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1.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(8): 1094-1103, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405472

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: About 14% of COVID-19 patients experience severe symptoms and require hospitalization. Managing these patients could be challenging for limited-resource countries, such as Palestine. This study aimed to evaluate hospitalized severe COVID-19 patients' treatment outcomes managed with supportive care and steroids. METHODOLOGY: This was a single-center observational retrospective cohort study that enrolled COVID-19 patients admitted to the "Martyrs medical military complex- COVID Hospital" in Palestine. The managing physicians manually collected data through chart reviews, including patients' characteristics, complications, outcomes, and different management modalities. Continuous and categorical variables between those who were discharged alive and who died were compared using t-test and Chi-squares test, respectively. RESULTS: Overall, 334 patients were included in this study. Median (IQR) age was 62(11) years, 49.1% were males, and 29.6% were ICU status patients. The median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 76 (67), and 67.6% of these patients had moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 4.8% of the patients received invasive mechanical ventilation. Most of the patients (78.7%) had at least one comorbidity, and 18.3% developed at least one complication. The overall mortality was 12.3% (95% CI 8.9-16.2%), and the median (IQR) length of hospital stay was 11 (8) days. Age (aOR 1.05, p = 0.08), smoking (aOR 4.12, p = 0.019), IMV (aOR 27.4, p < 0.001) and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (aOR 1.03, p < 0.001) were found to predict higher mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Supportive care for patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia in a Palestinian hospital with limited resources was associated with in-hospital mortality of 12.3%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Developing Countries , Health Resources , Hospital Mortality , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/standards , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies
2.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(5): 455-461, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328958

ABSTRACT

This discussion article highlights the challenges of providing hospice care in nursing homes since the start of the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic and illuminates practice changes needed in nursing homes. The article provides an overview of the expectations of hospice care, explains the differences in delivering hospice care during the COVID-19 pandemic, examines social isolation and emotional loneliness and the role of familial caregivers, and describes policy changes related to the COVID-19 affecting hospice care delivery in nursing homes. This article answers the following questions: (1) How did residents receiving hospice care have their needs met during the COVID-19 pandemic? (2) What areas of nursing home care need to be improved through governmental policy and restructuring? This article also summarized the lessons learned as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and provided practical implications for nursing, specific to changes in hospice care deliveries for nursing home residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospice Care/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Hospice Care/organization & administration , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Needs Assessment , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology
3.
J Healthc Qual Res ; 36(3): 156-159, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099180

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has generated a mortality rate 10times higher than normal influenza according to the World Health Organization (WHO), yet they do not mention palliative care in their action guidelines on maintaining essential health services during this crisis. The aim of this study was to analyse the death process of patients who died from SARS-CoV-2 at the Hospital Costa del Sol. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional study of the period in which all patients who died of SARS-CoV-2 from February to April 2020 were analysed. Sociodemographic characteristics, sample characterization and a set of variables related to the death process were collected in the death event. RESULTS: A total of 16 deaths were recorded out of a total of 103 admissions positive for SARS-CoV-2. Limitation of therapeutic effort was decided in 68.8% of the patients, and admission to the intensive care unit was refused in 56.3%. Support devices had not been removed in any of the cases on the day of death, 43.8% had palliative sedation, and 18.8% were in induced coma. CONCLUSIONS: Quality standards were maintained in the death process in patients who died from SARS-CoV-2, although there were aspects that could be improved. Palliative care is an essential component of the response to SARS-CoV-2 that must be incorporated into all health care settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Death , Palliative Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/methods , Advance Care Planning , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coma/chemically induced , Comorbidity , Critical Care/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Parenteral Nutrition , Patient Isolation , Respiration, Artificial , Resuscitation , Socioeconomic Factors , Spain/epidemiology , Terminal Care/statistics & numerical data , Visitors to Patients , Withholding Treatment
4.
Cancer Med ; 9(24): 9193-9204, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938402

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 outbreak started, it has been affecting mainly older individuals. Among the most vulnerable older individuals are those with cancer. Many published guidelines and consensus papers deal with prioritizing cancer care. Given the lack of high-quality evidence for management of cancer in older patients also in normal times, it is even more stringent to provide some resources on how to avoid both undertreatment and overtreatment in this population, who as of now is twice challenged to death, due to both a greater risk of getting infected with COVID-19 as well as from cancer not adequately addressed and treated. We hereby discuss some general recommendations (implement triage procedures; perform geriatric assessment; carefully assess comorbidity; promote early integration of palliative care in oncology; acknowledge the role of caregivers; maintain active take in charge to avoid feeling of abandonment; mandate seasonal flu vaccination) and discuss practical suggestions for specific disease settings (early-stage and advanced-stage disease for solid tumors, and hematological malignancies). The manuscript provides resources on how to avoid both undertreatment and overtreatment in older patients with cancer, who as of now is twice challenged to death, due to both a greater risk of getting infected with COVID-19 as well as from cancer not adequately addressed and treated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers/standards , Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Disease Outbreaks , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/standards , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(11): 647-651, 2020 11.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934378

ABSTRACT

With the conversion of law decree no. 34 of 19 May 2020, bearing urgent measures concerning health, support to work and the economy, as well as social policies related to CoViD-19 epidemiological emergency, thanks to the approval of an amendment to legislative decree "Rilancio" signed by Giorgio Trizzino, the Specialization school in medicine and palliative care will be established starting from a.y. 2021-2022. Additionally, a course in pediatric palliative care will be introduced in pediatrics specialization schools. The news has been welcomed with enthusiasm by the scientific community and the main stakeholders, some of which have made a strong contribution to this result: the Italian Society for Palliative Care, the Italian Federation for Palliative Care, the Maruzza Levebvre d'Ovidio Foundation, as well as the many professionals, institutions, and NPOs that have been supporting for the past forty years the progress of palliative care in Italy. An assessment of the impact of such a measure and its effects entails due process and contextualization in different areas: first of all, that of demand and current supply, followed by the historical-cultural, the social, and the normative.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Continuing/legislation & jurisprudence , Palliative Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Pediatrics/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Strahlenther Onkol ; 196(12): 1068-1079, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754691

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 infection has manifested as a major threat to both patients and healthcare providers around the world. Radiation oncology institutions (ROI) deliver a major component of cancer treatment, with protocols that might span over several weeks, with the result of increasing susceptibility to COVID-19 infection and presenting with a more severe clinical course when compared with the general population. The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the impact of ROI protocols and performance on daily practice in the high-risk cancer patients during this pandemic. METHODS: We addressed the incidence of positive COVID-19 cases in both patients and health care workers (HCW), in addition to the protective measures adopted in ROIs in Germany, Austria and Switzerland using a specific questionnaire. RESULTS: The results of the questionnaire showed that a noteworthy number of ROIs were able to complete treatment in SARS-CoV­2 positive cancer patients, with only a short interruption. The ROIs reported a significant decrease in patient volume that was not impacted by the circumambient disease incidence, the type of ROI or the occurrence of positive cases. Of the ROIs 16.5% also reported infected HCWs. About half of the ROIs (50.5%) adopted a screening program for patients whereas only 23.3% also screened their HCWs. The range of protective measures included the creation of working groups, instituting home office work and protection with face masks. Regarding the therapeutic options offered, curative procedures were performed with either unchanged or moderately decreased schedules, whereas palliative or benign radiotherapy procedures were more often shortened. Most ROIs postponed or cancelled radiation treatment for benign indications (88.1%). The occurrence of SARS-CoV­2 infections did not affect the treatment options for curative procedures. Non-university-based ROIs seemed to be more willing to change their treatment options for curative and palliative cases than university-based ROIs. CONCLUSION: Most ROIs reported a deep impact of SARS-CoV­2 infections on their work routine. Modification and prioritization of treatment regimens and the application of protective measures preserved a well-functioning radiation oncology service and patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Appointments and Schedules , Austria/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Comorbidity , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitals, Community , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/organization & administration , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Masks/supply & distribution , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Risk , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Teleworking/statistics & numerical data
11.
Palliat Med ; 34(9): 1256-1262, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients hospitalised with COVID-19 have increased morbidity and mortality, which requires extensive involvement of specialist Hospital Palliative Care Teams. Evaluating the response to the surge in demand for effective symptom management can enhance provision of Palliative Care in this patient population. AIM: To characterise the symptom profile, symptom management requirements and outcomes of hospitalised COVID-19 positive patients referred for Palliative Care, and to contextualise Palliative Care demands from COVID-19 against a 'typical' caseload from 2019. DESIGN: Service evaluation based on a retrospective cohort review of patient records. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: One large health board in Scotland. Demographic data, patient symptoms, drugs/doses for symptom control, and patient outcomes were captured for all COVID-19 positive patients referred to Hospital Palliative Care Teams between 30th March and 26th April 2020. RESULTS: Our COVID-19 cohort included 186 patients (46% of all referrals). Dyspnoea and agitation were the most prevalent symptoms (median 2 symptoms per patient). 75% of patients were prescribed continuous subcutaneous infusion for symptom control, which was effective in 78.6% of patients. Compared to a 'typical' caseload, the COVID-19 cohort were on caseload for less time (median 2 vs 5 days; p < 0.001) and had a higher death rate (80.6% vs 30.3%; p < 0.001). The COVID-19 cohort replaced 'typical' caseload; overall numbers of referrals were not increased. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalised COVID-19 positive patients referred for Palliative Care may have a short prognosis, differ from 'typical' caseload, and predominantly suffer from dyspnoea and agitation. Such symptoms can be effectively controlled with standard doses of opioids and benzodiazepines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotland/epidemiology
12.
Palliat Med ; 34(9): 1241-1248, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690363

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care services face challenges in adapting and responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding how palliative care needs and outcomes have changed during the pandemic compared to before the pandemic is crucial to inform service planning and research initiatives. AIM: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on symptoms, clinical characteristics, and outcomes for patients referred to a hospital-based palliative care service in a district general hospital in London, UK. DESIGN: A retrospective service evaluation. Data were extracted from the electronic patient records. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The first 60 inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 infection, referred to the hospital palliative care service between 1 March 2020 and 23 April 2020, and another 60 inpatients, referred to the hospital palliative care service between 11 March 2019 and 23 April 2019, were included from a district general hospital in East London, UK. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 have lower comorbidity scores, poorer performance status, and a shorter time from referral to death compared to patients without COVID-19. Breathlessness, drowsiness, agitation, and fever are the most prevalent symptoms during COVID-19 compared to pain and drowsiness pre-COVID-19. Time from admission to referral to palliative care is longer for Black, Asian and minority ethnic patients, especially during COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Early referral to palliative care is essential in COVID-19, especially for Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups. There is urgent need to research why Black, Asian and minority ethnic patients are referred late; how palliative care services have changed; and possible solutions to setting up responsive, flexible, and integrated services.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , London , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
13.
Palliat Med ; 34(9): 1249-1255, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The literature contains limited information on the problems faced by dying patients with COVID-19 and the effectiveness of interventions to manage these. AIM: The aim of this audit was to assess the utility of our end-of-life care plan, and specifically the effectiveness of our standardised end-of-life care treatment algorithms, in dying patients with COVID-19. DESIGN: The audit primarily involved data extraction from the end-of-life care plan, which includes four hourly nursing (ward nurses) assessments of specific problems: patients with problems were managed according to standardised treatment algorithms, and the intervention was deemed to be effective if the problem was not present at subsequent assessments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: This audit was undertaken at a general hospital in England, covered the 8 weeks from 16 March to 11 May 2020 and included all inpatients with COVID-19 who had an end-of-life care plan (and died). RESULTS: Sixty-one patients met the audit criteria: the commonest problem was shortness of breath (57.5%), which was generally controlled with conservative doses of morphine (10-20 mg/24 h via a syringe pump). Cough and audible respiratory secretions were relatively uncommon. The second most common problem was agitation/delirium (55.5%), which was generally controlled with standard pharmacological interventions. The cumulative number of patients with shortness of breath, agitation and audible respiratory secretions increased over the last 72 h of life, but most patients were symptom controlled at the point of death. CONCLUSION: Patients dying of COVID-19 experience similar end-of-life problems to other groups of patients. Moreover, they generally respond to standard interventions for these end-of-life problems.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Delirium/drug therapy , Drug Therapy/standards , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Hospice Care/standards , Palliative Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Terminal Care/standards , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Drug Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospice Care/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Morphine/therapeutic use , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
14.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e925047, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689085

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and compare these parameters in an elderly group with those in a younger group. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective, single-center observational study included 69 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China, between January 14, 2020, and February 26, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as treatments, complications, and outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) and younger patients (aged <60 years). Patients were followed until March 19, 2020. RESULTS Elderly patients had more complications than younger patients, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 9/25, 36% vs. 5/44, 11.4%) and cardiac injury (7/25, 28% vs. 1/44, 2.3%), and they were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (6/25, 24% vs. 2/44, 4.5%). As of March 19, 2020, 60/69 (87%) of the patients had been discharged, 6/69 (8.7%) had died, and 3/69 (4.3%) remained in the hospital. Of those who were discharged or died, the median duration of hospitalization was 13.5 days (interquartile range, 10-18 days). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients with confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to develop ARDS and cardiac injury than younger patients and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring and respiratory support, cardiac monitoring and supportive care should be a focus in elderly patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
15.
Palliat Med ; 34(9): 1228-1234, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-653470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a substantial mortality risk with increased rates in the elderly. We hypothesized that age is not sufficient, and that frailty measured by preadmission Palliative Performance Scale would be a predictor of outcomes. Improved ability to identify high-risk patients will improve clinicians' ability to provide appropriate palliative care, including engaging in shared decision-making about life-sustaining therapies. AIM: To evaluate whether preadmission Palliative Performance Scale predicts mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study of patients admitted with COVID-19. Palliative Performance Scale was calculated from the chart. Using logistic regression, Palliative Performance Scale was assessed as a predictor of mortality controlling for demographics, comorbidities, palliative care measures and socioeconomic status. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Patients older than 18 years of age admitted with COVID-19 to a single urban public hospital in New Jersey, USA. RESULTS: Of 443 admitted patients, we determined the Palliative Performance Scale score for 374. Overall mortality was 31% and 81% in intubated patients. In all, 36% (134) of patients had a low Palliative Performance Scale score. Compared with patients with a high score, patients with a low score were more likely to die, have do not intubate orders and be discharged to a facility. Palliative Performance Scale independently predicts mortality (odds ratio 2.89; 95% confidence interval 1.42-5.85). CONCLUSIONS: Preadmission Palliative Performance Scale independently predicts mortality in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Improved predictors of mortality can help clinicians caring for patients with COVID-19 to discuss prognosis and provide appropriate palliative care including decisions about life-sustaining therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Frail Elderly/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , New Jersey/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 844-851, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607188

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed a unique challenge to oncology patients and their treatment. There is no study related to the patients' preference for systemic therapy during this pandemic. We have conducted a prospective study to analyze that aspect. METHODS: All consecutive patients who visited during the lockdown period from April 1-10, 2020, for systemic chemotherapy were included in the study for a questionnaire-based survey to evaluate the willingness to continue chemotherapy during this pandemic and factors influencing the decisions. RESULTS: A total of 302 patients were included (median age, 56 years; range, 21-77 years). Most common sites of cancer were breast (n = 114), lung (n = 44), ovary (n = 34), and colon (n = 20). Home address was within the city for 125 patients (42%), outside the city for 138 (46%), and outside the state for 37 (12%). Treatment was curative in 150 patients and palliative in 152. Educational status was primary and above for 231 patients and no formal schooling for 71. A total of 203 patients wanted to continue chemotherapy, 40 wanted to defer, and 56 wanted the physician to decide. Knowledge about COVID-19 strongly correlated with intent of treatment (P = .01), disease status (P = .02), knowledge about immunosuppression (P < .001), home location (P = .02), and education status (P = .003). The worry about catching SARS-CoV-2 was high in those with controlled disease (P = .06) and knowledge about immunosuppression (P = .02). Worry about disease progression was more with palliative intent (P < .001). CONCLUSION: This study shows that oncology patients in our country are more worried about disease progression than the SARS-CoV-2 and wish to continue chemotherapy during this pandemic. The treatment guidelines in the COVID-19 scenario should incorporate patients' perspectives.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Immunotherapy/standards , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Immunotherapy/methods , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/psychology , Palliative Care/psychology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Patient Preference/psychology , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
18.
Palliat Med ; 34(7): 889-895, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-141535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care is an important component of health care in pandemics, contributing to symptom control, psychological support, and supporting triage and complex decision making. AIM: To examine preparedness for, and impact of, the COVID-19 pandemic on hospices in Italy to inform the response in other countries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey, in March 2020. SETTING: Italian hospices, purposively sampled according to COVID-19 regional prevalence categorised as high (>25), medium (15-25) and low prevalence (<15) COVID-19 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. A brief questionnaire was developed to guide the interviews. Analysis was descriptive. RESULTS: Seven high, five medium and four low prevalence hospices provided data. Two high prevalence hospices had experienced COVID-19 cases among both patients and staff. All hospices had implemented policy changes, and several had rapidly implemented changes in practice including transfer of staff from inpatient to community settings, change in admission criteria and daily telephone support for families. Concerns included scarcity of personal protective equipment, a lack of hospice-specific guidance on COVID-19, anxiety about needing to care for children and other relatives, and poor integration of palliative care in the acute planning response. CONCLUSION: The hospice sector is capable of responding flexibly and rapidly to the COVID-19 pandemic. Governments must urgently recognise the essential contribution of hospice and palliative care to the COVID-19 pandemic and ensure these services are integrated into the health care system response. Availability of personal protective equipment and setting-specific guidance is essential. Hospices may also need to be proactive in connecting with the acute pandemic response.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Hospices/organization & administration , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Professional Role , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospices/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
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