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2.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 855-857, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434031

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Recurrent acute otitis media is common in children. The preferred treatment measures for recurrent acute otitis media have a mixed evidence base. This study sought to assess baseline practice across ENT departments in England. METHODS: A national telephone survey of healthcare staff was conducted. Every ENT centre in England was contacted. A telephone script was used to ask about antibiotic and grommet use and duration in recurrent acute otitis media cases. RESULTS: Ninety-six centres (74 per cent) provided complete information. Recurrent acute otitis media treatment across England by ENT departments varied. The antibiotic first- and second-line prophylaxis offered varies, with trimethoprim used in 33 centres and 29 centres not offering any antibiotics. The timing or choice about when to use grommets also varies, but 87 centres (91 per cent) offer grommet surgery at one stage. CONCLUSION: The treatments received by children in England for recurrent acute otitis media vary by centre; collaborative research in this area is advised.


Subject(s)
Middle Ear Ventilation/statistics & numerical data , Otitis Media/drug therapy , Otolaryngology/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Acute Disease , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary/administration & dosage , Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary/therapeutic use , Child , Drug Resistance, Microbial , England/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Ear Ventilation/methods , Otitis Media/surgery , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Personal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Recurrence , State Medicine/organization & administration , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Trimethoprim/administration & dosage , Trimethoprim/therapeutic use
3.
South Med J ; 114(6): 327-333, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249740

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Otolaryngologists in Texas have been greatly affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Executive orders and professional recommendations have changed the way otolaryngologists practice. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of COVID-19 on otolaryngologists in the state of Texas. METHODS: We surveyed the Texas Association of Otolaryngology to evaluate burnout, research output, and ability to respond to the pandemic. We also looked at the effect of Texas governmental executive orders GA-09 and GA-15 on work hours and patient load. RESULTS: Our survey showed no significant difference in personnel contracting COVID-19 with perception of adequate personal protective equipment (P = 0.203), population density (P = 0.445), or type of practice (P = 0.763). The phenomenon of "pandemic burnout" was prevalent, with prolonged uncertainty the primary contributing factor for burnout caused by the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The response to COVID-19 and the course of the pandemic are continuing to evolve and may play a significant role in how otolaryngologists practice and on their well-being during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Surveys and Questionnaires , Texas , Uncertainty , Workload
4.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 36850421998487, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207543

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic had a significant impact on the Italian healthcare system, although geographical differences were present; regions in northern Italy have been the most severely affected while regions in the south of the country were relatively spared. Otolaryngologists were actively involved in the management of the pandemic. In this work, we analyzed and compared the otolaryngology surgical activity performed during the pandemic in two large public hospitals located in different Italian regions. In northern Italy, otolaryngologists were mainly involved in performing surgical tracheotomies in COVID-19 positive patients and contributed to the management of these patients in intensive care units. In central Italy, where the burden of the infection was significantly lower, otolaryngologists focused on diagnosis and treatment of emergency and oncology patients. This analysis confirms the important role of the otolaryngology specialists during the pandemic, but also highlights specific differences between two large hospitals in different Italian regions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/surgery , COVID-19/virology , Geography , Hospitals , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tracheotomy
5.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 29(3): 187-193, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197059

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus Disease-19, (COVID-19) has challenged the customary practice of speech language pathologists (SLPs) in the acute care hospital arena, particularly in patients with swallowing disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: In this article, we present themes that emerged from qualitative interviews in which 15 SLPs in a tertiary academic medical center in Boston share their clinical experience caring for over 500 patients with COVID-19: triumphs, concerns, and fears. SUMMARY: The broad themes addressed include adapting to practice laced with fear and uncertainty about safety for themselves and their decision making, coming to terms with disparate and unpredictable clinical presentation, teamwork and collaboration and relationships with their patients despite physical and language barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Deglutition Disorders/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Attitude of Health Personnel , Boston , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Decision-Making , Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis , Deglutition Disorders/etiology , Fear , Humans
6.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 50(1): 24, 2021 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID) pandemic has resulted in an increase in virtual care. While some specialties are well suited to virtual care, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery could be limited due to reliance on physical examination and nasal endoscopy, including Rhinology. It is likely virtual care will remain integrated for the foreseeable future and it is important to determine the strengths and weaknesses of this treatment modality for rhinology. METHODS: A survey on virtual care in rhinology was distributed to 61 Canadian rhinologists. The primary objective was to determine how virtual care compared to in-person care in each area of a typical appointment. Other areas focused on platforms used to deliver virtual care and which patients could be appropriately assessed by virtual visits. RESULTS: 43 participants responded (response rate 70.5%). The majority of participants use the telephone as their primary platform. History taking and reviewing results (lab work, imaging) were reported to be equivalent in virtual care. Non-urgent follow up and new patients were thought to be the most appropriate for virtual care. The inability to perform exams and nasal endoscopy were reported to be significant limitations. CONCLUSION: It is important to understand the strengths and limitations of virtual care. These results identify the perceived strengths and weaknesses of virtual care in rhinology, and will help rhinologists understand the role of virtual care in their practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Canada/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 29(3): 230-234, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158041

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To overview the rise of virtual tools to propagate academia and clinical service within Africa, in the field of otolaryngology, propelled by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: The rise of the COVID-19 virus saw a dramatic reduction in elective surgery and outpatient services with a subsequent reduction in experiential learning for trainees. This has spurred the rising trend to maintain the mission of education and clinical service, virtually. There have been unprecedented levels of international collaboration in the 'pandemic year of 2020' that has seen various platforms conceived to harmonize varying practices from global experts towards the ultimate goal of education propagation and improved patient care. The continent of Africa, amidst its own unique challenges, has boldly stepped into the virtual realm in form of a resident-centred platform coined University Of Cape Town-Africa Virtual ENT, and two multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings: the African Head and Neck Society Virtual Tumour Board and the African Virtual Cochlear Implant Meeting. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic will have long-lasting effects on clinical practice and training programs globally. This has demanded academicians to re-imagine novel ways to buoy academia and maintain international collaboration in an inexpensive and convenient way to nourish the sacred mission of education and clinical service within our spirited continent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/education , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Africa , Humans , Telemedicine/organization & administration
8.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 241-245, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Utilisation of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 has been recommended during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for the assessment of head and neck cancer referrals. As limited data were available, this study was conducted to analyse the use of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 in clinical practice. METHOD: Patients undergoing telephone triage in a two-week wait referral clinic were included. Data were collected and analysed using appropriate methods. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients in the study were risk-stratified into low-risk (51.6 per cent, 33 of 64), moderate-risk (14.1 per cent, 9 of 64) and high-risk (34.4 per cent, 22 of 64) groups. Of the patients, 53.1 per cent (34 of 64) avoided an urgent hospital visit, and 96.9 per cent (62 of 64) were cancer free, while 3.1 per cent (2 of 64) were found to have a head and neck malignancy. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy were 50.00 per cent, 66.13 per cent, 99.92 per cent and 66.11 per cent, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to use the calculator for triaging purposes, but it must always be accompanied by a meticulous clinical thought process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Sensitivity and Specificity , Telephone , Time Factors , United Kingdom
9.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 191-195, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104392

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 has necessitated changes to 'usual' ways of practice in otolaryngology, with a view towards out-patient or ambulatory management of appropriate conditions. This paper reviews the available evidence for out-patient management of three of the most common causes for emergency referral to the otolaryngology team: tonsillitis, peri-tonsillar abscess and epistaxis. METHODS: A literature review was performed, searching all available online databases and resources. The Medical Subject Headings 'tonsillitis', 'pharyngotonsillitis', 'quinsy', 'peritonsillar abscess' and 'epistaxis' were used. Papers discussing out-patient management were reviewed by the authors. RESULTS: Out-patient and ambulatory pathways for tonsillitis and peritonsillar abscess are well described for patients meeting appropriate criteria. Safe discharge of select patients is safe and should be encouraged in the current clinical climate. Safe discharge of patients with epistaxis who have bleeding controlled is also well described. CONCLUSION: In select cases, tonsillitis, quinsy and epistaxis patients can be safely managed out of hospital, with low re-admission rates.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epistaxis/therapy , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Peritonsillar Abscess/therapy , Tonsillitis/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration
11.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(4): 102960, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083834

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Telemedicine use in otolaryngology waxed and waned during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in the U.S. Assessing the patterns of telemedicine use and its perceived limitations during the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 allows identification and correction of impediments to consistent telemedicine use by otolaryngologists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Full-time faculty of 2 academic otolaryngology departments in New York City were surveyed regarding their telemedicine use from March through August 2020 during the "first wave" of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on these findings, a method of "augmented outpatient otolaryngology teleconsultation" designed to enhance the quality of the physical examination was developed and employed from August to December 2020. Patients receiving this augmented teleconsult were anonymously surveyed about their telemedical experience. RESULTS: Telemedicine use by faculty was minimal prior to the pandemic, but as total outpatient volume decreased 65-84% across subspecialties, it was used by all otolaryngologists during COVID-19. Physicians were less confident in making a telemedical diagnosis at all phases of the study in all subspecialties. Patients who had an augmented otolaryngology teleconsultation were satisfied with it, believed it facilitated earlier care, limited the time and cost of travel to the physician's office and felt their physician was able to perform a sufficient physical examination. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 crisis, physicians utilized teleotolaryngology to provide care but were less satisfied with their ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Inexpensive direct-to-consumer digital otoscopes can improve the quality of the physical examination provided and can address both patient and physician needs.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Examination , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Young Adult
14.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 130(7): 810-817, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949219

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the patient experience of a virtual otolaryngology clinic visit to an in-person visit, especially with its significantly increased implementation during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patient satisfaction (PS) metrics from the Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey were queried from March 1, 2020 to May 1, 2020 for telehealth visits and January 1, 2020 to March 1, 2020 for in-person visits. Overlapping and comparable questions were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test for independence, and Student's t-test. RESULTS: There were 1284 partial or complete PS surveys from in-person visits and 221 partial or complete virtual PS surveys. There were statistically significantly worse virtual visit evaluations of provider listening, conveyance of information, likelihood to recommend, and overall provider ratings compared to in-person visits. CONCLUSION: Telehealth has become the new norm for most healthcare providers in the United States. This study demonstrates some of the initial shortcomings of telehealth in an otolaryngology practice and identifies challenges with interpersonal communication that may need to be addressed as telehealth becomes increasingly prevalent. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Remote Consultation , Ambulatory Care , California/epidemiology , Communication , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 130(7): 788-795, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic outpatient medicine has drastically been altered how it is delivered. This time period likely represents the largest volume of telehealth visits in the United States health care history. Telehealth presents unique challenges within each subspecialty, and pediatric otolaryngology is no different. This retrospective review was designed to evaluate our division of pediatric otolaryngology's experience with telehealth during the COVID19 pandemic. METHODS: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. All telehealth and face-to-face visits for the month of April 2020 completed by the Pediatric Otolaryngology Division were reviewed. A survey, utilizing both open-ended questions and Likert scaled questions was distributed to the 16 pediatric otolaryngology providers in our group to reflect their experience with telehealth during the 1-month study period. RESULTS: In April, 2020 our outpatient clinic performed a total of 877 clinic visits compared to 2260 clinic visits in April 2019. A total of 769 (88%) were telehealth visits. Telemedicine with video comprised 523 (68%) and telephone only comprised 246 (32%). There were 0 telehealth visits in April 2019. Interpretive services were required in 9.3% (N = 211) clinic visits in April 2019 and 7.5% (N = 66) of clinic visits in April 2020. The survey demonstrated a significant difference (P < .00002) in provider's anticipated telehealth experience (mean 3.94, 95% CI [3.0632, 4.8118] compared to their actual experience after the study period (mean 7.5, 95% CI [7.113, 7.887]. CONCLUSIONS: Despite low initial expectations for telehealth, the majority of our providers felt after 1 month of use that telehealth would continue to be a valuable platform post-pandemic clinical practice. Limited physical exam, particularly otoscopy, nasal endoscopy, and nasolaryngoscopy present challenges. However, with adequate information and preparation for the parents and for the physician some of the obstacles can be overcome.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Satisfaction , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
16.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 162(6): 809-810, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913948

ABSTRACT

More than half of COVID-19 patients are afebrile early in the disease course, yet mildly ill or asymptomatic patients can still spread SARS-CoV-2 with high efficiency. Atypically presenting patients may be seen in noninfectious disease settings such as otolaryngology, which is a specialty prone to occupational exposure. Otolaryngologists have been infected with COVID-19 at higher rates than other specialties in China and other countries. Otolaryngology providers should maintain high clinical suspicion for mild and asymptomatic COVID-19 patients. Protective strategies should be implemented including preappointment screening, triaging, restriction of nonurgent visits and surgeries, telemedicine, and appropriate personal protective equipment use.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Disease Management , Female , Global Health , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Otolaryngologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Universal Precautions/methods
17.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 162(6): 800-803, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913946

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel coronavirus resulting in high mortality in the adult population but low mortality in the pediatric population. The role children and adolescents play in COVID-19 transmission is unclear, and it is possible that healthy pediatric patients serve as a reservoir for the virus. This article serves as a summary of a single pediatric institution's response to COVID-19 with the goal of protecting both patients and health care providers while providing ongoing care to critically ill patients who require urgent interventions. A significant limitation of this commentary is that it reflects a single institution's joint effort at a moment in time but does not take into consideration future circumstances that could change practice patterns. We still hope dissemination of our overall response at this moment, approximately 8 weeks after our region's first adult case, may benefit other pediatric institutions preparing for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pediatrics/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Primary Prevention/methods , Retrospective Studies , State Health Plans/organization & administration , Washington
18.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 139: 110447, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-882582

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the implementation of telemedicine in a pediatric otolaryngology practice during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive paper documenting the development and application of telemedicine in a tertiary academic pediatric otolaryngology practice. RESULTS: A total of 51 established patients were seen via telemedicine within the first 2 weeks of telemedicine implementation. Seven (7) patients were no shows to the appointment. The median patient age was 5 years old, with 55% male patients. Common diagnoses for the visits included sleep disordered breathing/obstructive sleep apnea (25%) and hearing loss (19.64%). Over half (50.98%) of visits were billed at level 4 visit code. DISCUSSION: The majority (88%) of visits during the first 2 weeks of telemedicine implementation in our practice were completed successfully. Reasons that patients did not schedule telemedicine appointments included preference for in person appointments, and lack of adequate device at home to complete telemedicine visit. Limitations to our telemedicine practice included offering telemedicine only to patients who had home internet service, were established patients, and English-speaking. Trainees were not involved in this initial implementation of telemedicine. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has driven the rapid adoption of telemedicine in outpatient medicine. Our group was able to institute an effective telemedicine practice during this time.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Otolaryngology/methods , Pandemics , Pediatrics/methods , Telemedicine/methods
19.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 164(5): 952-958, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-881022

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the rates and primary causes of missed appointments (MAs) for telehealth visits and present remedies for improvement. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was conducted at a tertiary care pediatric otolaryngology practice during expansion of telehealth-based visits. A review of questionnaire responses was performed for 103 consecutive patients with MAs over 50 business days from March 20, 2020, to May 29, 2020. Families were asked a brief survey regarding the cause of the MA and assisted with technical support and rescheduling. MA rates and causes were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall MA rate during the initiation of telehealth services was significantly increased at 12.4% as compared with clinic-based visits of a similar duration before COVID of 5.2% (P < .001). Technical issues were the most common causes of MAs (51.3%). Of the caregivers, 23.8% forgot or reported cancellation of the appointment. Five percent of patients were non-English speaking and scheduled without translator support. Minorities and patients with public insurance represented 53.6% and 61.9% of MAs, respectively. DISCUSSION: Technical difficulties were the most commonly reported cause of missed telehealth appointments. Optimization of applications by providing patient reminders, determining need for translator assistance, and reducing required upload/download speeds may significantly reduce rates of MAs and conversions to other communication. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Clear, concise education materials on the technical aspects of telehealth, platform optimization, and robust technical and administrative support may be necessary to reduced missed telehealth appointments and support large-scale telehealth operations. An assessment of institutional capacity is critical when considering telehealth expansion.


Subject(s)
No-Show Patients/statistics & numerical data , Otolaryngology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Infant , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration
20.
Laryngoscope ; 131(4): 744-759, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-833907

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: Review the published literature of telemedicine's use within otorhinolaryngology (ORL), highlight its successful implementation, and document areas with need of future research. STUDY DESIGN: State of the Art Review. METHODS: Three independent, comprehensive searches for articles published on the subject of telemedicine in ORL were conducted of literature available from January 2000 to April 2020. Search terms were designed to identify studies which examined telemedicine use within ORL. Consensus among authors was used to include all relevant articles. RESULTS: While several, small reports document clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and the cost of telemedicine, much of the literature on telemedicine in ORL is comprised of preliminary, proof-of-concept reports. Further research will be necessary to establish its strengths and limitations. CONCLUSIONS: Particularly during the coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic, telemedicine can, and should, be used within ORL practice. This review can assist in guiding providers in implementing telemedicine that has been demonstrated to be successful, and direct future research. Laryngoscope, 131:744-759, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans
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