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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28884, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713780

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study analyzed the changes in the number of outpatients and disease presentation during the entirety of 2020, the period of COVID-19 pandemic.The average annual number of outpatient visits between 2017 and 2019 (before COVID-19) and the total number of outpatient visits in 2020 (COVID-19 period) were compared. Diagnostic codes were identified during 2 periods to analyze changes in the number of outpatient visits according to disease and month.The average annual number of outpatient visits was 47,105 before, and 40,786 during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a decrease of 13.4%. The number of outpatient visits in internal medicine decreased by 10.2% during the COVID-19 pandemic and tended to rebound during the second half of the year. However, the number of outpatient visits in the pediatric department decreased by 37.5% overall throughout the COVID-19 period and continued to decline in the second half of the year. The number of outpatients with infectious diseases decreased significantly (35.9%) compared to noninfectious diseases (cancer, 5.0%; circulatory disease, 4.1%). In addition, the number of outpatient visits due to viral diseases continued to decline, while the incidence of bacterial diseases increased rapidly in the second half of the year.This study confirmed that the number of outpatient visits due to bacterial or viral infections decreased throughout the COVID-19 crisis. Therefore, expanding public health and telemedicine services is necessary to prevent secondary health problems caused by essential medical use restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internal Medicine/organization & administration , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Internal Medicine/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatrics/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
2.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0155021, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685499

ABSTRACT

Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common pathogen causing respiratory disease in children. We sought to investigate the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae among outpatient children with mild respiratory tract infections (RTIs) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Eligible patients were prospectively enrolled from January 2020 to June 2021. Throat swabs were tested for M. pneumoniae RNA. M. pneumoniae IgM was tested by a colloidal gold assay. Macrolide resistance and the effect of the COVID-19 countermeasures on M. pneumoniae prevalence were assessed. Symptom scores, treatments, and outcomes were evaluated. Eight hundred sixty-two eligible children at 15 centers in China were enrolled. M. pneumoniae was detected in 78 (9.0%) patients. Seasonally, M. pneumoniae peaked in the first spring and dropped dramatically to extremely low levels over time until the next summer. Decreases in COVID-19 prevalence were significantly associated with decreases in M. pneumoniae prevalence (r = 0.76, P = 0.001). The macrolide resistance rate was 7.7%. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the colloidal gold assay used in determining M. pneumoniae infection were 32.1% and 77.9%, respectively. No more benefits for improving the severity of symptoms and outcomes were observed in M. pneumoniae-infected patients treated with a macrolide than in those not treated with a macrolide during follow-up. The prevalences of M. pneumoniae and macrolide resistance in outpatient children with mild RTIs were at low levels in the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic but may have rebounded recently. The colloidal gold assay for M. pneumoniae IgM may be not appropriate for diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection. Macrolides should be used with caution among outpatients with mild RTIs. IMPORTANCE This is the first and largest prospective, multicenter, active, population-based surveillance study of the epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae among outpatient children with mild respiratory tract infections (RTIs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nationwide measures like strict face mask wearing and restrictions on population movement implemented to prevent the spread of COVID-19 might also effectively prevent the spread of M. pneumoniae. The prevalence of M. pneumoniae and the proportion of drug-resistant M. pneumoniae isolates in outpatient children with mild RTIs were at low levels in the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic but may have rebounded recently. The colloidal gold assay for M. pneumoniae IgM may be not appropriate for screening and diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection. Macrolides should be used with caution among outpatients with mild RTIs.


Subject(s)
Mycoplasma pneumoniae/isolation & purification , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Female , Humans , Infant , Macrolides/therapeutic use , Male , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/genetics , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/physiology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(12): 1461-1465, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639432

ABSTRACT

Objective: During the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, telemedicine has been brought to the forefront of attention. This report aimed to assess psychiatric comorbidities in COVID-19 patients by utilizing telepsychiatry. Methods: COVID-19 patients admitted in Fasa University Hospital and nonhospitalized outpatients of Fasa city were interviewed by a psychiatrist through video chat for a 1-month period (March-April, 2020). Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7), and Perceived Stress Scale-14 (PSS 14) questionnaires were administered for all patients. Each patient's mental status was recorded, and if any psychiatric problem was diagnosed, supportive psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and follow-up visits based on the patient's condition were started. Result: From a total of 82 COVID-19 patients who entered the study, 32 (39.03%) and 50 (60.97%) subjects were inpatients and outpatients, respectively. Moreover, 32 (39.03%) subjects were male and 50 (60.97%) were female. Insomnia seen in 24 (29.3%) patients and adjustment disorder in 13 (15.9%) patients were the most common psychiatric disorders among a total of 33 (40.2%) patients suffering from mental illness. Female and hospitalized patients presented significantly more frequent comorbidities than males and outpatients. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders were significantly more common in patients with hospital admission than those without and more frequent in female versus male subjects. There were no significant differences between male and female subjects with and without admission according to the PHQ-9, GAD-7, and PSS-14 scores. It was concluded that telepsychiatry in the early stages of mental problems during a catastrophic event like the coronavirus pandemic, can be an efficient instrument for the screening of psychosomatic comorbidities, so that pharmacological treatment (considering possible drug interactions with COVID-19 medications) and psychotherapeutic intervention can be optimized by psychiatrists.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Video Recording/statistics & numerical data
4.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E1134-E1140, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reports have suggested that anosmia is strongly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, but patients were often asked about this symptom after their diagnosis. This study assessed associations between prospectively reported anosmia and other symptoms related to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and SARS-CoV-2 positivity in community testing centres in Toronto, Ontario. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data were collected from 2 COVID-19 assessment centres affiliated with 2 hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, from Apr. 5 to Sept. 30, 2020. We included symptomatic profiles of all people who underwent a SARS-CoV-2 test at either clinic within the study period. We used generalized estimating equations to account for repeat visits and to assess associations between anosmia and other symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 positivity. RESULTS: A total of 83 443 SARS-CoV-2 tests were conducted across the 2 sites for 72 692 participants during the study period. Of all tests, 1640 (2.0%) were positive; 837 (51.0%) of people who tested positive were asymptomatic. The adjusted odds ratio for the association between anosmia and test positivity was 5.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.50-6.22), with sensitivity of 0.138 (95% CI 0.121-0.154), specificity of 0.980 (95% CI 0.979-0.981), a positive predictive value of 0.120 (95% CI 0.106-0.135) and a negative predictive value of 0.983 (95% CI 0.982-0.984). INTERPRETATION: Anosmia had high specificity and a positive predictive value of 12% for SARS-CoV-2 infection in this community population with low prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 positivity. The presence of anosmia should increase clinical suspicion of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and our findings suggest that people presenting with this symptom should be tested.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Young Adult
5.
JAMA Intern Med ; 182(1): 42-49, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527389

ABSTRACT

Importance: Systemic corticosteroids are commonly used in treating severe COVID-19. However, the role of inhaled corticosteroids in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate disease is less clear. Objective: To determine the efficacy of the inhaled steroid ciclesonide in reducing the time to alleviation of all COVID-19-related symptoms among nonhospitalized participants with symptomatic COVID-19 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted at 10 centers throughout the US and assessed the safety and efficacy of a ciclesonide metered-dose inhaler (MDI) for treating nonhospitalized participants with symptomatic COVID-19 infection who were screened from June 11, 2020, to November 3, 2020. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to receive ciclesonide MDI, 160 µg per actuation, for a total of 2 actuations twice a day (total daily dose, 640 µg) or placebo for 30 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was time to alleviation of all COVID-19-related symptoms (cough, dyspnea, chills, feeling feverish, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell) by day 30. Secondary end points included subsequent emergency department visits or hospital admissions for reasons attributable to COVID-19. Results: A total of 413 participants were screened and 400 (96.9%) were enrolled and randomized (197 [49.3%] in the ciclesonide arm and 203 [50.7%] in the placebo arm; mean [SD] age, 43.3 [16.9] years; 221 [55.3%] female; 2 [0.5%] Asian, 47 [11.8%] Black or African American, 3 [0.8%] Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, 345 [86.3%] White, and 1 multiracial individuals [0.3%]; 172 Hispanic or Latino individuals [43.0%]). The median time to alleviation of all COVID-19-related symptoms was 19.0 days (95% CI, 14.0-21.0) in the ciclesonide arm and 19.0 days (95% CI, 16.0-23.0) in the placebo arm. There was no difference in resolution of all symptoms by day 30 (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.84-1.97). Participants who were treated with ciclesonide had fewer subsequent emergency department visits or hospital admissions for reasons related to COVID-19 (odds ratio, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.85). No participants died during the study. Conclusions and Relevance: The results of this randomized clinical trial demonstrated that ciclesonide did not achieve the primary efficacy end point of reduced time to alleviation of all COVID-19-related symptoms. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04377711.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Pregnenediones/standards , Administration, Inhalation , Adolescent , Adult , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Glucocorticoids/standards , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Metered Dose Inhalers , Middle Aged , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pregnenediones/therapeutic use
8.
Am Surg ; 87(10): 1656-1660, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480321

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Initial reports of significantly worse outcomes for cancer patients with COVID-19 led to guidelines for triaging surgical cancer treatment. We sought to evaluate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on oncologic surgical specialty referrals. METHODS: We compared referrals to oncologic surgical specialty clinics at an academic tertiary care institution following implementation of stay-at-home orders in California (3/19/20-7/31/20, "COVID") to the same time period the year prior (3/19/19-7/31/19, "Pre-COVID"). The number of appointments, consulted surgical services, insurance types, acuity of diagnoses, and times from referral to first appointment (TRFA) were assessed. RESULTS: The overall number of patients seen in matched time periods decreased by 21.6% from 900 (pre-COVID) to 705 (COVID). Proportions of patients with malignant and suspicious diagnoses, surgical and thoracic oncology visits, and Medicaid insurance differed from comparison groups during the COVID period (P < .05). Overall median (interquartile range) TRFA decreased from 14 (20) to 12 (19) days (P = .001) during COVID. CONCLUSION: After implementation of stay-at-home orders, higher acuity and vulnerable patients were appropriately seen in oncologic surgical specialty clinics. While the long-term effects of decreased clinic visits during COVID remain uncertain, further examination of scheduling practices that led to shorter referral times may identify methods to improve timeliness of care and surgical oncologic outcomes in non-pandemic settings.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Triage
9.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438687

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D and zinc are important components of nutritional immunity. This study compared the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and zinc in COVID-19 outpatients with those of potentially non-infected participants. The association of clinical symptoms with vitamin D and zinc status was also examined. A checklist and laboratory examination were applied to collect data in a cross-sectional study conducted on 53 infected outpatients with COVID-19 and 53 potentially non-infected participants. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D were not significantly lower in patients with moderate illness (19 ± 12 ng/mL) than patients with asymptomatic or mild illness (29 ± 18 ng/mL), with a trend noted for a lower serum concentration of 25(OH)D in moderate than asymptomatic or mild illness patients (p = 0.054). Infected patients (101 ± 18 µg/dL) showed a lower serum concentration of zinc than potentially non-infected participants (114 ± 13 µg/dL) (p = 0.01). Patients with normal (odds ratio (OR), 0.19; p ≤ 0.001) and insufficient (OR, 0.3; p = 0.007) vitamin D status at the second to seventh days of disease had decreased OR of general symptoms compared to patients with vitamin D deficiency. This study revealed the importance of 25(OH)D measurement to predict the progression of general and pulmonary symptoms and showed that infected patients had significantly lower zinc concentrations than potentially non-infected participants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Zinc/blood , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Trace Elements/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamins/blood
10.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthy eating and physical activity are effective non-pharmacological approaches to boost immune function and contain the pandemic. We aimed to explore the associations and interactions between physical activity and healthy eating behavior with COVID-19-like symptoms (Slike-CV19S). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3947 outpatients, from 14 February to 2 March 2020, at nine health facilities in Vietnam. Data collection included sociodemographic characteristics, healthy eating behavior (using the healthy eating score (HES) questionnaire), physical activity (using the short form international physical activity questionnaire), and Slike-CV19S. The associations and interactions were tested using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Frequent intake of fruits (OR = 0.84; p = 0.016), vegetables (OR = 0.72; p = 0.036), and fish (OR = 0.43; p < 0.001) were associated with a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared with infrequent intake. Patients with higher HES levels (OR = 0.84; p = 0.033 for medium HES; OR = 0.77; p = 0.006 for high HES) or being physically active (OR = 0.69; p < 0.001) had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES or physical inactivity, respectively. Patients with medium HES who were physically active (OR = 0.69; p = 0.005), or with high HES and physically active (OR = 0.58; p < 0.001), had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES and physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy eating behavior and physical activity showed single and combinative impacts on protecting people from Slike-CV19S. Strategic approaches are encouraged to improve healthy behaviors, which may further contribute to containing the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vietnam , Young Adult
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 709861, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394760

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immune hyperactivity is an important contributing factor to the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 infection. Nasal administration of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody downregulates hyperactive immune responses in animal models of autoimmunity through its immunomodulatory properties. We performed a randomized pilot study of fully-human nasal anti-CD3 (Foralumab) in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 to determine if its immunomodulatory properties had ameliorating effects on disease. METHODS: Thirty-nine outpatients with mild to moderate COVID-19 were recruited at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Santos in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Patients were randomized to three cohorts: 1) Control, no Foralumab (n=16); 2) Nasal Foralumab (100ug/day) given for 10 consecutive days with 6 mg dexamethasone given on days 1-3 (n=11); and 3) Nasal Foralumab alone (100ug/day) given for 10 consecutive days (n=12). Patients continued standard of care medication. RESULTS: We observed reduction of serum IL-6 and C-reactive protein in Foralumab alone vs. untreated or Foralumab/Dexa treated patients. More rapid clearance of lung infiltrates as measured by chest CT was observed in Foralumab and Foralumab/Dexa treated subjects vs. those that did not receive Foralumab. Foralumab treatment was well-tolerated with no severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study suggests that nasal Foralumab is well tolerated and may be of benefit in treatment of immune hyperactivity and lung involvement in COVID-19 disease and that further studies are warranted.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pneumonia/therapy , Administration, Intranasal , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Interleukin-6/blood , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257018, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented emergency medical services (EMS) worldwide with the difficult task of identifying patients with COVID-19 and predicting the severity of their illness. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physiological respiratory parameters in pre-hospital patients with COVID-19 differed from those without COVID-19 and if they could be used to aid EMS personnel in the prediction of illness severity. METHODS: Patients with suspected COVID-19 were included by EMS personnel in Uppsala, Sweden. A portable respiratory monitor based on pneumotachography was used to sample the included patient's physiological respiratory parameters. A questionnaire with information about present symptoms and background data was completed. COVID-19 diagnoses and hospital admissions were gathered from the electronic medical record system. The physiological respiratory parameters of patients with and without COVID-19 were then analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis and logistic regression. RESULTS: Between May 2020 and January 2021, 95 patients were included, and their physiological respiratory parameters analyzed. Of these patients, 53 had COVID-19. Using adjusted logistic regression, the odds of having COVID-19 increased with respiratory rate (95% CI 1.000-1.118), tidal volume (95% CI 0.996-0.999) and negative inspiratory pressure (95% CI 1.017-1.152). Patients admitted to hospital had higher respiratory rates (p<0.001) and lower tidal volume (p = 0.010) compared to the patients who were not admitted. Using adjusted logistic regression, the odds of hospital admission increased with respiratory rate (95% CI 1.081-1.324), rapid shallow breathing index (95% CI 1.006-1.040) and dead space percentage of tidal volume (95% CI 1.027-1.159). CONCLUSION: Patients taking smaller, faster breaths with less pressure had higher odds of having COVID-19 in this study. Smaller, faster breaths and higher dead space percentage also increased the odds of hospital admission. Physiological respiratory parameters could be a useful tool in detecting COVID-19 and predicting hospital admissions, although more research is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sweden
13.
Am J Addict ; 30(5): 445-452, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The rapid scale-up of telehealth services for substance use disorders (SUDs) during the COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique opportunity to investigate patient experiences with telehealth. This study examined patient perceptions of telehealth in an outpatient SUD treatment program offering individual therapy, group therapy, and medication management. METHODS: Two hundred and seventy adults receiving SUD outpatient treatment were eligible to complete a 23-item online survey distributed by clinicians; 58 patients completed/partially completed the survey. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Participants were predominately male, White, and well-educated. The majority (86.2%) were "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the quality of telehealth care. "Very satisfied" ratings were highest for individual therapy (90%), followed by medication management (75%) and group therapy (58%). Top reasons for liking telehealth included the ability to do it from home (90%) and not needing to spend time commuting (83%). Top reasons for disliking telehealth were not connecting as well with other members in group therapy (28%) and the ability for telehealth to be interrupted at home or work (26%). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth visits were a satisfactory treatment modality for most respondents receiving outpatient SUD care, especially those engaging in individual therapy. Challenges remain for telehealth group therapy. SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study examining patients' perceptions of telehealth for outpatient SUD treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic by treatment service type. Importantly, while many participants found telehealth more accessible than in-person treatment, there was variability with respect to the preferred mode of treatment delivery.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Outpatients , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Substance-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , Adult , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Psychotherapy, Group , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
14.
Cancer Med ; 10(18): 6327-6335, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344970

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate the effects of COVID-19 on computed tomography (CT) imaging of cancer. METHODS: Cancer-related CTs performed at one academic hospital and three affiliated community hospitals in Massachusetts were retrospectively analyzed. Three periods of 2020 were considered as follows: pre-COVID-19 (1/5/20-3/14/20), COVID-19 peak (3/15/20-5/2/20), and post-COVID-19 peak (5/3/20-11/14/20). 15 March 2020 was the day a state of emergency was declared in MA; 3 May 2020 was the day our hospitals resumed to non-urgent imaging. The volumes were assessed by (1) Imaging indication: cancer screening, initial workup, active cancer, and surveillance; (2) Care setting: outpatient and inpatient, ED; (3) Hospital type: quaternary academic center (QAC), university-affiliated community hospital (UACH), and sole community hospitals (SCHs). RESULTS: During the COVID-19 peak, a significant drop in CT volumes was observed (-42.2%, p < 0.0001), with cancer screening, initial workup, active cancer, and cancer surveillance declining by 81.7%, 54.8%, 30.7%, and 44.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In the post-COVID-19 peak period, cancer screening and initial workup CTs did not recover (-11.7%, p = 0.037; -20.0%, p = 0.031), especially in the outpatient setting. CT volumes for active cancer recovered, but inconsistently across hospital types: the QAC experienced a 9.4% decline (p = 0.022) and the UACH a 41.5% increase (p < 0.001). Outpatient CTs recovered after the COVID-19 peak, but with a shift in utilization away from the QAC (-8.7%, p = 0.020) toward the UACH (+13.3%, p = 0.013). Inpatient and ED-based oncologic CTs increased post-peak (+20.0%, p = 0.004 and +33.2%, p = 0.009, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cancer imaging was severely impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic. CTs for cancer screening and initial workup did not recover to pre-COVID-19 levels well into 2020, a finding that suggests more patients with advanced cancers may present in the future. A redistribution of imaging utilization away from the QAC and outpatient settings, toward the community hospitals and inpatient setting/ED was observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
15.
Am J Cardiol ; 153: 125-128, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293528

ABSTRACT

Mobile electrocardiogram (mECG) devices are being used increasingly, supplying recordings to providers and providing automatic rhythm interpretation. Given the intermittent nature of certain cardiac arrhythmias, mECGs allow instant access to a recording device. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, efforts to limit in-person patient interactions and avoid overwhelming emergency and inpatient services would add value. Our goal was to evaluate whether a mECG device would reduce healthcare utilization overall, particularly those of urgent nature. We identified a cohort of KardiaMobile (AliveCor, USA) mECG users and compared their healthcare utilization 1 year prior to obtaining the device and 1 year after. One hundred and twenty-eight patients were studied (mean age 64, 47% female). Mean duration of follow-up pre-intervention was 9.8 months. One hundred and twenty-three of 128 individuals completed post-intervention follow-up. Patients were less likely to have cardiac monitors ordered (30 vs 6; p <0.01), outpatient office visits (525 vs 382; p <0.01), cardiac-specific ED visits (51 vs 30; p <0.01), arrhythmia related ED visits (45 vs 20; p <0.01), and unplanned arrhythmia admissions (34 vs 11; p <0.01) in the year after obtaining a KardiaMobile device compared to the year prior to obtaining the device. Mobile technology is available for heart rhythm monitoring and can give feedback to the user. This study showed a reduction of in-person, healthcare utilization with mECG device use. In conclusion, this strategy would be expected to decrease the risk of exposure to patients and providers and would avoid overwhelming emergency and inpatient services.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/statistics & numerical data , Electrocardiography/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
16.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 634904, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282431

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We explored the association of underlying health conditions (UHC) with depression and anxiety, and examined the modification effects of suspected COVID-19 symptoms (S-COVID-19-S), health-related behaviors (HB), and preventive behaviors (PB). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8,291 outpatients aged 18-85 years, in 18 hospitals and health centers across Vietnam from 14th February to May 31, 2020. We collected the data regarding participant's characteristics, UHC, HB, PB, depression, and anxiety. Results: People with UHC had higher odds of depression (OR = 2.11; p < 0.001) and anxiety (OR = 2.86; p < 0.001) than those without UHC. The odds of depression and anxiety were significantly higher for those with UHC and S-COVID-19-S (p < 0.001); and were significantly lower for those had UHC and interacted with "unchanged/more" physical activity (p < 0.001), or "unchanged/more" drinking (p < 0.001 for only anxiety), or "unchanged/healthier" eating (p < 0.001), and high PB score (p < 0.001), as compared to those without UHC and without S-COVID-19-S, "never/stopped/less" physical activity, drinking, "less healthy" eating, and low PB score, respectively. Conclusion: S-COVID-19-S worsen psychological health in patients with UHC. Physical activity, drinking, healthier eating, and high PB score were protective factors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Depression , Outpatients , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Vietnam/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253154, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cohorts of hospitalized COVID-19 patients have been studied in several countries since the beginning of the pandemic. So far, there is no complete survey of older patients in a German district that includes both outpatients and inpatients. In this retrospective observational cohort study, we aimed to investigate risk factors, mortality, and functional outcomes of all patients with COVID-19 aged 70 and older living in the district of Tübingen in the southwest of Germany. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed all 256 patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in one of the earliest affected German districts during the first wave of the disease from February to April 2020. To ensure inclusion of all infected patients, we analysed reported data from the public health department as well as the results of a comprehensive screening intervention in all nursing homes of the district (n = 1169). Furthermore, we examined clinical data of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (n = 109). RESULTS: The all-cause mortality was 18%. Screening in nursing homes showed a point-prevalence of 4.6%. 39% of residents showed no COVID-specific symptoms according to the official definition at that time. The most important predictors of mortality were the need for inpatient treatment (odds ratio (OR): 3.95 [95%-confidence interval (CI): 2.00-7.86], p<0.001) and care needs before infection (non-hospitalized patients: OR: 3.79 [95%-CI: 1.01-14.27], p = 0.037, hospitalized patients: OR: 2.89 [95%-CI 1.21-6.92], p = 0.015). Newly emerged care needs were a relevant complication of COVID-19: 27% of previously self-sufficient patients who survived the disease were not able to return to their home environment after discharge from the hospital. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate the importance of a differentiated view of risk groups and long-term effects within the older population. These findings should be included in the political and social debate during the ongoing pandemic to evaluate the true effect of COVID-19 on healthcare systems and individual functional status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Data Collection/methods , Data Collection/statistics & numerical data , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
18.
Nature ; 594(7862): 259-264, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275936

ABSTRACT

The acute clinical manifestations of COVID-19 have been well characterized1,2, but the post-acute sequelae of this disease have not been comprehensively described. Here we use the national healthcare databases of the US Department of Veterans Affairs to systematically and comprehensively identify 6-month incident sequelae-including diagnoses, medication use and laboratory abnormalities-in patients with COVID-19 who survived for at least 30 days after diagnosis. We show that beyond the first 30 days of illness, people with COVID-19 exhibit a higher risk of death and use of health resources. Our high-dimensional approach identifies incident sequelae in the respiratory system, as well as several other sequelae that include nervous system and neurocognitive disorders, mental health disorders, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, malaise, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain and anaemia. We show increased incident use of several therapeutic agents-including pain medications (opioids and non-opioids) as well as antidepressant, anxiolytic, antihypertensive and oral hypoglycaemic agents-as well as evidence of laboratory abnormalities in several organ systems. Our analysis of an array of prespecified outcomes reveals a risk gradient that increases according to the severity of the acute COVID-19 infection (that is, whether patients were not hospitalized, hospitalized or admitted to intensive care). Our findings show that a substantial burden of health loss that spans pulmonary and several extrapulmonary organ systems is experienced by patients who survive after the acute phase of COVID-19. These results will help to inform health system planning and the development of multidisciplinary care strategies to reduce chronic health loss among individuals with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Databases, Factual , Datasets as Topic , Electronic Health Records , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/physiopathology , Male , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Risk , Time Factors , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e26558, 2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an abrupt reduction in the use of in-person health care, accompanied by a corresponding surge in the use of telehealth services. However, the extent and nature of changes in health care utilization during the pandemic may differ by care setting. Knowledge of the impact of the pandemic on health care utilization is important to health care organizations and policy makers. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are (1) to evaluate changes in in-person health care utilization and telehealth visits during the COVID-19 pandemic and (2) to assess the difference in changes in health care utilization between the pandemic year 2020 and the prepandemic year 2019. METHODS: We retrospectively assembled a cohort consisting of members of a large integrated health care organization, who were enrolled between January 6 and November 2, 2019 (prepandemic year), and between January 5 and October 31, 2020 (pandemic year). The rates of visits were calculated weekly for four settings: inpatient, emergency department (ED), outpatient, and telehealth. Using Poisson models, we assessed the impact of the pandemic on health care utilization during the early days of the pandemic and conducted difference-in-deference (DID) analyses to measure the changes in health care utilization, adjusting for the trend of health care utilization in the prepandemic year. RESULTS: In the early days of the pandemic, we observed significant reductions in inpatient, ED, and outpatient utilization (by 30.2%, 37.0%, and 80.9%, respectively). By contrast, there was a 4-fold increase in telehealth visits between weeks 8 (February 23) and 12 (March 22) in 2020. DID analyses revealed that after adjusting for prepandemic secular trends, the reductions in inpatient, ED, and outpatient visit rates in the early days of the pandemic were 1.6, 8.9, and 367.2 visits per 100 person-years (P<.001), respectively, while the increase in telehealth visits was 272.9 visits per 100 person-years (P<.001). Further analyses suggested that the increase in telehealth visits offset the reduction in outpatient visits by week 26 (June 28, 2020). CONCLUSIONS: In-person health care utilization decreased drastically during the early period of the pandemic, but there was a corresponding increase in telehealth visits during the same period. By end-June 2020, the combined outpatient and telehealth visits had recovered to prepandemic levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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