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1.
Colomb Med (Cali) ; 53(1): e2065115, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146197

ABSTRACT

Aim: We analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on oncology service demand in a middle-income country with universal health coverage. Methods: We collected data from January 1st-2017 to December 31th-2021 at a reference center in Bogotá-Colombia regarding first-time consultations of cross-cutting services (clinical oncology, hematology, palliative care, radiation oncology); specialized multidisciplinary units (breast, prostate, lung, stomach); inpatient and outpatient systemic therapy; radiotherapy; oncology surgery; and bone marrow transplant. A descriptive time series analysis was performed, estimating monthly percent change and endemic channels. Results: Starting the confinement (April 2020), a general decrease in service demand was observed (R: -14.9% to -90.0%), with an additional but lower decrease in August 2020 coinciding with the first pandemic wave (R: -11.3% to -70.0%). Follow-up visits and ambulatory treatment showed no consistent reductions. New patients' consultations for cross-cutting services had a speedy recovery (1 month), but clinical oncology, specialized units, and in-hospital treatment resumed more slowly. Only breast and stomach cancer showed a sustained reduction in early-stage disease. Women and older patients had a more significant reductionin service demand. Conclusion: Despite no changes in service supply, the confinement induced a significant reduction in service demand. Variations by cancer type, service type, and population demographics deserve careful consideration for a suitable response to the emergency. The speedy recovery and the absence of a significant decrease during subsequent waves of the pandemic suggest patient resiliency and a lower impact than expected in middle-income settings in the presence of universal health insurance.


Objetivo: Analizar el impacto de la pandemia de COVID-19 sobre la demanda de servicios oncológicos. Metodos: Se recolectaron datos de enero 1/2017 hasta diciembre 31/2021 de consulta de primera vez en servicios transversales (oncología clinica, hematología, cuidados paliativos, oncología radioterápica) y servicios especializados multidisciplinarios (mama, próstata, pulmón, estómago), así como de suministro de tratamiento (terapia sistémica ambulatoria y hospitalaria, radioterapia, cirugía oncológica, trasplante de médula ósea), en un centro de referencia en Bogotá-Colombia. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de series de tiempo estimando el cambio porcentual mensual y los canales endémicos. Resultados: Al inicio del confinamiento obligatorio (abril/2020) hubo una disminución general en la demanda de servicios transversales (R: -14.9% a -90.0%), con nuevo descenso de menor grado en agosto/2020 durante la primera ola de infecciones (R: -11.3% a -70.0%). Las consultas de seguimiento y tratamientos ambulatorios no mostraron reducciones consistentes. Exceptuando oncología clínica, las consultas de primera vez para servicios transversales tuvieron rápida recuperación hasta cifras basales (1 mes), pero las unidades especializadas y los tratamientos intrahospitalarios tuvieron recuperación mas lenta. Únicamente los cánceres de mama y estómago mostraron una reduccion sostenida de estadios tempranos de la enfermedad. La reducción de la demanda fue mas marcada en mujeres y adultos mayores. Conclusión: A pesar de no tener cambios en la oferta, el confinamiento indujo una reducción significativa en la demanda de servicios oncológicos con variación diferencial por tipo de cáncer, servicio y características demográficas de la población. Esto merece consideración especial para generar respuestas adecuadas a las emergencias sanitarias. La rápida recuperación de la demanda y la ausencia de caídas en olas de infección subsiguientes sugieren resiliencia de los pacientes e impacto menor del esperado en países con cobertura de salud universal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Male , Humans , Female , Universal Health Insurance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Palliative Care , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
2.
JAMA ; 327(4): 325-326, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127404
4.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 96, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100230

ABSTRACT

Background: Education and capacity building in palliative care are greatly needed in Nigeria. Currently, two institutions integrate palliative care into the undergraduate medical curriculum and no post graduate training exists. A team from the University of Lagos in Nigeria and Northwestern University in the US collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a 12-hour virtual palliative care training program for Nigerian health professionals. Objective: This study investigated the impact of the first session of the training program on healthcare professionals' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence in palliative care. Methods: The Education in Palliative and End-of-Life (EPEC) curriculum and the Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) curriculum were used as foundations for the program and adapted for the Nigerian context. Delivered online, the training focused on goals of palliative care, whole patient assessment, communication skills, pain management, psychosocial issues, palliative care in COVID, oncology, and HIV. A mixed-methods evaluation based on Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework was used and data were gathered from surveys and focus groups. Findings: Thirty-five health professionals completed the training. The training had a positive impact on knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Confidence in providing end-of-life care increased from 27.3% to 92.9% while confidence in prescribing medication to relieve symptoms at the end of life increased from 42.9% to 92.0%. Performance on multiple-choice knowledge tests increased by 10% (p < 0.01). All participants stated that they would recommend the program to a peer while 96.4% reported the program was relevant to the Nigerian context. Qualitative analysis suggested that the training would help participants provide more holistic care for patients, communicate better, and change how they interacted with families. Topics to be addressed in future training were identified. Conclusions: This virtual training can be an important element in palliative care capacity building in Nigeria and represents a model for global health collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Palliative Care , Nigeria , Curriculum , Workforce
5.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 147(21): e102-e113, 2022 10.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the research network of German university palliative care centers (PallPan), as part of Network University Medicine (NUM), recommendations for action were developed in regard to the care provided for seriously ill and dying patients during a pandemic. For this purpose, the experiences and needs of hospital staff working closely with patients outside of specialized palliative care units during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic were also examined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nationwide online survey of 8,882 physicians, nurses and therapists working in acute inpatient care in the period from December 2020 to January 2021 by means of a newly developed and piloted questionnaire on changes, burdens and cooperation with specialized palliative care. Grouping based on the changes in the number of seriously ill and dying people in the first wave of the pandemic. Due to the exploratory character of the survey, the data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: 505/8882 completed questionnaires were evaluated (5.7 %). 167/505 (33.1 %) of the respondents reported a lower quality of care for the critically ill and dying. 464/505 (91.8 %) reported exemptions in place for visiting the dying. The most frequently mentioned stress factor was the perceived loneliness of the seriously ill and dying 437/505 (86.5 %), followed by stricter hygiene rules 409/505 (81 %), increased workload 372/505 (73.3 %) and perceived psychological stress on relatives and survivors 395/505 (78.2 %). 141/505 (27.9 %) of respondents used Tablet PCs to support patient-family communication. 310/505 (61.4 %) involved palliative care professionals in patient care, and 356/505 (70.5 %) of respondents found other palliative care services helpful. CONCLUSION: Experiences and suggestions for improving palliative care in pandemic times are integrated into the PallPan recommendations for action. Family visits should be allowed and supplemented by digital offers. Palliative Care should also be integrated into both pandemic and contingency plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Humans , Palliative Care/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hospitals , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(10): 3273-3291, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Recent advances have led to cure or long-term disease control for patients with hematological malignancy (HM). Unfortunately, some of them still have poor prognoses and are often associated with significant symptom burden and poor quality of life for patients and families. These patients usually require supportive care including red blood cell and platelet transfusion, due to disease itself and the oncological treatment, apart from their symptom management. However, there is currently lack of the literatures review in these aspects. The objective of this review is to summarize practical supportive care recommendations for physicians or nurses practicing in palliative care (PC)/hematology-oncology unit, starting with core approaches in use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, management of tumor lysis syndrome, PC and oncology nursing care. METHODS: Evidence for this review was obtained from a search of the Cochrane database, PubMed, guidelines of European Society of Medical Oncology, British society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, National Comprehensive Cancer Network and peer-reviewed journal articles. KEY CONTENT AND FINDINGS: For asymptomatic cancer patients who are anaemic, a threshold of haemoglobin level of 7 g/dL is considered to be safe and generally favored for blood transfusion. 'Single-unit' red cell transfusion is safer and at least as effective as 'double-unit' transfusion. Prophylactic platelet transfusion should be given to stable patients without bleeding and with platelet count less than 10×109/L. In febrile patients, the threshold is lifted to 20×109/L. There are also recommendations for the use of blood products during COVID-19 pandemic. In general, HM patients were more prone to painful infections when compared with solid cancer patients. Thus, antibiotics to treat underlying infections should be applied whenever possible and as required to control pain. CONCLUSIONS: This narrative review showed the recent literatures in the supportive care and symptom management of advanced HM patients. However, it is limited by some of the 'evidence-based' recommendations for interventions (including symptom management) based on early phase of HM populations rather than those receiving end-of-life care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Neoplasms , Humans , Palliative Care , Quality of Life , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 927874, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080283

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospice and palliative care (HPC) aims to improve end-of-life quality and has received much more attention through the lens of an aging population in the midst of the coronavirus disease pandemic. However, several barriers remain in China due to a lack of professional HPC providers with positive behavioral intentions. Therefore, we conducted an original study introducing machine learning to explore individual behavioral intentions and detect factors of enablers of, and barriers to, excavating potential human resources and improving HPC accessibility. Methods: A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate healthcare providers' behavioral intentions, knowledge, attitudes, and practices in hospice care (KAPHC) with an indigenized KAPHC scale. Binary Logistic Regression and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) were performed to model impacting and predict individual behavioral intentions. Results: The RFC showed high sensitivity (accuracy = 0.75; F1 score = 0.84; recall = 0.94). Attitude could directly or indirectly improve work enthusiasm and is the most efficient approach to reveal behavioral intentions. Continuous practice could also improve individual confidence and willingness to provide HPC. In addition, scientific knowledge and related skills were the foundation of implementing HPC. Conclusion: Individual behavioral intention is crucial for improving HPC accessibility, particularly at the initial stage. A well-trained RFC can help estimate individual behavioral intentions to organize a productive team and promote additional policies.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Palliative Care , Supervised Machine Learning
8.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 182, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada in 2016 provided new impetus for improving palliative care. This commitment to improvement included the development of a National Palliative Care Framework and Action Plan. The purpose of this study was to understand the progress made in palliative care since 2016 from the perspective of persons working and volunteering in palliative care and compare geographic differences. METHODS: A digital survey was developed from goals identified in Canada's Palliative Care Framework and Action Plan and administered online using Qualtrics. Participants were recruited through national palliative care organizations. The survey included both quantitative survey items designed to evaluate improvements across 5 domains and 29 items and included open-ended questions about impacts, innovations, and ongoing challenges. Descriptive statistics were generated for survey domains, items, and demographic variables. Geographic differences were compared using Independent-Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Qualitative data was analyzed inductively into themes. RESULTS: One hundred fifty surveys met inclusion criteria and were analysed. Overall, the most improvement was reported in palliative care education and the least improvement was reported in support for family caregivers. Items on which respondents reported the most improvement included healthcare provider education in palliative care, advance care planning, and use of technology. Items on which respondents reported the least improvement were respite for family caregivers, access to bereavement services, and in-home support for family caregivers. Notably, rural participants reported more statistically significant improvements in the domains of education, access, and research and data collection than their urban counterparts. However, rural participants reported less improvement in places to die when home is not preferable. The COVID-19 pandemic was a significant contributor to these perceived improvements and ongoing challenges. CONCLUSION: Canada's Framework and Action Plan sets out a roadmap for improving palliative care in Canada. Participants in this survey noted significant improvements in key areas, a notable accomplishment amidst the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some improvements were a result of greater use of distance technology. Further leveraging these improvements will make an important contribution to solving some of the rural and remote palliative care issues that have arisen from Canada's unique geography.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Canada , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Am J Nurs ; 122(11): 40-45, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077889

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The need for palliative care in our health care system has exponentially increased in the past few years as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the aging population, and the increasing number of people living with serious illnesses. While nurses play a critical role in delivering palliative care, many lack confidence and knowledge, causing practice gaps in the clinical and psychological management of seriously ill patients. The collective burden of the pandemic has demonstrated the importance of palliative care education and training, specifically in communication, symptom management, and continuing education. All nurses, including nursing students, transitioning nurses, and practicing nurses, should be trained to offer generalist (or primary) palliative care, in accordance with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials: Core Competencies for Professional Nursing Education. Provision of holistic, relationship-based, and integrated palliative care for patients and their families is an ethical obligation for all nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing , Humans , Aged , Palliative Care/psychology , Pandemics
10.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 12-13, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074981

ABSTRACT

In a field that strives to care for patients and families together, what can palliative care clinicians do when patients' families are physically absent? The Covid-19 pandemic has put both literal and figurative walls between health care professionals and families. How health care workers respond to these disconnections might have a lasting impact on patients, on families, and on our practice. Recently, I saw this in the case of a patient our palliative care team was consulted to see. Mr. B was minimally responsive and dying from multisystem organ failure of unclear etiology. As in other cases during this pandemic, our team became a facilitator of interaction between the patient and the physically absent family, seeing an intimacy we normally would not, in this case, by being present while our intern held the phone to Mr. B's ear for an end-of-life call from his wife, son, and daughter. Such moments force us clinicians to be even more present for our families and patients, and they allow us to bear witness to the strength and sadness and love that we might otherwise miss.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ethics Consultation , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066091

ABSTRACT

In the midst of COVID-19, radical change in the work environment further exacerbated the detrimental effects of critical illness in the intensive care unit (ICU). This may be heightened if the patient experiences a lamentable end-of-life experience due to inadequate end-of-life care (EoLC). Anchoring on the theory of bureaucratic caring and the peaceful end-of-life theory, insights can be gained into the motivations and behaviors that support the delivery of palliative care during COVID-19. With this having been having said, the objective of this study was to use a narrative approach to examine the lived experience of 12 nurses who provided EoLC in the COVID-19 ward of several hospitals in the Western Philippines. Participants' narratives were transcribed, translated and analyzed. Among the themes that have emerged are: establishing a peaceful journey to death, holistic caring for the end of life, venturing into risky encounters in the call of duty, staying close amidst the reshaped work environment, and preparing the family life after a loved one's departure. The study identified the importance of assisting patients on their journey to a peaceful death, but this journey was also accompanied by a sense of self-preservation and safety for colleagues and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Terminal Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Palliative Care , Philippines , Qualitative Research
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065957

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the care of critically ill and dying patients in isolation wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and regular wards was severely impaired. In order to support physicians in communicative and palliative care skills, an e-learning tool was developed as part of the joint project "Palliative Care in Pandemic Times" (PallPan). This study investigates the feasibility of this e-learning tool. Secondly, we aim to analyze changes in knowledge and attitude upon completion of the e-learning tool. A 38-item questionnaire-based evaluation study with assessment of global and specific outcomes including ICU and non-ICU physicians was performed. In total, 24 questionnaires were included in the anonymous analysis. Feasibility was confirmed by a very high rate of overall satisfaction (94% approval), with relevance reaching 99% approval. Overall, we detected high gains in knowledge and noticeably lower gains on the attitude plane, with the highest gain in naming reasons for incorporating palliative care. The lowest learning gain on the attitude plane was observed when the participants were confronted with their own mortality. This study shows that e-learning is a feasible tool for gaining knowledge and even changing the attitudes of physicians caring for critically ill and dying patients in a self-assessment evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Physicians , Terminal Care , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 176, 2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064782

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Independent charitably funded hospices have been an important element of the UK healthcare response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospices usually have different funding streams, procurement processes, and governance arrangements compared to NHS provision, which may affect their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study is to understand the challenges faced by charitably funded hospices during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Eligible Organisations providing specialist palliative or hospice care completed the online CovPall survey (2020) which explored their response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible organisations were then purposively selected to participate in interviews as part of qualitative case studies (2020-21) to understand challenges in more depth. Free-text responses from the survey were analysed using content analysis and were categorised accordingly. These categorisations were used a priori for a reflexive thematic analysis of interview data. RESULTS: 143 UK independent charitably funded hospices completed the online CovPall survey. Five hospices subsequently participated in qualitative case studies (n = 24 staff interviews). Key themes include: vulnerabilities of funding; infection control during patient care; and bereavement support provision. Interviewees discussed the fragility of income due to fundraising events stopping; the difficulties of providing care to COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients within relatively small organisations; and challenges with maintaining the quality of bereavement services. CONCLUSION: Some unique care and provision challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic were highlighted by charitably funded hospices. Funding core services charitably and independently may affect their ability to respond to pandemics, or scenarios where resources are unexpectedly insufficient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospice Care , Hospices , Humans , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics
14.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 170, 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064780

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Social support is described by patients and other stakeholders to be a valuable component of palliative day care. Less is known about the range of hospice services that have been used in practice that facilitate social support. An online survey aimed to gain an overview of all hospice day services that facilitated social support for adults outside of their own homes. METHODS: An online survey was distributed via email to people involved in managing hospice day services. Questions were asked on hospice characteristics, including staff and volunteer roles. Respondents were asked to identify services they felt offered social support to patients. Data collection took place between August 2017 and May 2018. RESULTS: Responses were received from 103 hospices in the UK and ROI (response rate 49.5%). Results provide an overview of hospice day and outpatient services that offer social support to patients. These are: multi-component interventions, activity groups, formal support groups, befriending, and informal social activities. Multi-component interventions, such as palliative day care, were the most commonly reported. Their stated aims tend to focus on clinical aspects, but many survey respondents considered these multicomponent interventions to be the 'most social' service at their hospice. The survey also identified a huge variety of activity groups, as well as formal therapeutic support groups. Informal 'social-only' activities were present, but less common. Over a third of all the services were described as 'drop in'. Most responding hospices did not routinely use patient reported outcome measures in their 'most social' services. CONCLUSIONS: The survey documents hospice activity in facilitating social support to be diverse and evolving. At the time of data collection, many hospices offered multiple different services by which a patient might obtain social support outside of their own home and in the presence of other patients.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Adult , Humans , Ireland , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
15.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 9(1)2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064180

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting genetic disorder estimated to affect more than 160 000 individuals and their families worldwide. People living with CF commonly experience significant physical and emotional symptom burdens, disruptions to social roles and complex treatment decision making. While palliative care (PC) interventions have been shown to relieve many such burdens in other serious illnesses, no rigorous evidence exists for palliative care in CF. Thus, this study aims to compare the effect of specialist palliative care plus usual CF care vs usual CF care alone on patient quality of life. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a five-site, two-arm, partially masked, randomised superiority clinical trial. 264 adults with CF will be randomly assigned to usual CF care or usual CF care plus a longitudinal palliative care intervention delivered by a palliative care specialist. The trial's primary outcome is patient quality of life (measured with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative care instrument). Secondary outcomes include symptom burden, satisfaction with care and healthcare utilisation. Outcomes will be measured at 12 months (primary endpoint) and 15 months (secondary endpoint). In addition, we will conduct qualitative interviews with patient participants, caregivers, and palliative care and CF care team members to explore perceptions of the intervention's impact and barriers and facilitators to dissemination. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Human subjects research ethics approval was obtained from all participating sites, and all study participants gave informed consent. We will publish the results of this trial in a peer-reviewed journal. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN53323164.


Subject(s)
Cystic Fibrosis , Palliative Care , Adult , Caregivers/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Palliative Care/methods , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
17.
J Palliat Med ; 25(10): 1606-1609, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051226

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic brings with it a significant number of post-COVID symptoms, including persistent dyspnea and neuropsychological sequelae. The palliative approach in the treatment of these refractory symptoms is effective and widely applicable in different settings. We report the case of a patient with refractory dyspnea admitted to a specialized palliative care unit with a very poor prognosis. The application of different tools of the palliative approach proved to be effective: a detailed advanced care planning and open communication, the respect for the patient's wishes and optimal use of his resources-the salutogenesis- an adaptation of the rhythm of care to that of the patient. The patient was then discharged for rehabilitation, and finally returned home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/therapy , Humans , Male , Palliative Care/methods , Prognosis
18.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(4): 309-315, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2037584

ABSTRACT

The number of persons with serious illness in America has dramatically increased over the last half decade, while the cost for health care quadrupled. The trajectory of these chronic conditions can mean declining health, frequent emergency department visits and more hospitalizations, driving up health care costs, and reducing quality of life. Palliative care, a viable solution to reducing disease burden, improving quality of life, and decreasing costs, has been offered in hospitals for many years and is now a standard of care and practice. Palliative care can be provided while concomitantly offering disease-targeted treatment. Home-based and community-based palliative care models offer new and innovative avenues for the provision of palliative care outside the hospital walls. Definitions to differentiate between palliative care, hospice, and long-term services and support will be presented. How to make the business case for home-based or community-based palliative care will be made, with insights, resources, and tools for calculating the return on investment. The role and competencies for palliative care nurse leaders will be explored.


Subject(s)
Hospices , Palliative Care , Emergency Service, Hospital , Health Care Costs , Humans , Quality of Life
19.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 12(4): 439-447, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032545

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe multinational prescribing practices by palliative care services for symptom management in patients dying with COVID-19 and the perceived effectiveness of medicines. METHODS: We surveyed specialist palliative care services, contacted via relevant organisations between April and July 2020. Descriptive statistics for categorical variables were expressed as counts and percentages. Content analysis explored free text responses about symptom management in COVID-19. Medicines were classified using British National Formulary categories. Perceptions on effectiveness of medicines were grouped into five categories; effective, some, limited or unclear effectiveness, no effect. RESULTS: 458 services responded; 277 UK, 85 rest of Europe, 95 rest of the world, 1 missing country. 358 services had managed patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. 289 services had protocols for symptom management in COVID-19. Services tended to prescribe medicines for symptom control comparable to medicines used in people without COVID-19; mainly opioids and benzodiazepines for breathlessness, benzodiazepines and antipsychotics for agitation, opioids and cough linctus for cough, paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fever, and opioids and paracetamol for pain. Medicines were considered to be mostly effective but varied by patient's condition, route of administration and dose. CONCLUSIONS: Services were largely consistent in prescribing for symptom management in people dying with COVID-19. Medicines used prior to COVID-19 were mostly considered effective in controlling common symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Humans , Acetaminophen , Cough , Benzodiazepines
20.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(10): 3130-3131, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029326

Subject(s)
Palliative Care , Humans
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