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1.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(13-14): 891-893, 2021 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307352

ABSTRACT

During COVID 19 pandemic patients typically present with respiratory symptoms. However, in a significant number of patients the gastrointestinal tract is also involved in the disease. Up to 20 % of patients suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms. New insights in pathophysiological aspects might open new therapeutic concepts. This up-date includes current data regarding epidemiology of gastrointestinal symptoms in COVID 19, its role for prognosis and specific risks in relation to immunosuppressive therapies and underlying diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/virology , Pancreatic Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Humans , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Neurogastroenterol Motil ; 33(3): e14104, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with gastrointestinal and hepatic manifestation in up to one fifth of patients. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiologic agent of COVID-19, infects gastrointestinal epithelial cells expressing angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors triggering a cascade of events leading to mucosal and systemic inflammation. Symptomatic patients display changes in gut microbiota composition and function which may contribute to intestinal barrier dysfunction and immune activation. Evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 infection and related mucosal inflammation impact on the function of the enteric nervous system and the activation of sensory fibers conveying information to the central nervous system, which, may at least in part, contribute symptom generation such as vomiting and diarrhea described in COVID-19. Liver and pancreas dysfunctions have also been described as non-respiratory complications of COVID-19 and add further emphasis to the common view of SARS-CoV-2 infection as a systemic disease with multiorgan involvement. PURPOSE: The aim of this review was to highlight the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal SARS-CoV-2 infection, including the crosstalk with the gut microbiota, the fecal-oral route of virus transmission, and the potential interaction of the virus with the enteric nervous system. We also review the current available data on gastrointestinal and liver manifestations, management, and outcomes of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Gastrointestinal Tract/physiopathology , Animals , Diarrhea/etiology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Diarrhea/virology , Dysbiosis/etiology , Dysbiosis/physiopathology , Dysbiosis/virology , Enteric Nervous System/physiopathology , Enteric Nervous System/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Humans , Liver Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Liver Diseases/virology , Pancreatic Diseases/etiology , Pancreatic Diseases/physiopathology , Pancreatic Diseases/virology
3.
Nat Metab ; 3(2): 149-165, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065968

ABSTRACT

Infection-related diabetes can arise as a result of virus-associated ß-cell destruction. Clinical data suggest that the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), impairs glucose homoeostasis, but experimental evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect pancreatic tissue has been lacking. In the present study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 infects cells of the human exocrine and endocrine pancreas ex vivo and in vivo. We demonstrate that human ß-cells express viral entry proteins, and SARS-CoV-2 infects and replicates in cultured human islets. Infection is associated with morphological, transcriptional and functional changes, including reduced numbers of insulin-secretory granules in ß-cells and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In COVID-19 full-body postmortem examinations, we detected SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein in pancreatic exocrine cells, and in cells that stain positive for the ß-cell marker NKX6.1 and are in close proximity to the islets of Langerhans in all four patients investigated. Our data identify the human pancreas as a target of SARS-CoV-2 infection and suggest that ß-cell infection could contribute to the metabolic dysregulation observed in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Islets of Langerhans/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cells, Cultured , Diabetes Mellitus , Female , Humans , Islets of Langerhans/cytology , Islets of Langerhans/physiopathology , Male , Pancreas, Exocrine/cytology , Pancreas, Exocrine/physiopathology , Pancreas, Exocrine/virology , Pancreatic Diseases/etiology , Pancreatic Diseases/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication
4.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 68(12): 58-60, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-946702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 2019) outbreak caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may cause multisystem dysfunction. We studied pancreatic injury (serum amylase and serum lipase levels) in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 42 COVID-19 patients (diagnosed by real-time PCR) admitted to a tertiary care hospital was conducted. Serum amylase and serum lipase levels were analysed in relation to severity of COVID-19 and mortality. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was 50 ± 16 years, with male to female ratio of 3.7:1. Serum amylase was elevated in 14 patients (33%). Serum lipase was elevated in 7 out of 29 patients (24.1%). Mortality was seen in 18 patients (42.8%). Serum amylase or lipase did not correlate with severity of COVID-19 or its mortality. However, both patients who had high lipase (>3times) died. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of hyperamylasemia in patients of COVID-19 was 33%, while that of elevated lipase was 24.1%. Pancreatic injury failed to show any statistically significant relation to severity or outcome of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pancreas , Pancreatic Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pancreatic Diseases/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Rev Esp Enferm Dig ; 112(11): 891, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895782

ABSTRACT

Apart from the mechanisms reported by Fernandes et al, the thromboembolic pathogenesis should also be taken into account in patients with severe COVID-19 and prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pancreatic Diseases/virology , Thromboembolism/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Pancreatic Diseases/diagnosis , Pancreatic Diseases/physiopathology , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/physiopathology
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