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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 829466, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776030

ABSTRACT

Aim: To examine the human exposure to perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate, and their associations with oral pain (OP) in the general population from the U.S. Methods: A total of 13,554 participants were enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The urinary perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate were measured using ion chromatography coupled with an electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The multivariable linear and logistic regressions were performed to explore the associations of the urinary perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate, with the prevalence of oral pain. Restricted cubic splines were used to explore the non-linearity. Results: There are 3,129 OP cases. There was a higher urinary level of perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate in OP. We found that urinary thiocyanate was positively associated with OP (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06; [1, 1.13]; p = 0.049). Restricted cubic spines revealed that urinary thiocyanate was in a U-shape association with OP. Conclusions: Urinary thiocyanate was in a U-shape association with OP, suggesting that we should keep the exposure of thiocyanate under a reasonable range.


Subject(s)
Mouth , Nitrates , Pain , Perchlorates , Thiocyanates , Environmental Exposure/adverse effects , Humans , Mouth/physiopathology , Nitrates/urine , Nutrition Surveys , Pain/epidemiology , Perchlorates/urine , Thiocyanates/urine , United States/epidemiology
2.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 103(3): 418-423, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509567

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore patients' thoughts and satisfaction with using videoconferencing during the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study aimed to gather (1) patient feedback and satisfaction with videoconferencing across all health professions as well as divided into a subgroup for each profession, (2) patient preferences for either videoconference or face-to-face consultations during the pandemic lockdown, and (3) whether patients would consider using videoconferencing once face-to-face appointments were available. DESIGN: An observational cross-sectional, mixed methods study design. SETTING: Tertiary-level persistent pain center. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-five patients aged 18 to 85 years with persistent pain lasting more than 12 months. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Data were collected using a patient survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report findings from 5-point Likert scales. Qualitative analysis was guided by content analysis to organize and categorize the open-ended survey response text. RESULTS: Videoconferencing platform features including audiovisual, usability, and privacy worked well for most patients (≥90%). Two-thirds of those surveyed reported the videoconferencing sessions as equal to face-to-face attendance (68%). In the context of the pandemic, almost as many preferred videoconferencing (65%), whereas 26% preferred face-to-face attendance and 9% were unsure. Preferences for videoconferencing over face-to-face in context to the pandemic varied depending on the health discipline involved: pharmacy (83%), occupational therapy (78%), psychology (61%), pain specialist physician (59%), and physiotherapy (53%). Even outside of a pandemic situation, 80% would consider using videoconferencing in the future. Qualitative analysis on an open-ended question asking patients for any further comments regarding their experience with the videoconference consultation, found 3 main categories: (1) overall satisfaction with videoconferencing, (2) technology qualities and (3) clinical interaction. CONCLUSION: In the context of a pandemic, videoconferencing for interdisciplinary persistent pain management services was effective and preferred, and most patients would continue its use into the future. Alternative or mixed modes of support may be needed for the 26% who currently prefer onsite attendance, when that mode of delivery is not available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Pain Management/methods , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Videoconferencing , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Preference , Physical Therapy Modalities , Qualitative Research , Queensland/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods
3.
Psychooncology ; 31(4): 649-660, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505558

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the psychological health status of patients diagnosed with cancer in Iraq during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aim was to measure the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among patients diagnosed with cancer. Secondary aims were to assess the association between depression, anxiety, and stress with sociodemographic characteristics, cancer-specific characteristics, patients' experience in healthcare visit, risk perception towards COVID-19, and health concern during the outbreak. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 1, 2020 and December 1, 2020 at an Oncology clinic in Baghdad. Included in the study were two hundred patients diagnosed with cancer. Data collected included: demographic variables (age, gender, residential location, marital status, education, employment status), clinical characteristics and cancer-specific parameters (duration since cancer diagnosis, cancer type, treatment duration, clinic visits frequency), experience during the pandemic (skipping or postponing treatment or periodical tests, suffering from new body pain, fear of acquiring the infection, fear of health deterioration), as well as psychological health status (depression, anxiety, stress). Pain, risk perception towards COVID-19, and health concern were measured using categorical Likert scale with responses being no, sometimes, and often. The psychological health status was measured by the "Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale" (DASS-21). Cut-off scores of the DASS-21 greater than 9, 7, and 14 represent a positive screen of depression, anxiety, and stress, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of patients who screened positive for depression was 22.0%, anxiety 22.0%, and stress 13.5%. The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress were significantly more in those who had university or higher education (34.3%, p-value <0.0001; 32.3%, p-value <0.0001; 19.2%, p-value = 0.02 respectively). Those were four times more likely to have depression and two times more likely to have anxiety than participants who had school education (OR = 4.40 CI [1.98-9.77], p-value <0.0001; OR = 2.55 CI [1.15-5.65], p-value = 0.02, respectively). The prevalence of anxiety was significantly the highest in the age group 16-39 years (40.9%) compared to 22.3% in the age group 40-64 years and 10.3% in the group ≥65 years (p-value = 0.02). Patients ≥65 years of age were less likely to develop anxiety compared to younger patients (OR = 0.44 CI [0.22-0.89], p-value = 0.02). As for the patients' experience in healthcare visit, 66 patients (33.0%) skipped or postponed their treatment or tests due to the outbreak. Around (8%) sometimes suffered from new body pain. Those who sometimes suffered from new body pain had significantly more depression than patients who did not suffer new pain or often had new pain (50.0% vs. 15.0% vs. 28.1% respectively, p-value = 0.002). Those were two times more likely to be depressed (OR = 2.18 CI [1.29-3.68], p-value = 0.003). Around (50%) of the patients were often afraid that their health would deteriorate during the outbreak. Those were significantly more depressed (31.7%, p-value = 0.002), anxious (30.7%, p-value <0.0001) and stressed (21.8%, p-value = 0.002) than those who did not have fear of losing their health and were two times more likely to have anxiety and stress. CONCLUSION: These findings, especially the association between developing new pain and depression, raised concerns regarding the psychological health in patients diagnosed with cancer during COVID-19 pandemic. It is crucial to implement psychological health screening for patients diagnosed with cancer during the pandemic to help prevent any psychological health problems. The DASS-21 could be used as a screening tool for distress in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Iraq/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27533, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501206

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Understanding the relationship between pain and physical activity (PA) levels is beneficial for maintaining good health status. However, the impact of pain on changes in PA during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine whether PA levels pre-, during, and post-COVID-19 state of emergency differ between Japanese adults who had pain after the COVID-19 state of emergency and those who did not.Data were collected from a cross-sectional online survey conducted between October 19 and 28, 2020. The analytic sample consisted of 1967 Japanese adults aged ≥40 years who completed the online survey. Participants completed questionnaires on the presence of pain and duration of PA, defined as the total PA time per week based on activity frequency and time. Participants were asked to report their PA at 3 time points: October 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic), April 2020 (during the COVID-19 state of emergency), and October 2020 (after the COVID-19 state of emergency).Among participants aged ≥60 years who reported pain in October 2020, the total PA time was significantly lower than participants who did not report having pain. Furthermore, the total PA time in April 2020 was significantly lower than that in October 2019; however, no significant difference in total PA time was observed between April and October 2020. Among participants aged 40 to 59 years, no significant differences were observed in total PA times at the 3 time points between those with and without pain. In addition, the total PA time in October 2020 significantly increased compared to that in April 2020, although it significantly decreased in April 2020 compared to October 2019.This study suggests that older adults with pain have lower PA levels after the COVID-19 state of emergency.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Pain/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 23(1): 26-30, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the pain and self-management status of patients with cancer and the influencing factors of pain and self-management status during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used. Eighty-one Chinese patients with cancer were recruited in December 2020. The Brief Pain Inventory, the Pain Management Inventory, and the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire were used to evaluate patients' pain and self-management status. Descriptive statistical analysis and multiple linear regression models were conducted for the research aims. RESULTS: Two thirds of the participants experienced moderate to severe pain. Cancer pain had moderate to severe interference on 90.12% of patients' lives. Self-management of pain in these participants was low. The most commonly used methods of pain management included adjusting activity intensity to avoid fatigue, using distraction techniques, and massaging the sore area. The most effective methods to manage pain included taking analgesics prescribed by doctor, taking over-the-counter analgesics, and massaging the sore area. Fifteen patients (18.5%) believed that the COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on pain management and 26 patients (32.1%) needed support. Pain education, pain interference on sleep, chemotherapy, and payment status were significantly associated with cancer patients 'pain self-management. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with cancer had moderate to severe pain intensity with low levels of self-management and self-efficacy towards that pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Self-Management , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Pain/drug therapy , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003773, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-COVID refers to a variety of symptoms affecting different organs reported by people following Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. To date, there have been no robust estimates of the incidence and co-occurrence of long-COVID features, their relationship to age, sex, or severity of infection, and the extent to which they are specific to COVID-19. The aim of this study is to address these issues. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on linked electronic health records (EHRs) data from 81 million patients including 273,618 COVID-19 survivors. The incidence and co-occurrence within 6 months and in the 3 to 6 months after COVID-19 diagnosis were calculated for 9 core features of long-COVID (breathing difficulties/breathlessness, fatigue/malaise, chest/throat pain, headache, abdominal symptoms, myalgia, other pain, cognitive symptoms, and anxiety/depression). Their co-occurrence network was also analyzed. Comparison with a propensity score-matched cohort of patients diagnosed with influenza during the same time period was achieved using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Cox proportional hazard model. The incidence of atopic dermatitis was used as a negative control. Among COVID-19 survivors (mean [SD] age: 46.3 [19.8], 55.6% female), 57.00% had one or more long-COVID feature recorded during the whole 6-month period (i.e., including the acute phase), and 36.55% between 3 and 6 months. The incidence of each feature was: abnormal breathing (18.71% in the 1- to 180-day period; 7.94% in the 90- to180-day period), fatigue/malaise (12.82%; 5.87%), chest/throat pain (12.60%; 5.71%), headache (8.67%; 4.63%), other pain (11.60%; 7.19%), abdominal symptoms (15.58%; 8.29%), myalgia (3.24%; 1.54%), cognitive symptoms (7.88%; 3.95%), and anxiety/depression (22.82%; 15.49%). All 9 features were more frequently reported after COVID-19 than after influenza (with an overall excess incidence of 16.60% and hazard ratios between 1.44 and 2.04, all p < 0.001), co-occurred more commonly, and formed a more interconnected network. Significant differences in incidence and co-occurrence were associated with sex, age, and illness severity. Besides the limitations inherent to EHR data, limitations of this study include that (i) the findings do not generalize to patients who have had COVID-19 but were not diagnosed, nor to patients who do not seek or receive medical attention when experiencing symptoms of long-COVID; (ii) the findings say nothing about the persistence of the clinical features; and (iii) the difference between cohorts might be affected by one cohort seeking or receiving more medical attention for their symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Long-COVID clinical features occurred and co-occurred frequently and showed some specificity to COVID-19, though they were also observed after influenza. Different long-COVID clinical profiles were observed based on demographics and illness severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Survivors , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Pain/etiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 18643, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428896

ABSTRACT

The aim of cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between loneliness, increased social isolation, and pain following the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 25,482 participants, aged 15-79 years, were assessed using an internet survey; the University of California, Los Angeles Loneliness Scale (Version 3), Short Form 3-item (UCLA-LS3-SF3) was used to assess loneliness, and a modified item of the UCLA-LS3-SF3 was used to measure the perception of increased social isolation during the pandemic. The outcome measures included the prevalence/incidence of pain (i.e., headache, neck or shoulder pain, upper limb pain, low back pain, and leg pain), pain intensity, and the prevalence of past/present chronic pain. Pain intensity was measured by the pain/discomfort item of the 5-level version of the EuroQol 5 Dimension scale. Odds ratios of pain prevalence/incidence and past/present chronic pain prevalence according to the UCLA-LS3-SF3 scoring groups (tertiles) and the frequency of the perceived increase in social isolation (categories 1-5) were calculated using multinomial logistic regression analysis. The mean pain intensity values among different loneliness and social isolation levels were tested using an analysis of covariance. Increased loneliness and the severity of the perceived social isolation were positively associated with the prevalence/incidence of pain, pain intensity, and the prevalence of past/present chronic pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Internet , Loneliness , Pain/psychology , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Prevalence , Young Adult
10.
Pain Med ; 23(2): 280-287, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting shelter-in-place orders have profoundly changed the everyday social environment. This study examines the relationship between pain and psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and loneliness) among U.S. adults ages 54 and older during the pandemic. We also test whether use of technology for social purposes moderates the association between pain severity and psychological distress. METHODS: Using cross-sectional data on 1,014 adults ages 54 and older (pain free, n = 637; mild pain, n = 106; moderate pain, n = 227; and severe pain, n = 64) from the 2020 Health and Retirement Study COVID-19 Project (Early, Version 1.0), we conducted regression analyses to test the association between pain severity and psychological outcomes and to assess social technology use frequency as a moderator. RESULTS: Compared with their pain-free peers, participants with mild-to-moderate pain reported more depressive symptoms and greater loneliness; those with severe pain reported higher levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness. Social technology use was associated with lower levels of depression and loneliness. However, interaction analyses show that social technology use predicted an increase in depression for individuals with pain but a decrease in depression among pain-free individuals. For anxiety and loneliness, no significant effects of social technology use were observed. CONCLUSION: Older adults with pain are at high risk of depression, anxiety, and loneliness during the pandemic. Although social technologies have become a common alternative to face-to-face interactions during the COVID-19 crisis, and overall they can provide mental health benefits, our results suggest that social technologies can be detrimental to psychological well-being among people with pain. These findings can inform technology-based interventions aiming to promote well-being among older adults with pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255383, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2019, a majority of runners participating in running events were female and 49% were of childbearing age. Studies have reported that women are initiating or returning to running after childbirth with up to 35% reporting pain. There are no studies exploring running-related pain or risk factors for this pain after childbirth in runners. Postpartum runners have a variety of biomechanical, musculoskeletal, and physiologic impairments from which to recover from when returning to high impact sports like running, which could influence initiating or returning to running. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify risk factors associated with running-related pain in postpartum runners with and without pain. This study also aimed to understand the compounding effects of multiple associative risk factors by developing a clinical decision tool to identify postpartum runners at higher risk for pain. METHODS: Postpartum runners with at least one child ≤36 months who ran once a week and postpartum runners unable to run because of pain, but identified as runners, were surveyed. Running variables (mileage, time to first postpartum run), postpartum variables (delivery type, breastfeeding, incontinence, sleep, fatigue, depression), and demographic information were collected. Risk factors for running-related pain were analyzed in bivariate regression models. Variables meeting criteria (P<0.15) were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model to create a clinical decision tool. The tool identified compounding factors that increased the probability of having running-related pain after childbirth. RESULTS: Analyses included 538 postpartum runners; 176 (32.7%) reporting running-related pain. Eleven variables were included in the multivariate model with six retained in the clinical decision tool: runner type-novice (OR 3.51; 95% CI 1.65, 7.48), postpartum accumulated fatigue score of >19 (OR 2.48; 95% CI 1.44, 4.28), previous running injury (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.31, 2.91), vaginal delivery (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.06, 2.50), incontinence (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.31, 2.84) and <6.8 hours of sleep on average per night (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.28, 2.78). Having ≥ 4 risk factors increased the probability of having running-related pain to 61.2%. CONCLUSION: The results of this study provide a deeper understanding of the risk factors for running-related pain in postpartum runners. With this information, clinicians can monitor and educate postpartum runners initiating or returning to running. Education could include details of risk factors, combinations of factors for pain and strategies to mitigate risks. Coaches can adapt running workload accounting for fatigue and sleep fluctuations to optimize recovery and performance. Future longitudinal studies that follow asymptomatic postpartum women returning to running after childbirth over time should be performed to validate these findings.


Subject(s)
Pain/epidemiology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Running/physiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Pain/etiology , Postpartum Period/physiology , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , Running/psychology
12.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 89: 128-133, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2020 the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic imposed a total and sudden lockdown. We aimed to investigate the consequences of the first COVID-19 lockdown (mid-March - mid-April 2020) on motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS) in a cohort of French people with Parkinson's disease (PwP). METHODS: PwP were enrolled either by an on-line survey sent from the national France Parkinson association (FP) to reach the French community of PwP or as part of outpatients' telemedicine visits followed by an hospital-based Parkinson Expert Center (PEC). All patients were evaluated using the same standardized questionnaire assessing motor and NMS (including a list of most disabling, new or worsened symptoms and Patient's Global Impression-Improvement scales [PGI-I]) psycho-social queries and quality of life. RESULTS: 2653 PwP were included: 441 (16.6%) in the PEC group and 2122 (83.4%) in the community-based group. Physiotherapy was interrupted among 88.6% of the patients. 40.9% referred a clinical modification of their symptoms. Based on the questionnaire, pain (9.3%), rigidity (9.1%) and tremor (8.5%) were the three most frequently new or worsened reported symptoms. Based on the PGI-I, the motor symptoms were the most affected domain, followed by pain and psychic state. PwP in community-based group tended to have more frequent worsening for motor symptoms, motor complications, pain and confusion than those of the PEC group. CONCLUSIONS: The first COVID-19 lockdown had a negative impact on motor and NMS of PwP. Efforts should be allocated to avoid interruption of care, including physiotherapy and physical activities and implement telemedicine. .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , France , Humans , Muscle Rigidity/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Physical Therapy Modalities , Quality of Life , Quarantine/psychology , Remote Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Tremor/epidemiology
13.
BMC Palliat Care ; 20(1): 102, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the time of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden, little was known about how effective our regular end-of-life care strategies would be for patients dying from COVID-19 in hospitals. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate end-of-life care for patients dying from COVID-19 in hospitals in Sweden up until up until 12 November 2020. METHODS: Data were collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. Hospital deaths during 2020 for patients with COVID-19 were included and compared to a reference cohort of hospital patients who died during 2019. Logistic regression was used to compare the groups and to control for impact of sex, age and a diagnosis of dementia. RESULTS: The COVID-19 group (1476 individuals) had a lower proportion of women and was older compared to the reference cohort (13,158 individuals), 81.8 versus 80.6 years (p < .001). Breathlessness was more commonly reported in the COVID-19 group compared to the reference cohort (72% vs 43%, p < .001). Furthermore, anxiety and delirium were more commonly and respiratory secretions, nausea and pain were less commonly reported during the last week in life in the COVID-19 group (p < .001 for all five symptoms). When present, complete relief of anxiety (p = .021), pain (p = .025) and respiratory secretions (p = .037) was more often achieved in the COVID-19 group. In the COVID-19 group, 57% had someone present at the time of death compared to 77% in the reference cohort (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The standard medical strategies for symptom relief and end-of-life care in hospitals seemed to be acceptable. Symptoms in COVID-19 deaths in hospitals were relieved as much as or even to a higher degree than in hospitals in 2019. Importantly, though, as a result of closing the hospitals to relatives and visitors, patients dying from COVID-19 more frequently died alone, and healthcare providers were not able to substitute for absent relatives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Palliative Care , Terminal Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Delirium/epidemiology , Delirium/virology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/virology , Pain/epidemiology , Pain/virology , Registries , Sweden/epidemiology , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273436

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic can have a negative impact on patients with mood disorders. The aim of this study is to explore the societal influence of COVID-19 and associated impacts on levels of depression, sleep disturbance, and subjective pain among patients with mood disorders. This cross-sectional study recruited inpatients with depression and bipolar disorder. Levels of depression, sleep disturbance, subjective pain, and related demographic variables were collected through self-reported questionnaires. Potential factors associated with levels of depression, sleep disturbance, and subjective pain were identified using univariate linear regression and further entered into a stepwise multivariate linear regression model to identify the independent predictors. A total of 119 participants were included in the analysis, of whom 50.42% had bipolar disorder and 49.58% had unipolar depression. Multivariate analysis showed that a higher level of depression was associated with female subjects, subjects with partners, present history of psychological trauma, and drinking alcohol. Sleep disturbance was associated with subjects with partners and drinking alcohol. A higher level of subjective pain was associated with a higher level of social anxiety and a history of psychological trauma. The current study identified several predictors of psychological burden and subjective pain among inpatients with depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further investigations are warranted to extend the application and generalizability of our results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
15.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(4): 4338-4353, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200422

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the uncontrolled increase of those affected by the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus, COVID-19, and the possibility of the health system collapsing in Spain, the Royal Decree 463/2020, of March 14th, declared a state of alarm for the management of this health crisis. The whole population, despite their social background, were confined inside their homes during this arduous situation. There are numerous articles that endorse the idea that their home conditions, the number of people with whom they coexist with, their employment, gender, amount of physical exercise, as well as their body mass index and their diagnosis in COVID-19 are characteristics that may represent an increased risk of suffering pain and changes in their quality of life. We proposed a study to determine the impact of the confinement on pain, quality of life and public health of the Spanish population due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An observational study was carried out during April and May 2020 through an online survey. It was statistically analysed through descriptive analysis and inferential analysis by bivariate logistic regression, ordinal logistic and Pearson's chi square. RESULTS: A total of 225 questionnaires were obtained between April and May 2020. For subjects suffering pain before confinement, significant relationships were drawn between experiencing pain and work-related activities (P=0.006), as well as, physical activity or the absence of it (P=0.033). In addition, an important association between experiencing pain and gender was discovered, both for people suffering pain before and during confinement (P=0.007 and P=0.011). Furthermore, the confinement has affected the quality of life of those affected, particularly in relation with suffering pain before and during confinement (P=0.001 and P=0.000), Job type (P=0.016) and BMI (P=0.025) and affecting more Physical Role, Emotional Role and Mental Health, followed by Physical Function. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of pain in subjects undergoing confinement is persistent, with varying intensity and frequency based on age, gender, physical activity, and work status. In any of these conditions, the quality of life of the subjects in confinement has been severely affected, which to this day creates a severe public health problem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pain/epidemiology , Public Health , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175581

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the following lockdown on physical exercise (PEx) practice, pain, and psychological well-being. METHODS: A cross-sectional multicentric study was performed using a nonrandom convenience sampling from the general population (≥18 years-old) of 6 countries (Brazil, Italy, France, Portugal, Germany, and Spain) adopting social isolation (SI). The validated self-administered online survey (PEF-COVID19) was used. The tests T-test and Chi-square with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis and a multivariate logistic regression model (p ˂ 0.05). RESULTS: We included 3194 replies and ~80% of the respondents were in SI. Brazilian sample was highly influenced by the pandemic considering PEx practice and habits, pain, anxiety, and stress (p ˂ 0.05). Among the European countries, Italy presented the major changes. The model to predict the non-practice of PEx during SI showed that the variables countries, smoking, SI, and PEx level were significant predictors (p ˂ 0.001). CONCLUSION: The pandemic changed the PEx practice and habits, and the psychological well-being of populations in different manners. Countries, smoking, SI, and PEx level were predictors for the non-practice of PEx. Public health strategies are suggested to avoid sedentary lifestyles and quality of life decrease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Brazil/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe , Exercise , France , Germany , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Portugal , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
17.
Eur J Pain ; 25(6): 1342-1354, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173807

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We assessed whether COVID-19 is associated with de novo pain and de novo chronic pain (CP). METHODS: This controlled cross-sectional study was based on phone interviews of patients discharged from hospital after COVID-19 compared to the control group composed of individuals hospitalized during the same period due to non-COVID-19 causes. Patients were classified as having previous CP based on the ICD-11/IASP criteria, de novo pain (i.e. any new type of pain, irrespective of the pain status before hospital stay), and de novo CP (i.e. persistent or recurring de novo pain, lasting more than 3 months) after COVID-19. We assessed pain prevalence and its characteristics, including headache profile, pain location, intensity, interference, and its relationship with fatigue, and persistent anosmia. Forty-six COVID-19 and 73 control patients were included. Both groups had similar sociodemographic characteristics and past medical history. RESULTS: Length of in-hospital-stay and ICU admission rates were significantly higher amongst COVID-19 survivours, while mechanical ventilation requirement was similar between groups. Pre-hospitalisation pain was lower in COVID-19 compared to control group (10.9% vs. 42.5%; p = 0.001). However, the COVID-19 group had a significantly higher prevalence of de novo pain (65.2% vs. 11.0%, p = 0.001), as well as more de novo headache (39.1%) compared to controls (2.7%, p = 0.001). New-onset CP was 19.6% in COVID-19 patients and 1.4% (p = 0.002) in controls. These differences remained significant (p = 0.001) even after analysing exclusively (COVID: n = 40; controls: n = 34) patients who did not report previous pain before the hospital stay. No statistically significant differences were found for mean new-onset pain intensity and interference with daily activities between both groups. COVID-19 pain was more frequently located in the head/neck and lower limbs (p < 0.05). New-onset fatigue was more common in COVID-19 survivours necessitating inpatient hospital care (66.8%) compared to controls (2.5%, p = 0.001). COVID-19 patients who reported anosmia had more new-onset pain (83.3%) compared to those who did not (48.0%, p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of de novo CP, chronic daily headache, and new-onset pain in general, which was associated with persistent anosmia. SIGNIFICANCE: There exists de novo pain in a substantial number of COVID-19 survivours, and some develop chronic pain. New-onset pain after the infection was more common in patients who reported anosmia after hospital discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Anosmia/epidemiology , Anosmia/virology , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , Survivors
18.
Spine Deform ; 9(4): 1073-1076, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111400

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the pain and functional effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with ASD reflected by their response to SRS-22, ODI, and SF-36 questionnaires. METHODS: Patients who had stable pain and functional outcome scores over the preceding 2 years were enrolled in a local prospectively collected adult spinal deformity (ASD) database. A reanalysis of their SRS22, ODI and SF-36 data 14 days into confinement were compared to their last pre-confinement scores. RESULTS: 89 patients were included in this study (average age 60.7 years, 91% female) with an average time from last FU until confinement of 9.6 months. The ODI total score worsened by 5 points post-confinement with no difference seen in personal care, walking and social life. In contrast, the SRS-22 score showed small improvements in function/activity and satisfaction, but no significant differences for the other domains. Similarly, the SF-36 showed small improvements in physical function, physical and emotional role, vitality and PCS. CONCLUSION: The global COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing confinement had variable overall effects on ASD patients, without the expected marked worsening. In addition, this study illustrates that the SRS-22 questionnaire is less influenced by environmental and psychological factors than the ODI supporting its objectivity and accuracy in the evaluation of the QoL of ASD patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pain/etiology , Quality of Life , Spinal Curvatures/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain/epidemiology , Self Report
19.
Cogn Behav Ther ; 50(6): 466-478, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075404

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel SARS-CoV2 disease causing COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on the world, and those with pain conditions may be at heightened risk for these negative consequences. Given COVID-19 limitations, including social distancing and stay-at-home orders, pain is likely largely going untreated, leading to greater pain and associated consequences. Mental health symptoms, which have been found to be elevated due to COVID-19, may contribute to elevated pain experience, but little work has examined how COVID-19-specific mental health factors may be associated with pain. Therefore, the current study examined (1) how COVID-19-specific psychological factors and general mental health symptoms differ between those with pain and without, and (2) among those with pain, which psychological factors were most strongly associated with pain experience. Results from a national (U.S. based) online sample of 174 adults (42.5% female, Mage = 37.80 years, SD = 11.30, 88 with pain) collected between April and May 2020 indicated that, compared to those individuals reporting no pain, those with pain reported significantly higher values on all variables. Additionally, COVID-19 fear and sleep problems were associated with pain intensity, and for pain-related interference, fear, sleep problems, and depression were significantly associated. These results highlight the potential importance of COVID-19-specific psychological factors in pain experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
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