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2.
Ir J Med Sci ; 191(6): 2459-2460, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148949
3.
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr ; 52(4)2021 Dec 07.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146516

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine (telephone and video consultations) has increased over the past decades and has grown substantially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multimorbidity, visual - and hearing impairment, cognitive impairment and lack of technical skills might complicate the use of telemedicine in frail elderly patients. Limited research on this topic is has been performed. The aim of this article is to investigate which elements of care could be performed by telemedicine and what patient characteristics are useful in selecting patients for telemedicine. To get more information about the use of telemedicine in frail elderly patients, an online survey was conducted amongst caregivers working in geriatric outpatient care departments in the Netherlands. 67 caregivers completed the survey. The results indicate there is limited experience in video consultations in this population. The experience so far is mainly positive. Caregivers indicate the following elements of care could be performed by telemedicine: follow-up consultations, taking an (hetero)anamnesis, medication review, conversations with multiple contacts or caregivers and informing about test results. Our advice is to decide in dialogue with patient and caregiver, which form of consultation is feasible, desirable and appropriate for every individual process and consultation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Aged , Caregivers , Outpatients , Frail Elderly , Netherlands , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods
4.
Ann Fam Med ; 20(6): 548-550, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140353

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to externally validate 2 simple risk scores for mortality among a mostly inpatient population with COVID-19 in Canada (588 patients for COVID-NoLab and 479 patients for COVID-SimpleLab). The mortality rates in the low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups for COVID-NoLab were 1.1%, 9.6%, and 21.2%, respectively. The mortality rates for COVID-SimpleLab were 0.0%, 9.8%, and 20.0%, respectively. These values were similar to those in the original derivation cohort. The 2 simple risk scores, now successfully externally validated, offer clinicians a reliable way to quickly identify low-risk inpatients who could potentially be managed as outpatients in the event of a bed shortage. Both are available online (https://ebell-projects.shinyapps.io/covid_nolab/ and https://ebell-projects.shinyapps.io/COVID-SimpleLab/).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Prognosis , Canada/epidemiology , Inpatients , Outpatients
5.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2135, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Insomnia and suicidal thoughts are two of the negative impacts that have been caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying the factors that contribute to these psychological problems may help develop strategies to sustain the mental health of the public. The present study examined the psychosocial impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic among different populations in Taiwan, and investigated the relationships between these psychosocial variables, insomnia, and suicidal thoughts. METHODS: Between September 2020 and May 2021, online questionnaires including psychometrically validated scales were distributed to a convenience sample of outpatients (n = 205), healthcare workers (HCWs) (n = 500), and individuals in the general population (n = 1200) in Taiwan to collect data regarding their insomnia severity, suicidal thoughts, fear of COVID-19, trust of information, and resilience. Multivariate logistic regression methods were used to identify variables associated with suicidal thoughts and insomnia. RESULTS: Greater fear of COVID-19 was significantly associated with suicidal thoughts: odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.155 (1.002-1.330) for outpatients; 1.127 (1.035-1.228) for HCWs; and 1.100 (1.130-1.222) for those in the general population. Higher resilience was significantly associated with lower insomnia: OR (95% CI) = 0.819 (0.725-0.926) for outpatients; 0.803 (0.728-0.887), for HCWs; 0.829 (0.785-0.875), and for those in the general population. In addition, there was a statistically significant association between insomnia diagnosis and greater fear of COVID-19 among HCWs (OR [95% CI] = 1.102 [1.062-1.144]) and those in the general population (OR [95% CI] = 1.079 [1.053-1.106]). Among outpatients, there was a statistically significant association between suicidal thoughts and lower trust of information (OR [95% CI] = 0.794 [0.646-0.976]), while among those in the general population there was a statistically significant association between suicidal thoughts and higher insomnia severity (OR [95% CI] = 1.175 [1.13-1.222]). A statistically significant association was also found between insomnia diagnosis and higher suicidal thoughts among those in the general population (OR [95% CI] = 3.455 [2.338-5.106]). CONCLUSIONS: Trust of information, fear, and resilience were important factors for suppressing suicidal thoughts and insomnia among the three study populations. Health policies that monitor psychological status and build resiliency of the public are recommended to help develop tailored strategies for different populations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Outpatients , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Taiwan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116052

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic is the result of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which has caused more than 100 million infections and more than 2.5 million deaths worldwide, representing a serious public health problem. The gold method for detecting this virus is qRT-PCR, which is a semiquantitative technique where the viral load can be established through its cycle threshold (Ct). It has also been reported that COVID-19 generates long-term symptoms (post-COVID-19). METHODS: After three months, a survey was performed on 70 COVID-19 confirmed patients; subsequently, we divided them into four groups (persistent symptoms, chemo-sensitive, cognitive issues, and changes in habit) in order to determine the correlation between viral load and post-COVID-19 symptoms. RESULTS: Data show that fatigue, nervousness, anosmia, and diet changes are common long-term symptoms; in addition, a negative correlation was found between viral load and the number of post-COVID-19 symptoms. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 generates long-term symptoms which can cause problems with psychological and social repercussions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Viral Load , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
8.
Viruses ; 14(11)2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110278

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Molnupiravir and Nirmatrelvir/r (NMV-r) have been proven to reduce severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in unvaccinated high-risk individuals. Data regarding their impact in fully vaccinated vulnerable subjects with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 are still limited, particularly in the era of Omicron and sub-variants. METHODS: Our retrospective study aimed to compare the safety profile and effectiveness of the two antivirals in all consecutive high-risk outpatients between 11 January and 10 July 2022. A logistic regression model was carried out to assess factors associated with the composite outcome defined as all-cause hospitalization and/or death at 30 days. RESULTS: A total of 719 individuals were included: 554 (77%) received Molnupiravir, whereas 165 (23%) were NMV-r users. Overall, 43 all-cause hospitalizations (5.9%) and 13 (1.8%) deaths were observed at 30 days. A composite outcome occurred in 47 (6.5%) individuals. At multivariate analysis, male sex [OR 3.785; p = 0.0021], age ≥ 75 [OR 2.647; p = 0.0124], moderate illness [OR 16.75; p < 0.001], and treatment discontinuation after medical decision [OR 8.148; p = 0.0123] remained independently associated with the composite outcome. CONCLUSIONS: No differences between the two antivirals were observed. In this real-life setting, the early use of both of the oral antivirals helped limit composite outcome at 30 days among subjects who were at high risk of disease progression.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Outpatients , COVID-19/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies
9.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277413, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118095

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the late COVID-19, many countries have faced various surges and peaks within the number of infected. Iran was one of the countries that faced many surges and peaks within these years and faced many inadequacies and shortages of resources and hospital beds. Hence the healthcare system started using in-hospital medication such as Remdesivir in outpatients to reduce the load of patients admitted to the hospital. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the reported signs, symptoms, and outcomes of COVID-infected hospitalized and out-patients receiving Remdesivir. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, 214 patients (121 outpatient and 93 hospitalized) with moderate levels of Covid infection between October 2021 and February 2022 were studied. Both groups were treated with 200mg of Remdesivir, followed by 100 mg daily intravenous injections for five days; signs and symptoms, such as pain, shortness of breath, cough, fever and etc., of patients at the initiation and the end of treatment were recorded. Moreover, the patients' blood oxygen saturation was assessed two to three times a day, and the mean of the recorded measures was considered as the daily oxygen saturation. The outpatient group had to visit the hospital daily for treatment and assessment. At the treatment's end, mortality rates, disease signs, and symptoms alleviations were compared between the groups. RESULTS: The outpatient and hospitalized group's mean age was 40.30 ± 12.25 and 37.70 ± 12.00 years, and 51.2% and 55.9% were males, respectively. There was no statistical difference between baseline and clinical characteristics in the outpatients and hospitalized groups. After adjusting for oxygen saturation at baseline and gender in the multivariable Cox regression analysis, the risk of death did not statistically differ between the hospitalized and outpatient group (hazard ratio: 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-2.50)) at the end of the study. CONCLUSION: Based on the results of this study, the outcome, signs, and symptoms of inpatient and outpatient Remdesivir treatment groups did not differ significantly. Hence in COVID-19 surges where we have limitations in admitting patients, outpatient Remdesivir treatment for those without any underlying diseases can be a proper management method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Female , COVID-19/drug therapy , Outpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , Inpatients , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 818, 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly effective in reducing hospitalization and mortality among early symptomatic COVID-19 patients in clinical trials and real-world data. While resistance to some mAbs has since emerged among new variants, characteristics associated with treatment failure of mAbs remain unknown. METHODS: This multicenter, observational cohort study included patients with COVID-19 who received mAb treatment between November 20, 2020, and December 9, 2021. We utilized electronic health records from a statewide health system plus state-level vaccine and mortality data. The primary outcome was mAb treatment failure, defined as hospitalization or death within 28 days of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test. RESULTS: COVID-19 mAb was administered to 7406 patients. Hospitalization within 28 days of positive SARS-CoV-2 test occurred in 258 (3.5%) of all patients who received mAb treatment. Ten patients (0.1%) died within 28 days, and all but one were hospitalized prior to death. Characteristics associated with treatment failure included having two or more comorbidities excluding obesity and immunocompromised status (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-5.56), lack of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination (OR 2.73, 95% CI 2.01-3.77), non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.20-3.82), obesity (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.36-2.34), one comorbidity (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.11-2.57), age ≥ 65 years (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.13-2.35), and male sex (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.21-2.02). Immunocompromised status (none, mild, or moderate/severe), pandemic phase, and type of mAb received were not associated with treatment failure (all p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidities, lack of prior SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, obesity, age ≥ 65 years, and male sex are associated with treatment failure of mAbs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Outpatients , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitalization , Obesity , Treatment Failure , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use
11.
J Clin Virol ; 157: 105300, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Viral conjunctivitis (pink eye) can be highly contagious and is of public health importance. There remains significant debate whether SARS-CoV-2 can present as a primary conjunctivitis. The aim of this study was to identify pathogens associated with outpatient infectious conjunctivitis during the COVID-19 Delta surge. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in the spring and summer months of 2021. 106 patients with acute conjunctivitis who presented to the Aravind Eye Center in Madurai, India were included. One anterior nasal swab and one conjunctival swab of each eye were obtained for each enrolled patient. Samples were subsequently processed for unbiased metagenomic RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq). Outcomes included clinical findings and codetection of other pathogens with SARS-CoV-2 in patients with conjunctivitis. RESULTS: Among the 13 patients identified with human coronavirus RNA fragments in their swabs, 6 patients had SARS-CoV-2 infection, 5 patients had coinfections of SARS-CoV-2 and human adenovirus (HAdV), 1 patient had a coinfection with human coronavirus OC43 and HAdV, and 1 patient had a coinfection of Vittaforma corneae and SARS-CoV-2. 30% had bilateral disease and symptoms on presentation. Petechial hemorrhage was noted in 33% of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. No patients with SARS-CoV-2 or SARS-CoV-2 and HAdV infections had subepithelial infiltrates on presentation. All patients denied systemic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Among the patients presented with conjunctivitis associated with human coronavirus infection, over 50% of the patients had co-infections with other circulating pathogens, suggesting the public-health importance of broad pathogen testing and surveillance in the outpatient conjunctivitis population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Conjunctivitis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Coinfection/epidemiology , Outpatients , Prospective Studies , India/epidemiology , RNA
12.
N Engl J Med ; 387(10): 955, 2022 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106611
13.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 34(10): 2585-2590, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104161

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroids lower mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia requiring oxygen support. In this observational retrospective study (September 2020-June 2021), we explored the association between receiving home corticosteroids without oxygen supply and 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Among a total of 794 COVID-19 pneumonia patients, 763 were included into the study (males 68%; mean age 65 ±12 years), of whom 197 (26%) received home corticosteroids (mean daily prednisone equivalent-dose 40 mg ± 12 mg; range 10-50 mg; median 50 mg; IQR 25-50 mg; for 4 days). The overall 30-day mortality of the study population was 12%. The risk of death-adjusted for age, comorbidities, administration of remdesivir and respiratory failure severity-was lower (HR 0.405; p = 0.024) in patients receiving home corticosteroids. After stratifying the study population by age categories, home corticosteroids were associated with an adjusted decrease in mortality risk in patients > 77 years (HR 0.346; p = 0.040). Home corticosteroids may lower the 30-day mortality in elderly COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Outpatients , Retrospective Studies , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Oxygen , Steroids
14.
Viruses ; 14(11)2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099861

ABSTRACT

Elevated D-dimer plasma concentrations are common in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and are often associated with a worse prognosis, but it is not yet clear whether this also applies to outpatient cases. The present cross-sectional study evaluated D-dimer levels and their association with clinical parameters and inflammation biomarkers after a COVID-19 disease in individuals treated as outpatients. The study included 411 individuals (43.3% men) with an average age of 46.8 years (SD 15.2). Study participants who had acute COVID-19 disease at a median of 235 days (120; 323) ago were examined at the University Hospital Augsburg, Southern Germany, between 11/2020 and 05/2021. Plasma D-dimers were measured by a particle-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay. Sixty-one subjects (15%) showed increased D-dimer concentrations (≥500 µg/L). Study participants with elevated D-dimer levels in comparison to subjects with levels in the reference range were significantly older, and more frequently reported a history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, venous thromboembolism, and chronic venous insufficiency. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, CRP levels (OR 5.58 per mg/dL, 95% CI 1.77-17.60) and white blood cell count (OR 1.48 per nL, 95% CI 1.19-1.83) were significantly related to elevated D-dimers even after adjustment for multiple testing. However, acute or persistent symptoms were not significantly associated with increased D-dimers. Elevated D-dimer levels months after an acute COVID-19 disease seems to be associated with markers of inflammation. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and consequences of prolonged D-dimer elevation in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Female , Outpatients , Cross-Sectional Studies , Biomarkers , Inflammation
15.
Orthopade ; 51(5): 385-394, 2022 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798515

ABSTRACT

No appeal by a health politician, no matter how insistent, has ever forced all the operational structures of our health-care system to examine their own efficiencies and cost reduction potentials as has SARS-CoV­2. Fast-track surgery, developed long before the current pandemic, can become an indispensable element of modern hospital routines through the integration of interlocked care structures. Patient satisfaction and clinical outcome can be improved by significantly shortening hospital stays, decreasing complication rates, and by additionally strengthening the competence and motivation of the patients involved. Hospital staff could be relieved of heavy workloads, and overall costs could be reduced by involving external prehabilitation centers. It is now necessary to further develop standards for the establishment and implementation of appropriately coordinated prehabilitation and rehabilitation concepts for elective total hip and knee replacement surgery and, ideally, to save resources at the same time through regional networking and integration.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Ambulatory Care , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/rehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Outpatients , Preoperative Exercise , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276982, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with far-reaching changes all over the world. Health care systems were and are also affected. Little is known about the impact of these changes and the duration of the pandemic on people with mental disorders. The aim of this longitudinal follow-up study was to investigate the mental health status, medical care provision, and attitudes towards the pandemic of these people at the end of the second pandemic lockdown in Germany in 2021, and to compare these findings with the results of 2020. METHODS: People with mental disorders currently receiving treatment in the psychiatric outpatient department of the University Hospital Leipzig, Germany, were asked about depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), self-reported medical care provision, attitudes and social and emotional aspects of the pandemic (social support [ESSI], perceived stress [PSS-4], loneliness [UCLA-3-LS], and resilience [BRS]) using structured telephone interviews. RESULTS: In total, N = 75 participants who had already participated in the first survey in 2020 took part in the follow-up telephone interviews. The most frequent clinician-rated diagnoses were attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 21; 28.0%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 16; 21.3%). In comparison to 2020, a significantly higher proportion of participants reported no problems in receiving medical care provision. Compared to the previous year, the resilience of the participants had significantly decreased. Depressive symptoms, social support, perceived stress, and loneliness remained stable. Significantly more participants felt restricted by the pandemic-related government measures in 2021 than in 2020. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the importance for continued efforts to maintain stable medical care provision for people with mental disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic, as except for a decrease in resilience, mental health status remained stable. Nonetheless there is still a need for continued treatment to stabilise and improve this status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Outpatients , Follow-Up Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Qualitative Research , Telephone
17.
Trials ; 23(1): 273, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a heterogeneous outcome in individuals from remaining asymptomatic to death. In a majority of cases, mild symptoms are present that do not require hospitalization and can be successfully treated in the outpatient setting, though symptoms may persist for a long duration. We hypothesize that drugs suitable for decentralized study in outpatients will have efficacy among infected outpatients METHODS: The TREAT NOW platform is designed to accommodate testing multiple agents with the ability to incorporate new agents in the future. TREAT NOW is an adaptive, blinded, multi-center, placebo-controlled superiority randomized clinical trial which started with two active therapies (hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir) and placebo, with the hydroxychloroquine arm dropped shortly after enrollment began due to external evidence. Each arm has a target enrollment of 300 participants who will be randomly assigned in an equal allocation to receive either an active therapy or placebo twice daily for 14 days with daily electronic surveys collected over days 1 through 16 and on day 29 to evaluate symptoms and a modified COVID-19 ordinal outcome scale. Participants are enrolled remotely by telephone and consented with a digital interface, study drug is overnight mailed to study participants, and data collection occurs electronically without in-person interactions. DISCUSSION: If effective treatments for COVID-19 can be identified for individuals in the outpatient setting before they advance to severe disease, it will prevent progression to more severe disease, reduce the need for hospitalization, and shorten the duration of symptoms. The novel decentralized, "no touch" approach used by the TREAT NOW platform has distinction advantages over traditional in-person trials to reach broader populations and perform study procedures in a pragmatic yet rigorous manner. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04372628. Registered on April 30, 2020. First posted on May 4, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Outpatients , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
18.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221134560, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As of July 2022, there have been more than 91.3 million cases of COVID-19 and nearly 1.03 million deaths in the United States alone. In addition, many people who survived COVID-19 had long-term symptoms, such as fatigue, dyspnea, loss of smell and taste, depression, and anxiety. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the status of COVID-19 patients who were previously hospitalized. METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and its affiliated University Medical Center under IRB of L21-144. We included all patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and followed up in our Internal Medicine Clinic at any time between April 1, 2020, and April 1, 2021, and reviewed follow-up data for these patients after discharge. RESULTS: A total of 128 patients were included; 59 (46%) were men, and 69 (54%) were women with an average age of 59.7 ± 14.8 years. Most of the patients (n = 78, 60.9%) identified their race as Hispanic or Latino origin; the next largest group was Caucasian (n = 29, 22.65%). The average number of days until post-hospitalization follow-up was 36 ± 38 days. The 50% of the patients (n = 64) used telemedicine for follow-up visits. Important comorbidities in these patients included diabetes (n = 84, 65.6%) and hypertension (n = 94, 73.4%). Thirty-four patients (26.6%) reported respiratory symptoms at their follow-up appointments, 24 patients (18.8%) reported constitutional symptoms, 12 patients (9.4%) reported GI symptoms, and 25 patients (19.5%) reported other symptoms, such as paresthesia, lower extremity edema, or psychological symptoms. After hospital discharge, 54 patients had follow-up chest x-rays, and 41 (75.9%) still had abnormal findings consistent with COVID-19 imaging characteristics. Follow-up laboratory tests identified 44 patients (77.2%, 57 tested) with elevated D-dimer levels, 44 patients (78.6%, 56 tested) with high ferritin levels, and 21patients (35.6%, 59 tested) with elevated troponin T HS levels. CONCLUSION: Long-lasting COVID-19 symptoms in these patients included respiratory symptoms (26.6%), constitutional symptoms (18.8%), GI symptoms (9.4%), and other symptoms, such as paresthesia, lower extremity edema, or psychological symptoms (19.5%). The rate of telehealth follow-up was 50%. Many patients had elevated inflammatory markers that will need follow up to determine the clinical implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Male , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Outpatients , Retrospective Studies , Paresthesia , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization , Hospitals
19.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 132-139, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a shift globally from face-to-face consultations to remote consultations. In our department, remote consultations have taken in the form of telephone consultations. In this paper, we set out to study a group of Irish psychiatrists' experience of these consultations. METHODS: We identified recurrent themes in the existing literature on doctors' experience of telephone consultations with a view to determining the applicability of these themes to a group of Irish psychiatrists. A questionnaire was developed based on themes in the literature. This was sent to all psychiatrists working in a busy psychiatric service in Dublin. RESULTS: The questionnaire response rate was 72% (n = 26/35). Diagnostic challenges, the effect of phone consultation on the therapeutic alliance, challenges associated with the use of technology and ethical concerns were identified as issues. Flexibility in the working day and convenience were identified as possible benefits to telephone consultations. CONCLUSIONS: The group that participated in this research study identified a number of challenges to carrying out successful phone consultations. This study highlights the need at our clinical site for interventions to address the issues identified by staff. The findings also highlight the requirement for larger studies with stronger methodologies to determine the generalisability of our results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Remote Consultation , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
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