): e20.00083, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100304

ABSTRACT

Orthopaedic practices have been markedly affected by the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the ban on elective procedures, it is impossible to define the medical urgency of a case solely on whether a case is on an elective surgery schedule. Orthopaedic surgical procedures should consider COVID-19-associated risks and an assimilation of all available disease dependent, disease independent, and logistical information that is tailored to each patient, institution, and region. Using an evidence-based risk stratification of clinical urgency, we provide a framework for prioritization of orthopaedic sport medicine procedures that encompasses such factors. This can be used to facilitate the risk-benefit assessment of the timing and setting of a procedure during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Sports Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Athletic Injuries/surgery , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 23(2): 71-75, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) crisis has affected how hospitals work and has had an effect on orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: To compare patient management and low-energy and high-energy trauma treatment at two orthopedic trauma units during the COVID-19 crisis and to clarify resource demands and preparedness in orthopedic clinics during the state of emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at two orthopedic trauma units from 14 March 2019 to 14 April 2019 and from 14 March 2020 to 14 April 2020. RESULTS: The proportion of patients admitted in the multi-trauma orthopedic unit decreased by one-third, the mean time interval from admission to surgery significantly decreased, and the number of surgeries and mean length of stay in hospital decreased in 2020 compared to the same test period in 2019. In the orthopedic trauma unit, the number of patients and surgeries also decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights changes in orthopedic injury characteristics in two orthopedic units during the COVID-19 crisis in Latvia and compares these changes to data from the same time period one year earlier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Latvia , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Musculoskeletal System/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Young Adult
17.
Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol ; 31(1): 105-109, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of COVID-19 on orthopaedic practice and training in the UK. METHODS: Surgeons throughout UK hospitals were asked to complete an electronic survey relating to orthopaedic practice and training in their hospital. The nationwide survey was conducted during the first peak of COVID-19 cases in the UK between 20 March 2020 and 20 April 2020. RESULTS: All 202 UK participants reported disruption to their daily practice. 91% reported all elective operating had been cancelled and trauma continued as normal in only 24% of cases. 70% reported disruption to trauma operating. Elective clinic capacity significantly reduced with no elective clinics running as normal. 55% reported their elective clinics completely cancelled, whilst 38% reported elective clinics running at a reduced capacity, with non-urgent appointments postponed. Only 9% of fracture clinics ran as normal, and 69% had a reduced service. 67% reported teaching and study leave cancelled. Significantly, 69% of participants felt the pandemic would result in a delay to completion of registrar training programmes. CONCLUSION: This is the first nationwide survey assessing the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on UK orthopaedic practice and training, during the peak of the pandemic. It highlights the scale of the challenge ahead for the specialty, including during the recovery phase and post-recovery phase of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
Orthopedics ; 43(6): 351-355, 2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067820

ABSTRACT

This study was performed to analyze the effect that coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) has had on orthopedic surgeons' practices, their patients, and orthopedic surgeons themselves through a survey distributed to members of the Louisiana Orthopaedic Association (LOA). An anonymous 22-question online survey was created and distributed to 323 LOA members. Of the 323 recipients of the survey, 99 (30.7%) responded. As a part of a multiple response set, in which respondents could choose more than one answer, the majority reported delayed care for routine orthopedic injuries (81 of 97, 83.5%). Almost every surgeon (n=95, 96.0%) reported stopping or delaying elective surgery because of COVID-19 and an increase in pain/disability/deformity in patients due to delay in elective procedures (73 of 97, 75.3%) and delay in seeking care (66 of 97, 68.0%). The majority reported an increased use of telehealth visits (68 of 97, 70.1%), a decrease in patient volume (88 of 97, 90.7%), and a reduction in income (79 of 98, 80.6%) during the past 6 months. A majority of surgeons (58 of 98, 59.2%) reported that they had applied for government assistance or took out loans. Via a multiple response set, respondents indicated that as a result of the pandemic, telehealth will become more widespread (64 of 98, 65.3%) and hospitals will exert a stronger influence over health care (64 of 98, 65.3%). The COVID-19 pandemic has had lasting effects on orthopedic surgeons in Louisiana and their practices, with a substantial decrease in the number of patients treated (90.5%), surgical volume, and revenue (80.6%). Orthopedic surgeons affected by the pandemic could use these data to further understand future challenges with patient care and changing orthopedic practice dynamics during this unique time. [Orthopedics. 2020;43(6):351-355.].


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Surgeons , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Health Care Surveys , Hospital Administration , Humans , Income , Louisiana/epidemiology , Male , Orthopedic Surgeons/economics , Pandemics , Remote Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Acta Biomed ; 91(4): e2020159, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058716

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the pandemic, Piacenza's Orthopedic and Traumatology Dep. firstly dealt with the emergency with the complete closure of all the elective surgical and outpatient activities.As general population, also healthcare workers were affected by Coronavirus, increasing difficulties of epidemic management.The aim of our study is to evaluate the activity trend of the first 6months of 2020 in our hospital.Data will be compared to the two semesters of 2019, in order to have two objective samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed all the orthopedics surgical procedures performed at Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital (Piacenza, Emilia Romagna, Northern Italy)between 1/1/20 and 30/06/20. 2019 semesters (1/01/20-30/6/20 and 1/07/20-31/12/20) have been used as control group to evaluate the activity trend of the first six months of 2020, compared to the two semesters of 2019. RESULTS: We noticed a significant increase of domestic and retirement houses accidents, a consistent increase in one-month mortality rate of 2020 first semester and a decrease of mean hospitalization time.About surgical procedures, we detect a drop in the total number: in the first semester of 2020 we performed 499 (-39.9%) surgeries less than the first semester of 2019 and 337 (-30.9%) then the second one. Traumatology recorded a decrease of 27.6% than the first semester of 2019 (-204 surgeries) and of 26.3% than the second one (-191 surgeries).Concerning orthopedic procedures, in comparison to the first semester of 2019 we registered a reduction of 57.6% (-295 surgeries) and of 40.2% to the second semester (-146 surgeries). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Covid-19 forced a reorganization of the Italian Health System that led to a clear reduction of surgical procedures performed in the orthopedic and traumatology department.The "Phase 2" can't be consider the last step of the emergency.We surely will have to get used to live with this enemy, at least until we will find an effective cure or a vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Forecasting , Hospitals , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors
20.
Int Orthop ; 44(8): 1453-1459, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From February 21, the day of hospitalisation in ICU of the first diagnosed case of Covid-19, the social situation and the hospitals' organisation throughout Italy dramatically changed. METHODS: The CIO (Club Italiano dell'Osteosintesi) is an Italian society devoted to the study of traumatology that counts members spread in public and private hospitals throughout the country. Fifteen members of the CIO, Chairmen of 15 Orthopaedic and Trauma Units of level 1 or 2 trauma centres in Italy, have been involved in the study. They were asked to record data about surgical, outpatients clinics and ER activity from the 23rd of February to the 4th of April 2020. The data collected were compared with the data of the same timeframe of the previous year (2019). RESULTS: Comparing with last year, overall outpatient activity reduced up to 75%, overall Emergency Room (ER) trauma consultations up to 71%, elective surgical activity reduced up to 100% within two weeks and trauma surgery excluding femoral neck fractures up to 50%. The surgical treatment of femoral neck fractures showed a stable reduction from 15 to 20% without a significant variation during the timeframe. CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 outbreak showed a tremendous impact on all orthopaedic trauma activities throughout the country except for the surgical treatment of femoral neck fractures, which, although reduced, did not change in percentage within the analysed timeframe.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Orthopedics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers , Traumatology
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