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1.
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr ; 45(S2): 41-46, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568209

ABSTRACT

Advances in treatment of malignancy including novel pharmacologic therapies and surgical interventions has led to significant improvement in survival. As cancer becomes a chronic disease, nutrition interventions play an increasingly important role in short- and long-term outcomes. The current manuscript presents a case of a 66-year-old male with new diagnosis of pancreatic cancer diagnosed incidentally in the setting of COVID-19. Expert panelists in the field of nutrition discuss optimal strategies for diagnosis of malnutrition along with preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative optimization of nutrition. This discussion focuses on the use of probiotics, immune-modulating nutrition, fish oil, specialized proresolving mediators, and use of enteral and parenteral nutrition support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nutrition Disorders , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Nutrition Disorders/therapy , Pancreatic Neoplasms/complications , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Parenteral Nutrition , SARS-CoV-2
3.
HPB (Oxford) ; 23(11): 1656-1665, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525798

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic presented healthcare providers with an extreme challenge to provide cancer services. The impact upon the diagnostic and treatment capacity to treat pancreatic cancer is unclear. This study aimed to identify national variation in treatment pathways during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was distributed to all United Kingdom pancreatic specialist centres, to assess diagnostic, therapeutic and interventional services availability, and alterations in treatment pathways. A repeating methodology enabled assessment over time as the pandemic evolved. RESULTS: Responses were received from all 29 centres. Over the first six weeks of the pandemic, less than a quarter of centres had normal availability of diagnostic pathways and a fifth of centres had no capacity whatsoever to undertake surgery. As the pandemic progressed services have gradually improved though most centres remain constrained to some degree. One third of centres changed their standard resectable pathway from surgery-first to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Elderly patients, and those with COPD were less likely to be offered treatment during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the capacity of the NHS to provide diagnostic and staging investigations for pancreatic cancer. The impact of revised treatment pathways has yet to be realised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(11): 1021-1032, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463067

ABSTRACT

Up to 10% of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) carry underlying germline pathogenic variants in cancer susceptibility genes. The GENetic Education Risk Assessment and TEsting (GENERATE) study aimed to evaluate novel methods of genetic education and testing in relatives of patients with PDAC. Eligible individuals had a family history of PDAC and a relative with a germline pathogenic variant in APC, ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDKN2A, EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PALB2, PMS2, STK11, or TP53 genes. Participants were recruited at six academic cancer centers and through social media campaigns and patient advocacy efforts. Enrollment occurred via the study website (https://GENERATEstudy.org) and all participation, including collecting a saliva sample for genetic testing, could be done from home. Participants were randomized to one of two remote methods that delivered genetic education about the risks of inherited PDAC and strategies for surveillance. The primary outcome of the study was uptake of genetic testing. From 5/8/2019 to 5/6/2020, 49 participants were randomized to each of the intervention arms. Overall, 90 of 98 (92%) of randomized participants completed genetic testing. The most frequently detected pathogenic variants included those in BRCA2 (N = 15, 17%), ATM (N = 11, 12%), and CDKN2A (N = 4, 4%). Participation in the study remained steady throughout the onset of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Preliminary data from the GENERATE study indicate success of remote alternatives to traditional cascade testing, with genetic testing rates over 90% and a high rate of identification of germline pathogenic variant carriers who would be ideal candidates for PDAC interception approaches. PREVENTION RELEVANCE: Preliminary data from the GENERATE study indicate success of remote alternatives for pancreatic cancer genetic testing and education, with genetic testing uptake rates over 90% and a high rate of identification of germline pathogenic variant carriers who would be ideal candidates for pancreatic cancer interception.


Subject(s)
BRCA1 Protein/genetics , BRCA2 Protein/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Testing/methods , Germ-Line Mutation , Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics , Risk Assessment/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/genetics , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/pathology , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Genetic , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Participation , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
6.
Eur J Cancer ; 144: 200-214, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987581

ABSTRACT

Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a heterogeneous family of uncommon tumours with challenging diagnosis, clinical management and unique needs that almost always requires a multidisciplinary approach. In the absence of guidance from the scientific literature, along with the rapidly changing data available on the effect of COVID-19, we report how 12 high-volume NEN centres of expertise in 10 countries at different stages of the evolving COVID-19 global pandemic along with members of international neuroendocrine cancer patient societies have suggested to preserve high standards of care for patients with NENs. We review the multidisciplinary management of neuroendocrine neoplasms during the COVID-19 pandemic, and we suggest potential strategies to reduce risk and aid multidisciplinary treatment decision-making. By sharing our joint experiences, we aim to generate recommendations for proceeding to other institutions facing the same challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoid Tumor/therapy , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/standards , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Carcinoid Tumor/diagnosis , Consensus , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Thoracic Neoplasms/diagnosis
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