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1.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 42(7): e806-e810, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic precluded in-person interviews for the 2020-2021 fellowship application cycle and may impact future interview cycles. No information is available detailing the implications of a virtual format on either the interviewee or the fellowship program. METHODS: Two surveys regarding the 2020-2021 virtual interview season were developed and distributed by the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) Fellowship Training and Practice Qualifications Committee: one survey for fellowship applicants and one survey for fellowship program directors. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 45 pediatric orthopaedic fellowship applicants and 34 fellowship program directors. Nineteen (42.2%) applicants applied to more programs because of the virtual format and 30 (66.7%) applicants accepted more interviews because of the virtual format. Thirty-one (67%) applicants did not feel the virtual interview format negatively affected their match process. Thirty-eight (84.4%) applicants indicated that they saved >$2000 with the virtual format. Approximately half (22/45, 48.5%) of the applicants would keep the fellowship-interview process virtual-even if in-person interviews were possible-whereas 8 (17.8%) applicants would transition back toward in-person interviews.Most program directors utilized online interviews for the first time (n=28, 82.3%) during the 2020-2021 application cycle. Programs interviewed more applicants for the 2020-2021 cycle than in the prior 5 years (19.3 vs. 15.7 applicants, P <0.01), with programs interviewing 10.1 applicants per fellowship position. The majority (n=22, 64.7%) of programs utilized Zoom for the interview platform. Program directors indicated that the applicants were either more accomplished (n=14, 41.2%) or similar in accomplishment (n=20, 58.8%) when compared with the applicants from prior years. Half of the program directors (n=17, 50%) surveyed would utilize virtual interviews next year, even if in-person interviews are possible. CONCLUSIONS: During the 2020-2021 fellowship application process, interviewees applied to and were interviewed at more programs because of the virtual format, while saving >$2000. In a similar manner, fellowship programs were able to interview a greater number of applicants without adversely impacting the applicant quality. Approximately half of the interviewees and program directors would continue to perform virtual interviews, even if in-person interviews are possible. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level V.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Child , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 480(6): 1053-1054, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860950
4.
Orthopedics ; 45(4): e207-e210, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732316

ABSTRACT

The field of orthopedic surgery continues to grow rapidly in popularity. Ninety percent of orthopedic residents pursue fellowship training after residency, representing the highest rate of subspecialty training among surgical specialties. The goal of this study was to determine the factors considered most important by pediatric orthopedic fellowship program directors (PDs) in evaluating applicants and determining a rank list. A web-based survey was sent to all 42 US pediatric orthopedic fellowship programs. The PDs were contacted through publicly accessible email addresses found on program websites or the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America website. Respondents were asked to indicate the fellowship program size and the number of applicants interviewed and ranked each year. The PDs were then asked to rank a list of 12 factors to reflect the relative importance of these criteria in evaluating fellowship applicants. Three emails were sent: 1 at the initial survey release and 2 reminder emails at 2 and 4 weeks. Surveys were anonymous. The overall response rate was 69% (29 of 42). Of the responding PDs, 48% (14 of 29) indicated that the interview was the most important factor in ranking fellowship applicants, whereas 31% (9 of 29) considered the applicant's letters of recommendation most important. Personal connections to the applicant or letter writer and research experience were each considered most important by 10% of responding PDs. Nearly half (48%) of responding PDs considered in-person interviews the most important factor in ranking fellowship applicants. Our results provide useful information for medical students and orthopedic residents planning to pursue fellowship training in pediatric orthopedics. [Orthopedics. 2022;45(4):e207-210.].


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Child , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 6(1)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: When the COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of visiting subinternships, we pivoted to create a virtual orthopaedic rotation (VOR). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the VOR on the residency selection process and determine the role of such a rotation in the future. METHODS: A committee was convened to create a VOR to replace visiting orthopaedic rotations for medical students who are interested in pursuing a career in orthopaedic surgery. The VOR was reviewed and sanctioned by our medical school, but no academic credit was granted. We conducted three 3-week VOR sessions. During each session, virtual rotators participated in regularly scheduled educational conferences and attended an invitation-only daily conference in the evenings that was designed for a medical student audience. In addition, students were paired with faculty and resident mentors in a structured mentorship program. Students' orthopaedic knowledge was assessed using prerotation and postrotation tests. RESULTS: From July to September 2020, 61 students from 37 distinct medical schools participated in the VOR. Notable improvements were observed in prerotation and postrotation orthopaedic knowledge test scores. In postrotation surveys, both students and faculty expressed high satisfaction with the curriculum but less certainty about how well they got to know each other. In the subsequent residency application cycle, 27.9% of the students who participated in the VOR were selected to interview, compared with 8.7% of the total application pool. DISCUSSION: The VOR was a valuable substitute for in-person clinical rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although not likely to be a replacement for conventional away rotations, the VOR is a possible adjunct to in-person clinical rotations in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 479(3): 461-462, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349809
9.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 30(3): 91-99, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319815

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Proposals for substantive reforms to the orthopaedic resident selection process are growing, given increasing applicant competitiveness, burgeoning inefficiencies and inequities of the current system, and impending transition of Step 1 to pass/fail. The COVID-19 pandemic has further catalyzed the need for reforms, offering unprecedented opportunities to pilot novel changes. However, a comprehensive collation of all proposed and implemented orthopaedic reforms is currently lacking. Thus, we aimed to characterize proposed orthopaedic-specific resident selection reforms in the context of reforms implemented by other specialties. METHODS: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched for references proposing reforms to the orthopaedic resident selection process published from 2005 to 2020. An inductive approach to qualitative content analysis was used to categorize reforms. RESULTS: Twenty-six articles proposing 13 unique reforms to the orthopaedic resident selection process were identified. The most commonly proposed reforms included noncognitive assessments (n = 8), application caps (n = 7), standardized letters of recommendation (n = 5), program-specific supplemental applications (n = 5), creation of a centralized database of standardized program information (n = 4), use of a standardized applicant composite score (n = 4), and a moratorium on postinterview communication (n = 4). Importantly, nearly all of these reforms have also been proposed or implemented by other specialties. DISCUSSION: Numerous reforms to the orthopaedic resident selection process have been suggested over the past 15 years, several of which have been implemented on a program-specific basis, including noncognitive assessments, supplemental applications, and standardized letters of recommendation. Careful examination of applicant and program experiences and Match outcomes after these reforms is imperative to inform future directions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , School Admission Criteria
10.
Int Orthop ; 45(8): 1911-1922, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252110

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Residency programs in the medical education field are considered the keystone in the development of aptitude and skills required for practice. With the worldwide current scenario of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a shift in the paradigm especially in the teaching of the residents from face-to-face classes to more and more online sessions. The purpose of this study is to present a compendium of knowledge-providing sites, smartphone applications (apps), YouTube channels, and podcasts that can provide better online resource management for students in the field of orthopaedics. METHODS: Search terms were used for making a list of various online resources which can be of help during orthopaedic residency. An initial list of the selected websites, smartphone apps, podcasts, and YouTube channels was made. The corresponding author with years of teaching experience and faculty for post-graduate and fellowship training programs then selected the final list. RESULTS: A list of 16 websites with brief points on their content and online address along with the availability of free or paid content was identified as being appropriate. A total of 39 apps available for android/apple smartphones, nine podcasts, and 11 YouTube channels were also identified as being extremely useful and have been discussed elaborately in this article. CONCLUSION: Online educational tools are of immense importance in imparting adequate knowledge to an orthopaedic resident and act as an adjunct to conventional teaching methods. This article focuses on presenting various online educational resources in a simple yet concise way, which may be beneficial for the current generation of residents especially in this current time of unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 103(16): e65, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186645

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 crisis has challenged the U.S. health-care system in a variety of ways, including how we teach and train orthopaedic surgery residents and fellows. During the spring of 2020, the cessation of all elective surgical procedures and the diminished number of outpatient visits challenged graduate medical education. While residency programs in less affected areas may not have had to make many dramatic adjustments, some of those located in pandemic hotspots had to redirect trainees from orthopaedic rotations to COVID-19 units. No matter the region, the time that trainees have spent in rotations has been altered, and absences have occurred due to quarantines. This symposium summarizes the impact of restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic on residency and fellowship programs from the perspectives of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), a program director, and a graduating resident. Although new opportunities for virtual curricula, virtual surgical simulation, and virtual interviews have been innovated, residency programs and residents report primarily a negative effect from the pandemic due to decreased surgical volumes and the limitation of patient-care experiences. Ultimately, program directors have an obligation to the program, the trainee, and the general public to graduate only those residents and fellows who are truly prepared to practice independently; they have the responsibility of making the final decision regarding graduation. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to underscore the need for competency-based medical education. Assessing competency includes evaluation of the knowledge, the operative skills, the nonoperative patient-care skills, and the professional behavior of each and every individual graduating from orthopaedic residency and fellowship training programs. A hybrid model for time and competency-based training, with established national standards not only for accreditation for our training programs but also for board certification of our graduating residents, was enhanced by the COVID-19 pandemic and is highlighted in this symposium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Orthopedics/education , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , United States
15.
Orthop Clin North Am ; 52(1): xi, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1093185
17.
J Surg Educ ; 78(5): 1629-1636, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071726

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Haitian Annual Assembly of Orthopaedic Trauma (HAAOT) is an annual continuing medical education (CME) conference for Haitian orthopedists and trainees converted to a pilot virtual format in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We evaluated this virtual format's effectiveness at teaching, facilitating bilingual discussion, and encouraging cross-cultural exchange of experiences - all aimed at improving orthopedic knowledge in a low-resource country like Haiti. DESIGN: Planned collaboratively between North American and Haitian colleagues, the conference involved 4 bilingual weekly Zoom meetings comprised of 4 to 6 prerecorded presentations and live-translated discussion. Pre- and postmeeting knowledge assessments in French (Haitian language of medical instruction) were administered weekly with results compared via 2-sample t-tests. An online postconference survey evaluated attendee satisfaction with the virtual format. SETTING: Virtual. PARTICIPANTS: Weekly attendance involved approximately 50 Haitian orthopedists and trainees, with 20 to 25 completing pre- and postmeeting assessments. RESULTS: Statistically significant increases between pre/post scores were seen during 3 of 4 sessions. Session-wide significant score increases occurred for residents and attending surgeons with <10 years of experience. 85.7% of attendees reported the virtual platform exceeded expectations and 100% indicated likely or extremely likely participation in further virtual events. CONCLUSIONS: The pilot virtual HAAOT was extremely well received with high desire for future sessions. Beyond short-term knowledge retention among attendees, nonmeasurable benefits included collaboration between orthopedists and trainees in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Haiti, and Burkina Faso. As COVID-19 spurs online learning in high-income nations, the successful low-resource context adjustments and local partnership underlying this model attest that travel restrictions need not impede delivery of virtual CME conferences in lower-income nations. Attendee learning and the decreased cost and travel requirements allude to this platform's sustainability and reproducibility in facilitating future international education and capacity building. Further studies will assess long-term retention of presented material.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Continuing , Haiti , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Arthroplasty ; 36(6): 2223-2226, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has created a void in surgical education. Given social distancing and postponed surgeries, unique educational opportunities have arisen. Attendings from 10 adult reconstruction fellowships led a multi-institution web-based weekly collaborative, the Arthroplasty Consortium (AC), developed to educate trainees through complex arthroplasty case-based discussions. METHODS: We performed an anonymous survey of AC participants and American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) adult reconstruction fellows. Participants were polled with regards to educational tools used before and after COVID-19 and their value. Specifically, participation in the AC, AAHKS FOCAL (Fellows Orthopedic Continued AAHKS Learning) lectures, institutional lectures, industry lectures, textbooks, online videos, journal articles, and webinars was assessed. RESULTS: Fifty-seven participants responded with 49 (86%) at the fellow level. There was an increase in the use of web-based learning, including the AC (Not applicable pre, 61% post), AAHKS FOCAL lectures (Not applicable pre, 82% post), industry lectures (53% pre, 86% post), and AAHKS/AAOS webinars (35% pre, 56% post). Usage declined with institutional lectures (89% pre, 80% post), textbooks (68% pre, 49% post), and journal articles (97% pre, 90% post), with minimal change in the use of online surgical videos (84% pre, 82% post). The majority of fellows not involved in the AC would like to see the addition of a multi-institutional case conference added to fellowship education. Of AC participants, the 2 most valuable educational tools were the AC and FOCAL lectures. CONCLUSION: Trainee education has changed post-COVID-19 with a greater focus on web-based learning. Multi-institutional collaborative lectures and case-based discussions have significant perceived value among trainees and should be considered important educational tools post-COVID 19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Adult , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Orthopedics/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
19.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(3): 1179-1190, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067815

ABSTRACT

Introduction: There are few studies that compare the cadaver dissections with the medical simulators in means of talent improvement. Therefore, the aim of this study is to find out if using cadaver dissections is still the golden standard for surgical training or using the medical simulators in surgery could replace cadaver dissections. Materials and methods: The study is conducted during the European Orthopaedics & Traumatology Education Platform accredited Shoulder Club International Cadaver Course including a number of 34 orthopedics trainees. The participants were randomly divided into two groups to be trained with the simulator (Group 1) and on cadavers (Group 2), followed by a test performed on shoulder arthroscopy simulator (Virtamed ArthroS, Switzerland). There was no conflict of interest before, during, or after the study. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. Results: Group 2 had statistically significant higher simulation overview procedure time values than Group 1 (p < 0.05), the meaning of which is participants trained with the simulator completed the given tasks in a shorter period of time. Group 2 had statistically significant higher scratching of humerus cartilage values than Group 1 (p < 0.05), which means that participants trained with simulation have less scratching done on the humerus cartilage than the participants trained on a cadaver. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first one to compare virtual reality (VR) simulators with cadavers for surgical education in an objective manner, while using qualitative and quantitative data. According to this study, it is possible to state that VR simulators are just as effective as cadavers in means of training subjects. As medical education will face a total change all around the world after the COVID-19 pandemic, this study has the potential to be an important guide during and after this period.


Subject(s)
Arthroscopy/education , Cadaver , Education, Medical/methods , Orthopedics/education , Shoulder Joint/surgery , Shoulder/surgery , Virtual Reality , Adult , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Computer Simulation , Humans , Male , Pandemics
20.
Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol ; 31(1): 105-109, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of COVID-19 on orthopaedic practice and training in the UK. METHODS: Surgeons throughout UK hospitals were asked to complete an electronic survey relating to orthopaedic practice and training in their hospital. The nationwide survey was conducted during the first peak of COVID-19 cases in the UK between 20 March 2020 and 20 April 2020. RESULTS: All 202 UK participants reported disruption to their daily practice. 91% reported all elective operating had been cancelled and trauma continued as normal in only 24% of cases. 70% reported disruption to trauma operating. Elective clinic capacity significantly reduced with no elective clinics running as normal. 55% reported their elective clinics completely cancelled, whilst 38% reported elective clinics running at a reduced capacity, with non-urgent appointments postponed. Only 9% of fracture clinics ran as normal, and 69% had a reduced service. 67% reported teaching and study leave cancelled. Significantly, 69% of participants felt the pandemic would result in a delay to completion of registrar training programmes. CONCLUSION: This is the first nationwide survey assessing the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on UK orthopaedic practice and training, during the peak of the pandemic. It highlights the scale of the challenge ahead for the specialty, including during the recovery phase and post-recovery phase of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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