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1.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthy eating and physical activity are effective non-pharmacological approaches to boost immune function and contain the pandemic. We aimed to explore the associations and interactions between physical activity and healthy eating behavior with COVID-19-like symptoms (Slike-CV19S). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3947 outpatients, from 14 February to 2 March 2020, at nine health facilities in Vietnam. Data collection included sociodemographic characteristics, healthy eating behavior (using the healthy eating score (HES) questionnaire), physical activity (using the short form international physical activity questionnaire), and Slike-CV19S. The associations and interactions were tested using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Frequent intake of fruits (OR = 0.84; p = 0.016), vegetables (OR = 0.72; p = 0.036), and fish (OR = 0.43; p < 0.001) were associated with a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared with infrequent intake. Patients with higher HES levels (OR = 0.84; p = 0.033 for medium HES; OR = 0.77; p = 0.006 for high HES) or being physically active (OR = 0.69; p < 0.001) had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES or physical inactivity, respectively. Patients with medium HES who were physically active (OR = 0.69; p = 0.005), or with high HES and physically active (OR = 0.58; p < 0.001), had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES and physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy eating behavior and physical activity showed single and combinative impacts on protecting people from Slike-CV19S. Strategic approaches are encouraged to improve healthy behaviors, which may further contribute to containing the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vietnam , Young Adult
2.
Am J Addict ; 30(5): 445-452, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The rapid scale-up of telehealth services for substance use disorders (SUDs) during the COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique opportunity to investigate patient experiences with telehealth. This study examined patient perceptions of telehealth in an outpatient SUD treatment program offering individual therapy, group therapy, and medication management. METHODS: Two hundred and seventy adults receiving SUD outpatient treatment were eligible to complete a 23-item online survey distributed by clinicians; 58 patients completed/partially completed the survey. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Participants were predominately male, White, and well-educated. The majority (86.2%) were "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the quality of telehealth care. "Very satisfied" ratings were highest for individual therapy (90%), followed by medication management (75%) and group therapy (58%). Top reasons for liking telehealth included the ability to do it from home (90%) and not needing to spend time commuting (83%). Top reasons for disliking telehealth were not connecting as well with other members in group therapy (28%) and the ability for telehealth to be interrupted at home or work (26%). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth visits were a satisfactory treatment modality for most respondents receiving outpatient SUD care, especially those engaging in individual therapy. Challenges remain for telehealth group therapy. SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study examining patients' perceptions of telehealth for outpatient SUD treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic by treatment service type. Importantly, while many participants found telehealth more accessible than in-person treatment, there was variability with respect to the preferred mode of treatment delivery.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Outpatients , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Substance-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , Adult , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Psychotherapy, Group , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
3.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0251708, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease which is a major public health problem worldwide. Given the serious threats imposed by COVID-19 and the absence of vaccines until August 2020, preventive measures play an essential role in reducing infection rates and controlling its spread. This shows the necessity of public adherence for preventive and control measures, which is affected by their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) towards COVID-19 and associated factors among outpatient service visitors, Debre Markos compressive specialized hospital, north-west,Ethiopia. METHOD: Institutional-based cross-sectional study design with a systematic random sampling technique was conducted from July to August 2020. Among a total of 404 participants, 398 were recruited. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The data was edited, coded, and entered into Epi data version 4.6 and exported to SPSS-25 for analysis. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression models were employed to identify factors associated with KAP. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULT: The prevalence of poor knowledge, attitude and practice among the outpatient service visitors were 27.1%, 30.7% and 44%, respectively. The mean age of the participants was 33.4 ±10.9 years. Variables like; educational status, ''can't read and write" [AOR = 3.76, 95% CI (1.36-10.42), P = 0.01], read and write [AOR = 5.90, 95% CI (2.39-14.98), P = 0.01], rural residence [AOR = 3.04, 95% CI (1.43-6.46), P = 0.01] and having no television [AOR = 0.8, 95% CI (0.79-0.89), P = 0.03] were significantly associated with poor knowledge. While, educational status of "can't read and write", [AOR = 6.71, 95% CI (2.78-16.16), P = 0.01] and rural residence [AOR = 2.03, 95% CI (1.14-3.61), P = 0.02] were significantly associated with poor attitude. Additionally, poor knowledge, [AOR = 22.73, 95% CI (10.5-49.21), P = 0.01], rural residence [AOR = 2.08, 95% CI (1.08-4.88), P = 0.04] and having no television [AOR = 2.24, 95% CI (1.05-4.79), P = 0.01] were significantly associated with poor practice. CONCLUSION: In this study, knowledge, attitude, and practice among outpatient service visitors was poor which needs targeted health education and interventions from the health professional to enhance their knowledge, attitude, and practice towards COVID-19. In parallel with this, special attention should be given for the rural community and for those with an educational status of can't read and write.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Outpatients/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Educational Status , Ethiopia , Female , Humans , Income , Male , Mass Screening/psychology , Middle Aged , Quarantine/psychology , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data
4.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 634904, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282431

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We explored the association of underlying health conditions (UHC) with depression and anxiety, and examined the modification effects of suspected COVID-19 symptoms (S-COVID-19-S), health-related behaviors (HB), and preventive behaviors (PB). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8,291 outpatients aged 18-85 years, in 18 hospitals and health centers across Vietnam from 14th February to May 31, 2020. We collected the data regarding participant's characteristics, UHC, HB, PB, depression, and anxiety. Results: People with UHC had higher odds of depression (OR = 2.11; p < 0.001) and anxiety (OR = 2.86; p < 0.001) than those without UHC. The odds of depression and anxiety were significantly higher for those with UHC and S-COVID-19-S (p < 0.001); and were significantly lower for those had UHC and interacted with "unchanged/more" physical activity (p < 0.001), or "unchanged/more" drinking (p < 0.001 for only anxiety), or "unchanged/healthier" eating (p < 0.001), and high PB score (p < 0.001), as compared to those without UHC and without S-COVID-19-S, "never/stopped/less" physical activity, drinking, "less healthy" eating, and low PB score, respectively. Conclusion: S-COVID-19-S worsen psychological health in patients with UHC. Physical activity, drinking, healthier eating, and high PB score were protective factors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Depression , Outpatients , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Vietnam/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Nature ; 594(7862): 259-264, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275936

ABSTRACT

The acute clinical manifestations of COVID-19 have been well characterized1,2, but the post-acute sequelae of this disease have not been comprehensively described. Here we use the national healthcare databases of the US Department of Veterans Affairs to systematically and comprehensively identify 6-month incident sequelae-including diagnoses, medication use and laboratory abnormalities-in patients with COVID-19 who survived for at least 30 days after diagnosis. We show that beyond the first 30 days of illness, people with COVID-19 exhibit a higher risk of death and use of health resources. Our high-dimensional approach identifies incident sequelae in the respiratory system, as well as several other sequelae that include nervous system and neurocognitive disorders, mental health disorders, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, malaise, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain and anaemia. We show increased incident use of several therapeutic agents-including pain medications (opioids and non-opioids) as well as antidepressant, anxiolytic, antihypertensive and oral hypoglycaemic agents-as well as evidence of laboratory abnormalities in several organ systems. Our analysis of an array of prespecified outcomes reveals a risk gradient that increases according to the severity of the acute COVID-19 infection (that is, whether patients were not hospitalized, hospitalized or admitted to intensive care). Our findings show that a substantial burden of health loss that spans pulmonary and several extrapulmonary organ systems is experienced by patients who survive after the acute phase of COVID-19. These results will help to inform health system planning and the development of multidisciplinary care strategies to reduce chronic health loss among individuals with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Databases, Factual , Datasets as Topic , Electronic Health Records , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/physiopathology , Male , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Risk , Time Factors , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
7.
Int Rev Psychiatry ; 33(4): 394-403, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165120

ABSTRACT

The following case series provides several examples from the Digital Clinic, an outpatient mental health program which uses smartphone technology to augment traditional mental health care. The themes highlighted in this piece, expanding emotional-awareness, symptom tracking, and medication management, provide real-clinical examples of how the Digital Clinic offered remote mental health care to a diverse group of people. Furthermore, the following piece demonstrates to practicing clinicians how digital technologies, like smartphone apps, can diversify methods of clinical engagement, assist with collecting health metrics in a safe and ethical manner, and promote person centred care. With the COVID-19 pandemic forcing re-evaluation of how mental health services are provided, it is critical to ensure that digitally infused systems of care, like the Digital Clinic, are effective, accessible, and scalable.


Subject(s)
Internet-Based Intervention , Mental Health Services/supply & distribution , Mobile Applications , Patient-Centered Care , Smartphone , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Outpatients/psychology
8.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 125: 108303, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078047

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare over ten weeks the number of relapses, hospital admissions, calls made, admissions to therapeutic communities, face-to-face visits, treatment adjustment, number of injectables administered, and number of emergencies attended due to emotional and behavioral alterations and/or substance use disorder, and to describe and quantify social emergencies in an outpatient drug clinic (ODC) in Salamanca (Spain) from March 16, 2020, to May 22, 2020. METHODS: This is an ecological study of the COVID pandemic over ten weeks. The study examines the set of alcohol or other drug-dependent or dual disorder patients in the population of Salamanca, Spain. The measurements were: professionals; calls made; percentage of successful calls; face-to-face visits; first visits made; reviews made; techniques; injectable treatments; other treatments; evolution; relapses. The ODC includes about 375 new patients each year and another 650 other patients annually. RESULTS: The study found the number of relapses to be greater in the last five weeks of the 10-week study period. Patients' psychopathological instability also increased, and face-to-face visits were necessary. The most frequent psychopathology that required face-to-face intervention was depressive disorder. The number of interventions with patients increased. In parallel, social workers' efforts were greater after the seventh week. There was a decrease in response to calls. Throughout this time, the ODC attended to patients who needed to be treated for the first time. CONCLUSIONS: Confinement due to the coronavirus pandemic generated maladaptive emotional responses and other behaviors, such as excessive alcohol consumption. The number of face-to-face consultations, admissions, and referrals to therapeutic communities increased. Patients under stress and in social isolation resorted more often to substance use. The ODC had to adopt a flexible approach to evaluate patients with more serious problems, by using face-to-face assessments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Outpatients/psychology , Substance Abuse Treatment Centers , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Psychopathology , Spain/epidemiology
9.
Psychiatr Serv ; 71(11): 1143-1150, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067006

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many psychiatrists have rapidly transitioned to telemedicine. This qualitative study sought to understand how this dramatic change in delivery has affected mental health care, including modes of telemedicine psychiatrists used, barriers encountered, and future plans. The aim was to inform the ongoing COVID-19 response and pass on lessons learned to psychiatrists who are starting to offer telemedicine. METHODS: From March 31 to April 9, 2020, semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 outpatient psychiatrists practicing in five U.S. states with significant early COVID-19 activity. Inductive and deductive approaches were used to develop interview summaries, and a matrix analysis was conducted to identify and refine themes. RESULTS: At the time of the interviews, all 20 psychiatrists had been using telemedicine for 2-4 weeks. Telemedicine encompassed video visits, phone visits, or both. Although many continued to prefer in-person care and planned to return to it after the pandemic, psychiatrists largely perceived the transition positively. However, several noted challenges affecting the quality of provider-patient interactions, such as decreased clinical data for assessment, diminished patient privacy, and increased distractions in the patient's home setting. Several psychiatrists noted that their disadvantaged patients lacked reliable access to a smartphone, computer, or the Internet. Participants identified several strategies that helped them improve telemedicine visit quality. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has driven a dramatic shift in how psychiatrists deliver care. Findings highlight that although psychiatrists expressed some concerns about the quality of these encounters, the transition has been largely positive for both patients and physicians.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Psychiatry/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , United States
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(11): e19574, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After the COVID-19 outbreak, the Italian Government stopped most regular health care activity. As a result, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) had limited access to outpatient clinics and hospitals. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyze the perception of the COVID-19 emergency among patients with IBD during the early weeks of the lockdown. METHODS: We invited adult patients with IBD from the University of Salerno (Campania, South Italy) and the University of Padua (Veneto, North Italy) by email to answer an ad hoc anonymous survey about COVID-19. We also collected data on demographic and disease characteristics. RESULTS: In total, 167 patients with IBD from Padua and 83 patients from Salerno answered the survey (age: mean 39.7 years, SD 13.9 years; female: n=116, 46.4%). We found that patients with IBD were particularly worried about the COVID-19 pandemic (enough: 77/250, 30.8%; much/very much: 140/250, 56.0%), as they felt more vulnerable to COVID-19 due to their condition (enough: 70/250, 28.0%; much/very much: 109/250, 43.6%). Patients with IBD from the red zone of Veneto were more worried than patients from Campania (P=.001), and men felt more susceptible to the virus than women (P=.05). Additionally, remote medicine was appreciated more by younger patients than older patients (P=.04). CONCLUSIONS: The results of our survey demonstrate that the lockdown had a significant impact on the psychological aspects of patients with IBD and suggest the need for increasing communication with patients with IBD (eg, through telemedicine) to ensure patients receive adequate health care, correct information, and proper psychological support.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/psychology , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male
13.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 99(11): 977-981, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721040

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic transformed health care delivery, including rapid expansion of telehealth. Telerehabilitation, defined as therapy provided by physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech and language pathology, was rapidly adopted with goals to provide access to care and limit contagion. The purpose of this brief report was to describe the feasibility of and satisfaction with telerehabilitation. A total of 205 participants completed online surveys after a telerehabilitation visit. Most commonly, participants were women (53.7%), 35-64 yrs old, and completed physical therapy (53.7%) for established visits of 30-44 mins in duration for primary impairments in sports, lower limb injuries, and pediatric neurology. Overall, high ratings ("excellent" or "very good" responses) were observed for all patient-centered outcome metrics (range, 93.7%-99%) and value in future telehealth visit (86.8%) across telerehabilitation visits. Women participated more frequently and provided higher ratings than male participants did. Other benefits included eliminating travel time, incorporating other health care advocates, and convenience delivering care in familiar environment to pediatric patients. Technology and elements of hands-on aspects of care were observed limitations. Recognizing reduced indirect costs of care that telerehabilitation may provide along with high patient satisfaction are reasons policy makers should adopt these services into future health care delivery models.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Occupational Therapy/psychology , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Therapy Modalities/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Speech Therapy/psychology , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(11): 2027-2032, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709325

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the feasibility and acceptability of telemedicine as a substitute for outpatient services in emergency situations such as the sudden surge of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. DESIGN: Observational cohort study with historical control. SETTING: Tertiary referral outpatient institute. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive services provided to patients with spinal disorders (N=1207). INTERVENTIONS: Telemedicine services included teleconsultations and telephysiotherapy, and lasted as long as usual interventions. They were delivered using free teleconference apps, caregivers were actively involved, and interviews and counseling were performed as usual. Teleconsultations included standard, but adapted, measurements and evaluations by video and from photographs and videos sent in advance according to specific tutorials. During telephysiotherapy, new sets of exercises were defined and recorded as usual. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We compared the number of services provided in 3 phases, including corresponding periods in 2018 and 2019. During the control (30 working d) and COVID-19 surge (13d) only usual consultations and physiotherapy were provided; during the telemed phase (15d), only teleconsultations and telephysiotherapy were provided. If a reliable medical decision was not possible during teleconsultations, usual face-to-face interventions were prescribed. Continuous quality improvement questionnaires were also evaluated. RESULTS: During telemed, 325 teleconsulations and 882 telephysiotherapy sessions were provided in 15 days. We found a rapid decrease (-39%) of outpatient services from the control to the COVID-19 phase (R2=0.85), which partially recovered in the telemed phase for telephysiotherapy (from -37% to -21%; P<.05) and stabilized for teleconsultation (from -55% to -60%) interventions. Usual face-to-face interventions were required for 0.5% of patients. Patients' satisfaction with telemedicine was very high (2.8 out of 3). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is feasible and allows medical professionals to continue providing outpatient services with a high level of patient satisfaction. During the current pandemic, this experience can provide a viable alternative for many outpatient services while reducing the need for travel and face-to-face contact to a minimum.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/psychology , COVID-19 , Outpatients/psychology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Rehabilitation/psychology , Spinal Diseases/rehabilitation , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Ambulatory Care/methods , Cohort Studies , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation , Rehabilitation/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Diseases/psychology
15.
Psychiatry Res ; 292: 113317, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-663626

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 throughout Italy, particularly Lombardy, led to adopt quarantine measures, known to exacerbate pre-existing psychiatric conditions. We described a telephone-based surveillance on 101 euthymic Mood Disorder outpatients in Milan by a non-standardized survey to evaluate reactions to lockdown measures and the presence of quarantine stressors. Frustration was the most represented quarantine stressor. Being jobless was significantly related to the presence of frustration, somatization, increased alertness, psychic anxiety and low mood; younger age to the presence of psychic anxiety, alertness and financial concerns. No recurrences were observed at the time of writing.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Outpatients/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Population Surveillance/methods , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
18.
Psychiatr Serv ; 71(7): 749-752, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401824

ABSTRACT

In anticipation of a surge of COVID-19 cases in Northern California, the outpatient psychiatric clinic at UC Davis Health, in which 98% of visits initially occurred in person, was converted to a telepsychiatry clinic, with all visits changed to virtual appointments within 3 business days. The clinic had 73 virtual appointments on its first day after full conversion. This column describes the process, challenges, and lessons learned from this rapid conversion. Patients were generally grateful, providers learned rapidly how to work from home, and the clinic remained financially viable with no immediate losses.


Subject(s)
Change Management , Coronavirus Infections , Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , California/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Satisfaction , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
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