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1.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(Suppl 1): 80-82, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782928

ABSTRACT

In 2017, ten veteran patients with the shared experience of living with chronic pain united to form a Veteran Engagement Panel (VEP) to support the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute® (PCORI®)funded Veterans Pain Care Organizational Improvement Comparative Effectiveness (VOICE) Study. The study, conducted at ten Veterans Affairs (VA) sites, compares two team-based approaches to improve pain management and reduce potential harms of opioid therapy. The panel shares ten best practices for sustaining a successful engagement partnership.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Veterans , Chronic Pain/therapy , Humans , Pain Management , Patient Outcome Assessment , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 846042, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776056

ABSTRACT

Introduction: There is a dearth of research on the incidence and treatment of cancer pain in Africa. Yet Africa, with other developing countries, accounts for more than half of all cancer diagnoses, and it is estimated that cancer incidence in Africa will double by 2030. Objectives: This research protocol outlines an approach to investigate cancer pain in French-speaking African countries. The protocol intends to determine and describe the treatment and management of cancer pain in these countries. Barriers to treating cancer pain will be explored and the results will be collated to make a series of recommendations on policy positions, regulatory frameworks and protocols. Methods: A mixed-methods, co-creation methodology has been selected to ensure the societal impact of the research outcomes. This research will use both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods and analyses. The research will begin with a review of the policies and legislation that exist in relation to cancer pain management and the use of analgesics, in each French-speaking African country. An Experts Steering Committee will then be created to provide guidance on the protocol and research design and access to participants, as well as to execute on the administration of surveys to local structures and international experts. A series of semi-structured, qualitative interviews with experts and clinicians in the field of screening and management of cancer pain and access to treatment will follow. Purposive and snowball sampling will be used to select the respondent experts. The semi-structured interviews will be conducted to determine the main trends and barriers to the treatment of cancer pain in French-speaking African countries. From this qualitative research, two surveys will be developed and then administered: one to validate the policy and regulatory context, and the other to determine experts and healthcare professionals experience and perceptions of cancer pain. Results/Conclusions: The results will be analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods to determine themes and perceptions of cancer pain and treatment, from the policy level to the healthcare professional level. Evaluation of the results will lead to recommendations for a comprehensive framework for cancer pain treatment in French-speaking Africa.


Subject(s)
Analgesics , Neoplasms , Pain Management , Africa , Analgesics/supply & distribution , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Health Personnel , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Pain Management/methods
3.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 147(6): 319-325, 2022 03.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740507

ABSTRACT

MONITORING OF ANALGESIA, SEDATION AND DELIRIUM: The prerequisite for monitoring goal-oriented analgesia and screening for the presence of delirium is the use of validated measuring instruments such as the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale as well as an adequate medical and intensive care staffing ratio. IMPLEMENTATION OF ANALGESIA AND SEDATION: The goal, if possible, is an awake, oriented, cooperative patient who is free of pain. In this regard, multimodal analgesic treatment is of great importance. The lowest possible sedation should also be aimed for in COVID-19 patients, although deep sedation is recommended for invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients in the prone position.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , COVID-19 , Delirium , COVID-19/therapy , Delirium/therapy , Humans , Pain , Pain Management
4.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e30880, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714893

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internet-based treatment programs present a solution for providing access to pain management for those unable to access clinic-based multidisciplinary pain programs. Attrition from internet interventions is a common issue. Clinician-supported guidance can be an important feature in web-based interventions; however, the optimal level of therapist guidance and expertise required to improve adherence remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate whether augmenting the existing Reboot Online program with telephone support by a clinician improves program adherence and effectiveness compared with the web-based program alone. METHODS: A 2-armed, CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials)-compliant, registered randomized controlled trial with one-to-one group allocation was conducted. It compared a web-based multidisciplinary pain management program, Reboot Online, combined with telephone support (n=44) with Reboot Online alone (n=45) as the control group. Participants were recruited through web-based social media and the This Way Up service provider network. The primary outcome for this study was adherence to the Reboot Online program. Adherence was quantified through three metrics: completion of the program, the number of participants who enrolled into the program, and the number of participants who commenced the program. Data on adherence were collected automatically through the This Way Up platform. Secondary measures of clinical effectiveness were also collected. RESULTS: Reboot Online combined with telephone support had a positive effect on enrollment and commencement of the program compared with Reboot Online without telephone support. Significantly more participants from the Reboot Online plus telephone support group enrolled (41/44, 93%) into the course than those from the control group (35/45, 78%; χ21=4.2; P=.04). Furthermore, more participants from the intervention group commenced the course than those from the control group (40/44, 91% vs 27/45, 60%, respectively; χ21=11.4; P=.001). Of the participants enrolled in the intervention group, 43% (19/44) completed the course, and of those in the control group, 31% (14/45) completed the course. When considering the subgroup of those who commenced the program, there was no significant difference between the proportions of people who completed all 8 lessons in the intervention (19/40, 48%) and control groups (14/27, 52%; χ21=1.3; P=.24). The treatment efficacy on clinical outcome measures did not differ between the intervention and control groups. CONCLUSIONS: Telephone support improves participants' registration, program commencement, and engagement in the early phase of the internet intervention; however, it did not seem to have an impact on overall course completion or efficacy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12619001076167; https://anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12619001076167.


Subject(s)
Internet-Based Intervention , Pain Management , Australia , Humans , Internet , Telephone , Treatment Outcome
6.
Obstet Gynecol ; 139(2): 287-296, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662137

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The endocannabinoid system is involved in pain perception and inflammation. Cannabis contains delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), which are cannabinoids that bind to endocannabinoid system receptors. A fatty acid amide called palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) enhances endogenous cannabinoids. Given that use of medical cannabis is increasing, we sought to characterize patterns of cannabis use for gynecologic pain and its effectiveness as an analgesic. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrials.gov using terms for "woman," "cannabis," and "pain" or "pelvic pain" or "endometriosis" or "bladder pain" or "cancer." The search was restricted to English-language articles published between January 1990 and April 2021 and excluded animal studies. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: The initial search yielded 5,189 articles with 3,822 unique citations. Studies were included if they evaluated nonpregnant adult women who used cannabinoids for gynecologic pain conditions (eg, chronic pelvic pain, vulvodynia, endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, malignancy). Study types included were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies. Covidence systematic review software was used. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Fifty-nine studies were considered for full review, and 16 met inclusion criteria. Prevalence of cannabis use ranged from 13% to 27%. Most women ingested or inhaled cannabis and used cannabis multiple times per week, with dosages of THC and CBD up to 70 mg and 2,000 mg, respectively. Sixty-one to 95.5% reported pain relief. All six prospective cohort studies and one RCT of PEA-combination medications reported significant pain relief, and the average decrease in pain after 3 months of treatment was 3.35±1.39 on the 10-point visual analog scale. However, one fatty acid amide enzyme inhibitor RCT did not show pain reduction. CONCLUSION: Survey data showed that most women reported that cannabis improved pain from numerous gynecologic conditions. Cohort studies and an RCT using PEA-combination medications reported pain reduction. However, interpretation of the studies is limited due to varying cannabis formulations, delivery methods, and dosages that preclude a definitive statement about cannabis for gynecologic pain relief. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO, CRD42021248057.


Subject(s)
Genital Diseases, Female/therapy , Medical Marijuana/therapeutic use , Pain Management , Female , Humans
7.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 23(1): 1-2, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650114
8.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 63(1): 98-105, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632820

ABSTRACT

CONTEXTS: Inadequate pain management in community pediatric palliative care is common. Evidence to inform improved pain management in this population is limited. OBJECTIVES: To explore the barriers and facilitators to pediatric community-based pain management for infants, children and young people at end-of-life as perceived by healthcare professionals. METHODS: A qualitative interview study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 29 healthcare professionals; 12 nurses, five GPs, five consultants and registrar doctors, two pharmacists and five support therapists working in primary, secondary or tertiary care in the United Kingdom and involved in community end-of life care of 0 to 18-year-olds. RESULTS: The data corpus was analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis and seven themes emerged: parents' abilities, beliefs and wellbeing; working relationships between families and healthcare professionals, and between healthcare teams; healthcare professionals' knowledge, education and experience; health services delivery; nature of pain treatment; and pediatric-specific factors. Across themes, the concepts of partnership working between families and healthcare professionals, and within healthcare teams, and sharing expertise were prevalent. CONCLUSION: Partnership working and trust between healthcare professionals and parents, and within healthcare teams, is needed for effective at-home pediatric palliative pain management. Community healthcare professionals require more education from experienced multidisciplinary teams to effectively manage pediatric pain at end-of-life and prevent emergency hospice or hospital admissions, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pain Management , Adolescent , Child , Death , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594182

ABSTRACT

The study aim was to explore the effects of multisensory breastmilk interventions on short-term pain of infants during newborn screening. This is a randomized controlled trial. A total of 120 newborns were recruited and assigned by randomization to one of three treatment conditions: Condition 1 = routine care (gentle touch + verbal comfort); Condition 2 = breastmilk odor + routine care; or Condition 3 = breastmilk odor + taste + routine care. Pain was scored with the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS). Data were collected from video recordings at 1 min intervals over the 11 phases of heel sticks: phase 1, 5 min before heel stick without stimuli (baseline); phase 2 to phase 6 (during heel stick); and phase 7 to phase 11 (recovery). Generalized estimating equations compared differences in pain scores for newborns over phases among the three conditions. Compared with the routine care, provision of the odor and taste of breastmilk reduce NIPS scores during heel sticks (B = -4.36, SE = 0.45, p < 0.001 [phase6]), and during recovery (B = -3.29, SE = 0.42, p < 0.001 [phase7]). Our findings provide new data, which supports the use of multisensory interventions that include breastmilk odor and taste in combination with gentle touch and verbal comfort to relieve pain in infants undergoing newborn screening.


Subject(s)
Milk, Human , Neonatal Screening , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Pain/diagnosis , Pain/prevention & control , Pain Management
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580720

ABSTRACT

Due to a lack of published evidence on the topic, a modified Delphi approach was used to develop recommendations useful for chronic pain management during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on the available literature and personal clinical expertise, an Italian board of nine professionals from different disciplines identified four main topics: prevention of chronic pain, treatment of chronic pain, consequences of inadequate treatment, and perspectives. They elaborated a semi-structured questionnaire. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in the field of pain management was requested to comment on the statements. Based on the answers provided, a structured questionnaire was prepared (Round 1). It included 21 statements divided into three categories (organizational issues; diagnosis and therapies; telemedicine and future perspectives). A five-point Likert scale was adopted. The threshold for consensus was set at a minimum of 70% of the number of respondents (level of agreement ≥ 4, Agree or Strongly Agree). A final questionnaire with rephrasing of the statements that did not reach the consensus threshold was elaborated (Round 2). A total of 29 clinicians were included in the panel. Twenty clinicians (69%) responded in both the first and second round. After two rounds, consensus (≥70%) was achieved in 20 out of 21 statements. The lack of consensus was recorded for the statement regarding the management of post-COVID pain (55%; Median 4; IQR 2.3). Another statement on telemedicine reached the threshold in the first round (70%), but the value was not confirmed in Round 2 (65%; Median 4; IQR 2). Most of the proposed items reached consensus, suggesting the need to make organizational changes, the structuring of careful diagnostic and therapeutic pathways, and the application of new technologies in pain medicine. Long-COVID-19 care is an issue that needs further research. Remote assistance for chronic pain must be regulated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Pain Management , COVID-19/complications , Chronic Pain/diagnosis , Chronic Pain/therapy , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , Pandemics
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e26292, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574360

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain is the most prevalent chronic pain condition worldwide and access to behavioral pain treatment is limited. Virtual reality (VR) is an immersive technology that may provide effective behavioral therapeutics for chronic pain. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to conduct a double-blind, parallel-arm, single-cohort, remote, randomized placebo-controlled trial for a self-administered behavioral skills-based VR program in community-based individuals with self-reported chronic low back pain during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A national online convenience sample of individuals with self-reported nonmalignant low back pain with duration of 6 months or more and with average pain intensity of 4 or more/10 was enrolled and randomized 1:1 to 1 of 2 daily (56-day) VR programs: (1) EaseVRx (immersive pain relief skills VR program); or (2) Sham VR (2D nature content delivered in a VR headset). Objective device use data and self-reported data were collected. The primary outcomes were the between-group effect of EaseVRx versus Sham VR across time points, and the between-within interaction effect representing the change in average pain intensity and pain-related interference with activity, stress, mood, and sleep over time (baseline to end-of-treatment at day 56). Secondary outcomes were global impression of change and change in physical function, sleep disturbance, pain self-efficacy, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain medication use, and user satisfaction. Analytic methods included intention-to-treat and a mixed-model framework. RESULTS: The study sample was 179 adults (female: 76.5%, 137/179; Caucasian: 90.5%, 162/179; at least some college education: 91.1%, 163/179; mean age: 51.5 years [SD 13.1]; average pain intensity: 5/10 [SD 1.2]; back pain duration ≥5 years: 67%, 120/179). No group differences were found for any baseline variable or treatment engagement. User satisfaction ratings were higher for EaseVRx versus Sham VR (P<.001). For the between-groups factor, EaseVRx was superior to Sham VR for all primary outcomes (highest P value=.009), and between-groups Cohen d effect sizes ranged from 0.40 to 0.49, indicating superiority was moderately clinically meaningful. For EaseVRx, large pre-post effect sizes ranged from 1.17 to 1.3 and met moderate to substantial clinical importance for reduced pain intensity and pain-related interference with activity, mood, and stress. Between-group comparisons for Physical Function and Sleep Disturbance showed superiority for the EaseVRx group versus the Sham VR group (P=.022 and .013, respectively). Pain catastrophizing, pain self-efficacy, pain acceptance, prescription opioid use (morphine milligram equivalent) did not reach statistical significance for either group. Use of over-the-counter analgesic use was reduced for EaseVRx (P<.01) but not for Sham VR. CONCLUSIONS: EaseVRx had high user satisfaction and superior and clinically meaningful symptom reduction for average pain intensity and pain-related interference with activity, mood, and stress compared to sham VR. Additional research is needed to determine durability of treatment effects and to characterize mechanisms of treatment effects. Home-based VR may expand access to effective and on-demand nonpharmacologic treatment for chronic low back pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04415177; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04415177. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/25291.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain/therapy , Health Behavior , Low Back Pain/therapy , Pain Management/methods , Virtual Reality , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Self Report , Time Factors , Young Adult
12.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 103(3): 418-423, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509567

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore patients' thoughts and satisfaction with using videoconferencing during the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study aimed to gather (1) patient feedback and satisfaction with videoconferencing across all health professions as well as divided into a subgroup for each profession, (2) patient preferences for either videoconference or face-to-face consultations during the pandemic lockdown, and (3) whether patients would consider using videoconferencing once face-to-face appointments were available. DESIGN: An observational cross-sectional, mixed methods study design. SETTING: Tertiary-level persistent pain center. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-five patients aged 18 to 85 years with persistent pain lasting more than 12 months. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Data were collected using a patient survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report findings from 5-point Likert scales. Qualitative analysis was guided by content analysis to organize and categorize the open-ended survey response text. RESULTS: Videoconferencing platform features including audiovisual, usability, and privacy worked well for most patients (≥90%). Two-thirds of those surveyed reported the videoconferencing sessions as equal to face-to-face attendance (68%). In the context of the pandemic, almost as many preferred videoconferencing (65%), whereas 26% preferred face-to-face attendance and 9% were unsure. Preferences for videoconferencing over face-to-face in context to the pandemic varied depending on the health discipline involved: pharmacy (83%), occupational therapy (78%), psychology (61%), pain specialist physician (59%), and physiotherapy (53%). Even outside of a pandemic situation, 80% would consider using videoconferencing in the future. Qualitative analysis on an open-ended question asking patients for any further comments regarding their experience with the videoconference consultation, found 3 main categories: (1) overall satisfaction with videoconferencing, (2) technology qualities and (3) clinical interaction. CONCLUSION: In the context of a pandemic, videoconferencing for interdisciplinary persistent pain management services was effective and preferred, and most patients would continue its use into the future. Alternative or mixed modes of support may be needed for the 26% who currently prefer onsite attendance, when that mode of delivery is not available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Pain Management/methods , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Videoconferencing , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Preference , Physical Therapy Modalities , Qualitative Research , Queensland/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods
13.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 46(5): 398-403, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503798

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The femoral nerve block (FNB) may be used for analgesia in hip fracture surgery. The pericapsular nerve group (PENG) block is a novel regional technique and may provide better pain reduction while preserving motor function, but these blocks have not been directly compared. METHODS: In a single-center double-blinded randomized comparative trial, patients presenting for hip fracture surgery received analgesia with either FNB or PENG block. The primary outcome measure was pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) 0 to 10). Secondary outcomes were postoperative quadriceps strength, opiate use, complications, length of hospital stay, and patient-reported outcomes. RESULTS: Sixty patients were randomized and equally allocated between groups. Baseline demographics were similar. Postoperatively in recovery (day 0), the PENG group experienced less pain compared with the FNB group. (In the PENG group, 63% experienced no pain, 27% mild pain, and 10% moderate to severe pain. In comparison, 30% of the FNB group reported no pain, 27% mild pain, and 36% moderate to severe pain; p=0.04). This was assessed using an 11-point Likert NRS. Quadriceps strength was better preserved in the PENG group in the recovery unit (assessed using Oxford muscle strength grading, 60% intact in the PENG group vs none intact in the FNB group; p<0.001) and on day 1 (90% intact vs 50%, respectively; p=0.004). There was no difference in other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving a PENG block for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia during hip fracture surgery experience less postoperative pain in the recovery room with no difference detected by postoperative day 1. Quadriceps strength was better preserved with the PENG block. Despite the short-term analgesic benefit and improved quadriceps strength, there were no differences detected in the quality of recovery.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , Nerve Block , Femoral Nerve , Humans , Pain Management , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Pain, Postoperative/prevention & control
15.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 46(10): 840-859, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The past two decades have witnessed an epidemic of opioid use disorder (OUD) in the USA, resulting in catastrophic loss of life secondary to opioid overdoses. Medication treatment of opioid use disorder (MOUD) is effective, yet barriers to care continue to result in a large proportion of untreated individuals. Optimal analgesia can be obtained in patients with MOUD within the perioperative period. Anesthesiologists and pain physicians can recommend and consider initiating MOUD in patients with suspected OUD at the point of care; this can serve as a bridge to comprehensive treatment and ultimately save lives. METHODS: The Board of Directors of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, American Society of Anesthesiologists, American Academy of Pain Medicine, American Society of Addiction Medicine and American Society of Health System Pharmacists approved the creation of a Multisociety Working Group on Opioid Use Disorder, representing the fields of pain medicine, addiction, and pharmacy health sciences. An extensive literature search was performed by members of the working group. Multiple study types were included and reviewed for quality. A modified Delphi process was used to assess the literature and expert opinion for each topic, with 100% consensus being achieved on the statements and each recommendation. The consensus statements were then graded by the committee members using the United States Preventive Services Task Force grading of evidence guidelines. In addition to the consensus recommendations, a narrative overview of buprenorphine, including pharmacology and legal statutes, was performed. RESULTS: Two core topics were identified for the development of recommendations with >75% consensus as the goal for consensus; however, the working group achieved 100% consensus on both topics. Specific topics included (1) providing recommendations to aid physicians in the management of patients receiving buprenorphine for MOUD in the perioperative setting and (2) providing recommendations to aid physicians in the initiation of buprenorphine in patients with suspected OUD in the perioperative setting. CONCLUSIONS: To decrease the risk of OUD recurrence, buprenorphine should not be routinely discontinued in the perioperative setting. Buprenorphine can be initiated in untreated patients with OUD and acute pain in the perioperative setting to decrease the risk of opioid recurrence and death from overdose.


Subject(s)
Acute Pain , Buprenorphine , Opioid-Related Disorders , Acute Pain/drug therapy , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Buprenorphine/adverse effects , Humans , Opioid-Related Disorders/diagnosis , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Opioid-Related Disorders/prevention & control , Pain Management , United States
16.
Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim (Engl Ed) ; 68(9): 495-503, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475016

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection has evolved into a pandemic and a Public Health Emergency of International Importance that has forced health organizations at the global, regional and local levels to adopt a series of measures to address to COVID-19 and try to reduce its impact, not only in the social sphere but also in the health sphere, modifying the guidelines for action in the health services. Within these recommendations that include the Pain Treatment Units, patients with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection may be waiting for medical consult or interventional procedures for the management of chronic pain refractory to other therapies. A series of guidelines aimed at reducing the risk of infection of health personnel, other patients and the community are included in this manuscript.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Humans , Pain Management , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 23(1): 48-54, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474965

ABSTRACT

AIM: This research was conducted to determine the pain experience of individuals who experience pain during COVID-19 infection. METHOD: The research was carried out with the phenomenological qualitative design, and was completed with 15 participants. The data of the study were collected with the descriptive characteristics form, a semi-structured interview form about pain experienced during COVID-19 infection and Numeric Rating Scale. Descriptive and content analysis methods were used in the evaluation of qualitative data. RESULTS: The data of the research were examined in 6 themes: 1) "pain from the perspective of participants"; 2) "characteristics of pain experienced during COVID-19 infection"; 3) "the effect of pain experienced during COVID-19 infection on daily life"; 4) "management of pain experienced during COVID-19 infection"; 5) "fear of re-experiencing the pain experienced during COVID-19 infection"; and 6) "metaphors for pain experienced during COVID-19 infection". CONCLUSIONS: Participants generally defined pain as a feeling that hurts and causes people to suffer. The participants used many methods to relieve the intense pain they experienced. However, nearly half of the participants stated that their pain did not completely disappear despite the many methods they used. The approximately two-thirds of the participants were afraid of re-experiencing this pain. For effective pain management, it is important to define the pain behaviors of the patients correctly, to determine the opinions of the patients about the pain, and to evaluate the effects of the pain experienced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pain , Pain Management , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 23(1): 9-16, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Millions of people globally have been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. It's impact on pain management nurses roles' remains unknown. AIMS: To explore role changes among pain management nurses performing patient care during the Covid-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Qualitative descriptive research study. SETTINGS: The American Society for Pain Management Nursing's listserv, E-News Brief postings, and snowball sampling. PARTICIPANTS/SUBJECTS: English-speaking registered nurses or advanced practice registered nurses who provided direct patient care since 2020 were eligible. METHOD: Data were collected through individual, semi-structured telephone interviews. An interview guide was used and included questions about participants' characteristics and the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic on their roles in clinical work. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: A homogenous sample of eighteen nurses from the United States was interviewed. Their normal roles, roles during the pandemic, and surges in patients with Covid-19 as the condition for role changes emerged from their descriptions. Most participants did not experience significant changes in their normal roles, but all described how their normal functions were impacted by the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: As the infectious variants of this disease evolve or other disastrous conditions occur, further changes to roles may occur. The skill sets of pain management nurses, including understanding assessment of pain across the lifespan, administration of opioids and multimodal analgesia, monitoring of patients, and communicating by educating and consultations, reinforce the significant contribution pain management nurses have as valued team members in times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , Nurse's Role , Pain Management , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(9): e26623, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443943

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior studies have shown that virtual reality (VR) is an efficacious treatment modality for opioid-sparing pain management. However, the majority of these studies were conducted among primarily White, relatively advantaged populations and in well-resourced settings. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a qualitative, theory-informed implementation science study to assess the readiness for VR in safety-net settings. METHODS: Using the theoretical lens of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) framework, we conducted semistructured interviews with current VR users and nonusers based in safety-net health systems (n=15). We investigated barriers and facilitators to a commercially available, previously validated VR technology platform AppliedVR (Los Angeles, CA, USA). We used deductive qualitative analysis using the overarching domains of the CFIR framework and performed open, inductive coding to identify specific themes within each domain. RESULTS: Interviewees deemed the VR intervention to be useful, scalable, and an appealing alternative to existing pain management approaches. Both users and nonusers identified a lack of reimbursement for VR as a significant challenge for adoption. Current users cited positive patient feedback, but safety-net stakeholders voiced concern that existing VR content may not be relevant or appealing to diverse patients. All respondents acknowledged the challenge of integrating and maintaining VR in current pain management workflows across a range of clinical settings, and this adoption challenge was particularly acute, given resource and staffing constraints in safety-net settings. CONCLUSIONS: VR for pain management holds interest for frontline pain management clinicians and leadership in safety-net health settings but will require significant tailoring and adaption to address the needs of diverse populations. Integration into complex workflows for pain management is a significant barrier to adoption, and participants cited structural cost and reimbursement concerns as impediments to initial implementation and scaling of VR use.


Subject(s)
Virtual Reality , Analgesics, Opioid , Humans , Implementation Science , Pain Management
20.
Orv Hetil ; 162(38): 1511-1519, 2021 09 19.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430582

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. Az új koronavírusként megismert SARS-CoV-2-fertozés legsúlyosabb szövodményeként a gyulladásos folyamatok jelátvivo molekuláinak elszabadulása - az ún. citokinvihar - kritikus légzési elégtelenséggel társuló akut respirációs diszfunkciós szindrómát vagy többszervi gyulladásos szindrómát okoz. Mostanáig igazolódott, hogy a fertozések legnagyobb részben tünetmentesen vagy enyhe tünetekkel zajlanak. A betegség minden szakaszában elofordulhat enyhe vagy középsúlyos, ritkábban intenzív fájdalom, melyek enyhítésére számos fájdalomcsillapítási lehetoség áll rendelkezésre. A pandémia kezdete óta foglalkoznunk kell a tünetek enyhítésével, akár infektológiai osztályon, akár mutéti ellátás alkalmával. A betegek hazaengedését követoen figyelmet kell fordítanunk az intenzív osztályos ellátás utáni és a COVID-19-et követo tünetek és fájdalmak értékelésére. Idoszeru átfogó összefoglalónkban hangsúlyozzuk a különbözo fájdalomcsillapítók szerepét a COVID-19-fertozéssel összefüggo fájdalommal járó folyamatokban. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(38): 1511-1519. Summary. As the most severe consequence of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infection, the cytokine storm - caused by the liberalization of several inflammatory mediators - engenders critical respiratory dysfunction syndrome or multisystem inflammatory syndrome. The most proportion of infections has proven symptomless or with very mild signs of disease so far. Mild, moderate, or rarely intense pain can occur in every phase of the disease, for the treatment of which more than a few analgesic possibilities are readily available. From the start of the pandemic, we have been concerning to ameliorate the symptoms, in either the department of infectology, or operating suites. The post-intensive care pain and post-COVID symptoms should be evaluated and treated after discharge. In this timely and comprehensive article, the role and importance of different analgesics are articulated regarding the COVID-associated painful conditions. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(38): 1511-1519.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Pain , Pain Management , Pandemics
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