Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 61
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264260, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reports on medium and long-term sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infections largely lack quantification of incidence and relative risk. We describe the rationale and methods of the Innovative Support for Patients with SARS-CoV-2 Registry (INSPIRE) that combines patient-reported outcomes with data from digital health records to understand predictors and impacts of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: INSPIRE is a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of individuals with symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in eight regions across the US. Adults are eligible for enrollment if they are fluent in English or Spanish, reported symptoms suggestive of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, and if they are within 42 days of having a SARS-CoV-2 viral test (i.e., nucleic acid amplification test or antigen test), regardless of test results. Recruitment occurs in-person, by phone or email, and through online advertisement. A secure online platform is used to facilitate the collation of consent-related materials, digital health records, and responses to self-administered surveys. Participants are followed for up to 18 months, with patient-reported outcomes collected every three months via survey and linked to concurrent digital health data; follow-up includes no in-person involvement. Our planned enrollment is 4,800 participants, including 2,400 SARS-CoV-2 positive and 2,400 SARS-CoV-2 negative participants (as a concurrent comparison group). These data will allow assessment of longitudinal outcomes from SARS-CoV-2 infection and comparison of the relative risk of outcomes in individuals with and without infection. Patient-reported outcomes include self-reported health function and status, as well as clinical outcomes including health system encounters and new diagnoses. RESULTS: Participating sites obtained institutional review board approval. Enrollment and follow-up are ongoing. CONCLUSIONS: This study will characterize medium and long-term sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection among a diverse population, predictors of sequelae, and their relative risk compared to persons with similar symptomatology but without SARS-CoV-2 infection. These data may inform clinical interventions for individuals with sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Palliative Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Prognosis , Registries , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Determinants of Health , Therapies, Investigational/methods , Time Factors , Young Adult
2.
Can J Anaesth ; 67(10): 1417-1423, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777840

ABSTRACT

Symptom management and end-of-life care are core skills for all physicians, although in ordinary times many anesthesiologists have fewer occasions to use these skills. The current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused significant mortality over a short time and has necessitated an increase in provision of both critical care and palliative care. For anesthesiologists deployed to units caring for patients with COVID-19, this narrative review provides guidance on conducting goals of care discussions, withdrawing life-sustaining measures, and managing distressing symptoms.


RéSUMé: La prise en charge des symptômes et les soins de fin de vie sont des compétences de base pour tous les médecins, bien qu'en temps ordinaire, de nombreux anesthésiologistes n'ont que peu d'occasions de mettre en pratique ces compétences. La pandémie actuelle de coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) a provoqué un taux de mortalité significatif dans un court intervalle et a nécessité une augmentation des besoins en soins intensifs et en soins palliatifs. Destiné aux anesthésiologistes déployés dans les unités prenant soin de patients atteints de la COVID-19, ce compte rendu narratif offre des recommandations quant à la façon de mener les discussions à propos des objectifs de soins, du retrait des thérapies de soutien vital, et de la prise en charge de symptômes de détresse.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Terminal Care/organization & administration , Anesthesiologists/organization & administration , Anesthesiologists/standards , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Care/standards , Humans , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Physicians/organization & administration , Physicians/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Terminal Care/standards , Withholding Treatment
5.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(2): 119-125, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199943

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the health and well-being of individuals and communities worldwide. Patients with cancer are particularly vulnerable to experiencing serious health-related suffering from COVID-19. This requires oncology nurses in inpatient and clinic settings to ensure the delivery of primary palliative care while considering the far-reaching implications of this public health crisis. With palliative care skills fully integrated into oncology nursing practice, health organizations and cancer centers will be better equipped to meet the holistic needs of patients with cancer and their families receiving care for serious illness, including improved attention to physical, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual, and ethical considerations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neoplasms/nursing , Oncology Nursing , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Emerg Med J ; 38(5): 371-372, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197268

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented significant challenges to services providing emergency care, in both the community and hospital setting. The Physician Response Unit (PRU) is a Community Emergency Medicine model, working closely with community, hospital and pre-hospital services. In response to the pandemic, the PRU has been able to rapidly introduce novel pathways designed to support local emergency departments (EDs) and local emergency patients. The pathways are (1) supporting discharge from acute medical and older people's services wards into the community; (2) supporting acute oncology services; (3) supporting EDs; (4) supporting palliative care services. Establishing these pathways have facilitated a number of vulnerable patients to access patient-focussed and holistic definitive emergency care. The pathways have also allowed EDs to safely discharge patients to the community, and also mitigate some of the problems associated with trying to maintain isolation for vulnerable patients within the ED. Community Emergency Medicine models are able to reduce ED attendances and hospital admissions, and hence risk of crowding, as well as reducing nosocomial risks for patients who can have high-quality emergency care brought to them. This model may also provide various alternative solutions in the delivery of safe emergency care in the postpandemic healthcare landscape.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Opin Support Palliat Care ; 15(2): 147-153, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177359

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 has permeated the very essence of human existence and society and disrupted healthcare systems. The attrition stemming from this highly contagious disease particularly affects those rendered vulnerable by age and infirmity, including those with underlying cardiovascular disease. This article critically reviews how best to integrate supportive care into the management of those affected. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous studies have described the pathophysiology of COVID-19, including that specifically arising in those with cardiovascular disease. Potential treatment strategies have emerged but there is limited guidance on the provision of palliative care. A framework for implementation of this service needs to be developed, perhaps involving the training of non-specialists to deliver primary palliative care in the community, bolstered by the use of telemedicine. The appropriate use of limited clinical resources has engendered many challenging discussions and complex ethical decisions. Prospective implementation of future policies requires the incorporation of measures to assuage moral distress, burnout and compassion fatigue in healthcare staff who are psychologically and physically exhausted. SUMMARY: Further research based on patient-centred decision making and advance care planning is required to ensure the supportive needs of COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular disease are adequately met. This research should focus on interventions applicable to daily healthcare practice and include strategies to safeguard staff well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Communication , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Advance Care Planning/organization & administration , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/prevention & control , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Cultural Competency , Decision Making , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration
8.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 38(7): 877-882, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals worldwide have reported large volumes of patients with refractory symptoms and a large number of deaths attributable to COVID-19. This has led to an increase in the demand for palliative care beyond what can be provided by most existing programs. We developed a scalable model to enable continued provision of high-quality palliative care during a pandemic for hospitals without a palliative care unit or existing dedicated palliative care beds. METHODS: A COVID-19 consultation service working group (CWG) was convened with stakeholders from palliative care, emergency medicine, critical care, and general internal medicine. The CWG connected with local palliative care teams to ensure a coordinated response, and developed a model to ensure high-quality palliative care provision. RESULTS: Our 3-step scalable model included: (1) consultant model enhanced by virtual care; (2) embedded model; and (3) cohorted end-of-life unit for COVID-19 positive patients. This approach was enabled through tools and resources to ensure specialist palliative care capacity and rapid upskilling of all clinicians to deliver basic palliative care. Enabling tools and resources included a triage tool for in-person versus virtual care, new medication order sets and guidelines to facilitate prescribing for common symptoms, and lead advance care planning and goals of care discussions. A redeployment plan of generalist physicians and psychiatrists was created to ensure seamless provision of serious illness care. CONCLUSION: This 3-step, scalable approach enables rapid upscaling of palliative care in collaboration with generalist physicians, and may be adapted for future pandemics or natural disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Humans , Inpatients
10.
Palliat Support Care ; 19(2): 182-186, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: On October 10, 2020, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Supportive Care Service hosted their first-ever United States (US) World Hospice and Palliative Care Day (WHPCD) Celebration. The purpose of this article is to describe the US inaugural event in alignment with the broader goals of WHPCD and provide lessons learned in anticipation of the second annual conference to be held on October 5-6, 2021. METHODS: Description of the inaugural event in the context of COVID-19 and WHPCD, co-planning conference team reflection, and attendee survey responses. RESULTS: The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance initially launched WHPCD in 2005 as an annual unified day of action to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care around the world. The US-based innovative virtual conference featured 23 interprofessional hospice and palliative care specialists and patient and family caregiver speakers across nine diverse sessions addressing priorities at the intersection of COVID-19, social injustice, and the global burden of serious health-related suffering. Two primary aims guided the event: community building and wisdom sharing. Nearly 270 registrants from at least 16 countries and one dozen states across the US joined the free program focused on both personal and professional development. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Unlike many other academic conferences and professional gatherings that were relegated to online forums due to pandemic-related restrictions, the US WHPCD Celebration was intentionally established to create a virtual coming together for collective reflection on the barriers and facilitators of palliative care delivery amid vast societal change. The goal to ensure a globally relevant and culturally inclusive agenda will continue to draw increased participation at an international level during future annual events. Finally, the transparent and respectful sharing of palliative care team experiences in the year preceding the conference established a safe environment for both individual expression and scholarly discussion.


Subject(s)
Anniversaries and Special Events , Hospice Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing/organization & administration , Hospices/organization & administration , Humans , United States
11.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 130, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106476

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has strained health care systems beyond capacity resulting in many people not having access to life-sustaining measures even in well-resourced countries. Palliative and end-of-life care are therefore essential to alleviate suffering and ensure a continuum of care for patients unlikely to survive. This is challenging in sub-Saharan Africa where lack of trained teams on basic palliative care and reduced access to opioids limit implementation of palliative and end-of-life care. At the same time, health care providers have to cope with local cultural conceptions of death and absence of advance care directives.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Terminal Care/organization & administration , Advance Directives , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Analgesics, Opioid/supply & distribution , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Attitude to Death , COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Culture , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Palliative Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Professional-Patient Relations , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Stigma , Terminal Care/psychology
12.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(4): 316-322, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091177

ABSTRACT

Palliative and end-of-life care has been pushed to the forefront of medical care during the pandemic caused by the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19). Palliative care organizations have responded to the growing demand for the rapid dissemination of research, clinical guidance, and instructions for care to clinicians, patients with COVID-19, and their caregivers by creating COVID-19 resource Web pages. Here, end users can access resources that can be updated in real time. These Web pages, however, can be variable in what resources they offer and for whom they are designed for (clinicians, patients, caregivers). Therefore, this project was conducted to consolidate these resources via summary tables of specific contents available through each Web page grouped by palliative care domains (eg, care discussion and planning, communication, symptom management, care access) and to identify the target audience. This environmental scan was conducted by compiling a comprehensive list of COVID-19 resource Web pages of palliative care organizations generated by reviewing previously published research studies and consulting with palliative care research experts. Snowballing techniques were used to identify resource Web pages not captured in the initial scan. Two reviewers independently evaluated eligible Web pages for content via a form developed for the study, and Cohen κ statistic was calculated to ensure interrater reliability. The final κ statistic was 0.76. Of the 24 websites screened, 15 websites met our eligibility criteria. Among the eligible resource Web pages, most (n = 12, 80%) had specific target audiences and care settings, whereas the rest presented information targeted to all audiences. Although 11 Web pages offered resources that addressed all 4 domains, only 1 Web page conveyed all 12 subdomains. We recommend the use of this guide to all frontline clinicians who require guidance in clinically managing patients with COVID-19 receiving palliative care and/or end-of-life care.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning/organization & administration , Bibliographies as Topic , Hospice Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Terminal Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 62-77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085398

ABSTRACT

The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City was in the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic and had to transform from a tertiary to crisis care hospital and increase its bed capacity by 50 percent to care for COVID-19 patients. The size, scope, complexity and uncertainty of this crisis was unparalleled. This article describes the comprehensive response of the Department of Social Work Services, one of the largest hospital social work departments in the country. The response was informed by four Departmental principles, as well as crisis intervention strategies. This article describes organizational structures, practice models, policies, and protocols developed to respond quickly and effectively, given infection prevention mandates, to patient, population and workforce needs. Finally, it includes how social workers addressed COVID-19 related physical and psychosocial needs and applied and modified interprofessional communication and collaboration. Lessons learned and clinical and administrative changes that will assist in navigating "new normal" operations are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Leadership , Social Work Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Social Work/organization & administration , Communication , Cooperative Behavior , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Interprofessional Relations , New York City/epidemiology , Occupational Health , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vulnerable Populations
14.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 49-61, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072244

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the systemic inequities in our health care system and society has called for actions to meet the clinical, psychosocial and educational needs in health care settings and communities. In this paper we describe how an organized Department of Health Social Work in a medical school played a unique role in responding to the challenges of a pandemic with community, clinical, and educational initiatives that were integral to our community's health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Leadership , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Work/organization & administration , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Food Supply/methods , Health Status , Hotlines/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Mental Health , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
15.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 93-105, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069152

ABSTRACT

Social workers and nurses, as members of interprofessional palliative medicine teams, faced unfamiliar challenges and opportunities as they endeavored to provide humanistic care to patients and families during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Typical methods for engaging patients and families in medical decision-making became thwarted by visitation restrictions and patients' dramatic health declines. This paper presents an innovative social work and nursing intervention aimed at enhancing humanistic patient/family care and advanced directive dialogs. Through incorporating a narrative synthesis of the teams' reflective journals from COVID-19, the paper chronicles the intervention implementation, patient/family responses, and team members' personal and professional meaning-making processes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Social Work/organization & administration , Trauma Centers/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 7: 162-172, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060222

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected healthcare systems globally, leading to reorganization of medical activities. We performed an international survey aimed to investigate the medium- and long-term impact on oncology units. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An 82-item survey was distributed from June 17 to July 14, 2020 among medical oncologists worldwide. RESULTS: One hundred nine medical oncologists from 18 countries in Europe (n = 93), United States (n = 5), and Latin America (n = 11) answered the survey. A systematic tracing of COVID-19-positive patients was continued in the postacute phase by 77.1% of the centers; 64.2% of the respondents participated in a local registry and 56% in international or national registries of infected patients. Treatment adaptations were introduced, and surgery was the most affected modality being delayed or canceled in more than 10% of patients in 34% of the centers, whereas early cessation of palliative treatment was reported in 32.1% of the centers; 64.2% of respondents reported paying attention to avoid undertreatments. The use of telemedicine has been largely increased. Similarly, virtual tools are increasingly used particularly for medical education and international or national or multidisciplinary meetings. 60.6% of the participants reduced clinical activity, and 28.4% compensated by increasing their research activity. Significant reduction of clinical trial activities is expected in 37% of centers this year. The well-being of healthcare staff would not recover by the end of the year according to 18% of the participants. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 outbreak has had a major impact on oncologic activity, which will persist in the future, irrespective of geographical areas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Adult , Clinical Trials as Topic , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Geography , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Internet , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Registries , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , United States/epidemiology
17.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(4): 1713-1718, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043511

ABSTRACT

This paper chronicles the third decade of MASCC from 2010. There was a generational change in this decade, building on the solid foundation of the founders. It included the first female President, and a new Executive Director with a background in strategy and business development and operations as applied to healthcare. The headquarters moved from Copenhagen to Toronto. The first meeting to be held outside of Europe or North America was held in Adelaide, Australia, and the membership in the Asia Pacific region expanded. A program of international affiliates saw national supportive care organisations formally link with MASCC. In cancer supportive care, there was a raft of new toxicities to manage as immunotherapies were added to conventional cytotoxic treatment. There was also a greater emphasis on the psychosocial needs of patients and families. New MASCC groups were formed to respond to this evolution in cancer management. The MASCC journal, Supportive Care in Cancer, continued to grow in impact, and MASCC published two editions of a textbook of supportive care and survivorship. The decade ended with the challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic, but that served to highlight the importance of good supportive care to patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care/history , Palliative Care/trends , Societies, Medical/history , COVID-19/epidemiology , Congresses as Topic/history , Congresses as Topic/trends , Governing Board/history , Governing Board/trends , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , International Agencies/history , International Agencies/organization & administration , International Agencies/standards , International Agencies/trends , International Cooperation/history , Neoplasms/history , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Publications/history , Publications/trends , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Societies, Medical/organization & administration , Societies, Medical/standards , Societies, Medical/trends
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL