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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 23(1): 381, 2023 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a mutual influence between COVID-19, diabetes ketoacidosis, and acute pancreatitis, with clinical manifestations overlapping each other, which can lead to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment that could aggravate the condition and affect the prognosis. COVID-19-induced diabetes ketoacidosis and acute pancreatitis are extremely rare, with only four case reports in adults and no cases yet reported in children. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a case of acute pancreatitis associated with diabetic ketoacidosis in a 12-year-old female child post novel coronavirus infection. The patient presented with vomiting, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, and confusion. Laboratory findings showed elevated levels of inflammatory markers, hypertriglyceridemia, and high blood glucose. The patient was treated with fluid resuscitation, insulin, anti-infection treatments, somatostatin, omeprazole, low-molecular-weight heparin, and nutritional support. Blood purification was administered to remove inflammatory mediators. The patient's symptoms improved, and blood glucose levels stabilized after 20 days of admission. CONCLUSION: The case highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the interrelated and mutually promoting conditions of COVID-19, diabetes ketoacidosis, and acute pancreatitis among clinicians, to reduce misdiagnosis and missed diagnoses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Ketoacidosis , Pancreatitis , Adult , Female , Humans , Child , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/complications , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/diagnosis , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/therapy , Pancreatitis/complications , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Acute Disease , Blood Glucose , COVID-19/complications
2.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 77(1): 66-73, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mainly involves the respiratory system but can also affect the digestive system and cause several gastrointestinal manifestations. Acute pancreatitis has been reported as one of the rare presentations of COVID-19. This study aimed to systematically review case reports on COVID-19-associated acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Publications were retrieved through a comprehensive search in four databases on October 1, 2021. Eligible ones that demonstrated the potential association of acute pancreatitis and COVID-19 were included for data extraction. RESULTS: After screening 855 citations, 82 articles containing 95 cases were included, and their data were extracted. The most common presentation was abdominal pain (88/95, 92.6%), followed by nausea/vomiting (61/95, 64.2%). Mortality was reported in 10.5% of cases. The initial presentation was acute pancreatitis, COVID-19, and concomitant in 32.6% (31/95), 48.4% (46/95), and 18.9% (18/95) of cases, respectively. Among the included cases, acute pancreatitis severity was associated with ICU admission, COVID-19 severity, and the outcome. Also, the initial presentation was associated with COVID-19 severity (P values ˂0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence indicates that acute pancreatitis can present before, after, or concomitant with COVID-19. Appropriate investigations should be performed in cases with suspicious clinical presentations. Longitudinal studies should address whether or not, there is a causative relationship between COVID-19 and acute pancreatitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , Pancreatitis/etiology , Poland
3.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(8): 1286-1288, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324863

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been associated with gastrointestinal manifestations, its effect on the pancreas remains unclear. We aimed to assess the frequency and characteristics of hyperlipasemia in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized patients across 6 US centers with COVID-19. RESULTS: Of 71 patients, 9 (12.1%) developed hyperlipasemia, with 2 (2.8%) greater than 3 times upper limit of normal. No patient developed acute pancreatitis. Hyperlipasemia was not associated with poor outcomes or symptoms. DISCUSSION: Although a mild elevation in serum lipase was observed in some patients with COVID-19, clinical acute pancreatitis was not seen.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lipase/blood , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anorexia/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/blood , Pancreatitis/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , United States/epidemiology , Vomiting/epidemiology
4.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 23(1): 197, 2023 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321429

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Purtscher retinopathy is a rare occlusive microangiopathy comprising a constellation of retinal signs including cotton wool spots, retinal hemorrhages and Purtscher flecken. While classical Purtscher must be antedated by a traumatic incident, Purtscher-like retinopathy is used to refer to the same clinical syndrome in the absence of trauma. Various non-traumatic conditions have been associated with Purtscher-like retinopathy e.g. acute pancreatitis, preeclampsia, parturition, renal failure and multiple connective tissue disorders. In this case study, we report the occurrence of Purtscher-like retinopathy following coronary artery bypass grafting in a female patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). CASE PRESENTATION: A 48-year-old Caucasian female patient presented with a complaint of acute painless diminution of vision in the left eye (OS) that occurred approximately two months earlier. Clinical history revealed that the patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) two months earlier and that visual symptoms started 4 days thereafter. Furthermore, the patient reported undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) one year before for another myocardial ischemic event. Ophthalmological examination revealed multiple yellowish-white superficial retinal lesions i.e. cotton-wool spots, exclusively in the posterior pole and predominantly macular within the temporal vascular arcades only OS. Fundus examination of the right eye (OD) was normal and the anterior segment examination of both eyes (OU) was unremarkable. A diagnosis of Purtscher-like retinopathy was made based on clinical signs, suggestive history and consolidated by fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) of macula, optic nerve head (ONH) according to the diagnostic guidelines of Miguel. The patient was referred to a rheumatologist to identify the underlying systemic cause and was diagnosed with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). CONCLUSIONS: We report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy complicating primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) following coronary artery bypass grafting. This conveys a message to clinicians that patients presenting with Purtscher-like retinopathy should undergo meticulous systemic work-up in order to identify potentially life-threatening underlying systemic diseases.


Subject(s)
Antiphospholipid Syndrome , Pancreatitis , Papilledema , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Retinal Diseases , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/complications , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Disease , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Pancreatitis/complications , Retinal Diseases/diagnosis , Retinal Diseases/etiology , Fluorescein Angiography/methods , Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effects
6.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 174(6): 806-809, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315974

ABSTRACT

We studied the neutrophils and monocytes obtained from 37 patients with various inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, acute infectious process in the abdominal cavity (acute appendicitis/abscess of the abdominal cavity, and acute cholecystitis), acute pancreatitis, and post-COVID syndrome after mild COVID infection. The number and the morphological structure of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) as well as the effect of IgG on NET were examined. NET were visualized and counted by fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent dye SYBR Green. All the studied types of inflammation were accompanied by spontaneous formation of NET. After application of IgG, the number of NET doubled, their size increased, and transformation of net-like traps into the cloud forms was observed. The clouds form structure of the network is not capable of capturing pathogens with subsequent retraction, the products of its enzymatic degradation can be the factors of secondary alteration. The study results demonstrate a previously unknown mechanism of infection resistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracellular Traps , Pancreatitis , Humans , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Acute Disease , Pancreatitis/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism
7.
Intern Med J ; 53(5): 830-834, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317664

ABSTRACT

This audit collates data on alcohol-related gastrointestinal (GI) admissions at Monash Health, Victoria, during the prolonged, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related lockdown July to October 2020 compared with the same periods in 2019 and 2021. We found a 58% increase in admissions in 2020 and a 16% increase in 2021, which also increased disproportionately to overall health service emergency presentations. Self-reported alcohol consumption increased by 2.5-fold and was greatest in 2020. Clinical severity was unchanged and cirrhosis was the only factor associated with severe disease. This study suggests an association between the pandemic-related lockdown, alcohol consumption and alcohol-related GI hospitalisation. Our study provides support for resourcing and adapting alcohol and other drug services during and beyond the COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , Communicable Disease Control , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage , Ethanol , Alcohol Drinking , Hospitalization , Liver
9.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 40(4): 602-604, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307465

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the actions taken to combat it have greatly impacted the health infrastructure of all nations. Here we present a rare case of leptospirosis with severe acute pancreatitis, bilateral peripheral gangrene, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and multiorgan failure. This is a rare presentation of leptospirosis wherein the patient had no history suggestive of acquisition of leptospires. The patient was started on doxycycline but still could not be saved due to the multisystem involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leptospirosis , Pancreatitis , Acute Disease , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Humans , Leptospirosis/complications , Leptospirosis/diagnosis , Leptospirosis/drug therapy , Pancreatitis/complications , Pancreatitis/etiology , Pandemics
10.
Clin J Gastroenterol ; 16(2): 297-302, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296967

ABSTRACT

A 70-year-old man with epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed the diffusely enlarged pancreas compared to his normal pancreas 6 months prior to presentation. Serum levels of IgG4 and amylase were normal, while C-reactive protein was slightly elevated. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of the pancreas revealed acinar-ductal metaplasia with neutrophil infiltration and without infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells. After the clinical diagnosis of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), his symptoms spontaneously improved without steroid therapy. Three months later, radiological findings showed improved pancreas size and serological findings. The pathological diagnosis of type 2 AIP using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy is challenging, particularly for proving granulocyte epithelial lesions. This was a valuable type 2 AIP case in which the images before, at the time of onset, and at the time of spontaneous remission were evaluated.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , Autoimmune Pancreatitis , Pancreatitis , Male , Humans , Aged , Pancreatitis/diagnostic imaging , Pancreatitis/drug therapy , Remission, Spontaneous , Autoimmune Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Immunoglobulin G
11.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1115552, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255878

ABSTRACT

Serving as the guardians of small intestine, Paneth cells (PCs) play an important role in intestinal homeostasis maintenance. Although PCs uniquely exist in intestine under homeostasis, the dysfunction of PCs is involved in various diseases not only in intestine but also in extraintestinal organs, suggesting the systemic importance of PCs. The mechanisms under the participation of PCs in these diseases are multiple as well. The involvements of PCs are mostly characterized by limiting intestinal bacterial translocation in necrotizing enterocolitis, liver disease, acute pancreatitis and graft-vs-host disease. Risk genes in PCs render intestine susceptible to Crohn's disease. In intestinal infection, different pathogens induce varied responses in PCs, and toll-like receptor ligands on bacterial surface trigger the degranulation of PCs. The increased level of bile acid dramatically impairs PCs in obesity. PCs can inhibit virus entry and promote intestinal regeneration to alleviate COVID-19. On the contrary, abundant IL-17A in PCs aggravates multi-organ injury in ischemia/reperfusion. The pro-angiogenic effect of PCs aggravates the severity of portal hypertension. Therapeutic strategies targeting PCs mainly include PC protection, PC-derived inflammatory cytokine elimination, and substituting AMP treatment. In this review, we discuss the influence and importance of Paneth cells in both intestinal and extraintestinal diseases as reported so far, as well as the potential therapeutic strategies targeting PCs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , Paneth Cells/physiology , Acute Disease , Intestines
12.
Gastroenterol Clin North Am ; 52(1): 37-48, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255642

ABSTRACT

An association between acute pancreatitis (AP) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been proposed but the mechanisms of pancreatic injury of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the implicative role on the development of AP are not yet fully understood. COVID-19 also imposed major challenges on pancreatic cancer management. We conducted an analysis on the mechanisms of pancreatic injury by SARS-CoV-2 and reviewed published case reports of AP attributed to COVID-19. We also examined the pandemic effect on pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management, including pancreatic surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Pancreatitis , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Pancreatitis/etiology , Acute Disease , Pancreas
13.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 3814, 2023 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267718

ABSTRACT

We aimed to develop presepsin as a marker of diagnosis of severe infections of either bacterial and viral origin. The derivation cohort was recruited from 173 hospitalized patients with acute pancreatitis or post-operative fever or infection suspicion aggravated by at least one sign of the quick sequential organ failure assessment (qSOFA). The first validation cohort was recruited from 57 admissions at the emergency department with at least one qSOFA sign and the second validation cohort from 115 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Presepsin was measured in plasma by the PATHFAST assay. Concentrations more than 350 pg/ml had sensitivity 80.2% for sepsis diagnosis in the derivation cohort (adjusted odds ratio 4.47; p < 0.0001). In the derivation cohort, sensitivity for 28-day mortality prognosis was 91.5% (adjusted odds ratio 6.82; p: 0.001). Concentrations above 350 pg/ml had sensitivity 93.3% for the diagnosis of sepsis in the first validation cohort; this was 78.3% in the second validation cohort of COVID-19 aiming at the early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome necessitating mechanical ventilation. The respective sensitivity for 28-day mortality was 85.7% and 92.3%. Presepsin may be a universal biomarker for the diagnosis of severe infections of bacterial origin and prediction of unfavorable outcome.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Sepsis , Humans , Acute Disease , Prognosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Sepsis/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Peptide Fragments , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors
14.
J Anesth ; 37(3): 487-491, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266949

ABSTRACT

Pancreatic injury is considered an organ-related complication in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, it is unclear whether COVID-19 status affects pancreatic injury. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether COVID-19 affects the occurrence of pancreatic injuries. Consecutive patients diagnosed with sepsis admitted to the ICU between March 2020 and September 2021 were included. The primary endpoint was a pancreatic injury, which was defined as amylase or lipase levels > 3 times the upper limit of the normal range. Among the 177 patients included in the analysis, 40 (23%) were COVID-19 patients, and 54 (31%) had pancreatic injuries. Of these three patients, acute pancreatitis was diagnosed based on computed tomography. The pancreatic injury was significantly more common among COVID-19 patients (75 vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that COVID-19 and steroid use were independent risk factors for pancreatic injury (Odds Ratio (OR) 4.79 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48-15.5], p = 0.009; OR 4.02 [95% CI 1.42-11.4], p = 0.009). This study revealed that the proportion of pancreatic injury in septic patients with COVID-19 was significantly higher than in those without COVID-19. It may be difficult to diagnose pancreatitis based on amylase and lipase levels in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Acute Disease , COVID-19/complications , Amylases , Lipase
15.
Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int ; 22(4): 399-402, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic issue. In addition to the well-known respiratory and fever symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms have also been reported. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognosis of patients with COVID-19 infection complicated with acute pancreatitis in intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: This was a retrospective observational cohort study, and patients aged 18 years or older, admitted into the ICU in a single tertiary center from January 1, 2020, to April 30, 2022 were enrolled. Patients were identified by electronic medical records and reviewed manually. The primary outcome was the prevalence of acute pancreatitis among ICU patients with COVID-19. The secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay, need for mechanical ventilation (MV), need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: A total of 4133 patients, admitted into the ICU, were screened. Among these patients, 389 were infected by COVID-19, and 86 were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. COVID-19 positive patients were more likely to present with acute pancreatitis than COVID-19 negative patients (odds ratio = 5.42, 95% confidence interval: 2.35-6.58, P < 0.01). However, the length of hospital stay, need for MV, need for CRRT, and in-hospital mortality were not significantly different between acute pancreatitis patients with and without COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 infections may cause acute pancreas damage in critically ill patients. However, the prognosis may not differ between acute pancreatitis patients with and without COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/therapy , Prevalence , Acute Disease , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/therapy , Prognosis , Intensive Care Units , Retrospective Studies
16.
Nat Commun ; 14(1): 983, 2023 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287247

ABSTRACT

A comprehensive evaluation of the risks and 1-year burdens of gastrointestinal disorders in the post-acute phase of COVID-19 is needed but is not yet available. Here we use the US Department of Veterans Affairs national health care databases to build a cohort of 154,068 people with COVID-19, 5,638,795 contemporary controls, and 5,859,621 historical controls to estimate the risks and 1-year burdens of a set of pre-specified incident gastrointestinal outcomes. We show that beyond the first 30 days of infection, people with COVID-19 exhibited increased risks and 1-year burdens of incident gastrointestinal disorders spanning several disease categories including motility disorders, acid related disorders (dyspepsia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease), functional intestinal disorders, acute pancreatitis, hepatic and biliary disease. The risks were evident in people who were not hospitalized during the acute phase of COVID-19 and increased in a graded fashion across the severity spectrum of the acute phase of COVID-19 (non-hospitalized, hospitalized, and admitted to intensive care). The risks were consistent in comparisons including the COVID-19 vs the contemporary control group and COVID-19 vs the historical control group as the referent category. Altogether, our results show that people with SARS-CoV-2 infection are at increased risk of gastrointestinal disorders in the post-acute phase of COVID-19. Post-covid care should involve attention to gastrointestinal health and disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Peptic Ulcer , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(4)2023 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232630

ABSTRACT

Acute pancreatitis is a common gastrointestinal disease with increasing incidence worldwide. COVID-19 is a potentially life-threatening contagious disease spread throughout the world, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. More severe forms of both diseases exhibit commonalities with dysregulated immune responses resulting in amplified inflammation and susceptibility to infection. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, expressed on antigen-presenting cells, acts as an indicator of immune function. Research advances have highlighted the predictive values of monocytic HLA-DR (mHLA-DR) expression for disease severity and infectious complications in both acute pancreatitis and COVID-19 patients. While the regulatory mechanism of altered mHLA-DR expression remains unclear, HLA-DR-/low monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells are potent drivers of immunosuppression and poor outcomes in these diseases. Future studies with mHLA-DR-guided enrollment or targeted immunotherapy are warranted in more severe cases of patients with acute pancreatitis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis , Humans , Acute Disease , HLA-DR Antigens , Monocytes , Immunity
18.
Scand J Gastroenterol ; 58(7): 798-804, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic conditioned the optimal timing of some endoscopic procedures. ESGE guidelines recommend replacement or removal of the plastic biliary stents within 3-6 months to reduce the risk of complications. Our aim was to analyse the outcomes of patients who had delayed plastic biliary stent removal following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the pandemic era. METHODS: Retrospective study including consecutive ERCPs with plastic biliary stent placement between January 2019 and December 2021. Delayed removal was defined as presence of biliary stent >6 months after ERCP. The evaluated outcomes were stent migration, stent dysfunction, obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, acute pancreatitis, hospitalization, and biliary pathology-related mortality. RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty ERCPs were included, 56.7% male patients, with a mean age of 69.4 ± 15.7 years. Indications for plastic biliary stent insertion were choledocholithiasis (72.5%), benign biliary stricture (20.0%), and post-cholecystectomy fistula (7.5%). Delayed stent removal occurred in 32.5% of the cases. The median time to stent removal was 3.5 ± 1.3 months for early removal and 8.6 ± 3.1 months for delayed removal. Patients who had delayed stent removal did not have a significantly higher frequency of stent migration (20.5 vs 11.1%, p = 0.17), stent dysfunction (17.9 vs 13.6%, p = 0.53), hospitalization (17.9 vs 14.8%, p = 0.66), obstructive jaundice (2.6 vs 0.0%, p = 0.33), cholangitis (10.3 vs 13.6%, p = 0.77), acute pancreatitis (0.0 vs 1.2%, p = 1.0), or biliary pathology-related mortality (2.6 vs 1.2%, p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: Delayed plastic biliary stent removal does not seem to have a negative impact on patients' outcomes. In the current pandemic situation, while scheduled endoscopic procedures may have to be postponed, elective removal of plastic biliary stents can be safely deferred.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cholangitis , Cholestasis , Jaundice, Obstructive , Pancreatitis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Jaundice, Obstructive/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Plastics , Acute Disease , Pandemics , Pancreatitis/etiology , Pancreatitis/complications , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde/adverse effects , Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde/methods , Cholestasis/etiology , Cholangitis/epidemiology , Cholangitis/etiology , Stents/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
19.
World J Gastroenterol ; 29(4): 744-757, 2023 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2227073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the coronavirus on hospitalizations for gastrointestinal (GI) disease, particularly at a population level is understudied. AIM: To investigate trends in hospitalizations, inpatient endoscopy resource utilization, and outcomes during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns. METHODS: Using the California State Inpatient Database for 2018-2020, we explored year-to-year and 2020 month-to-month trends in hospitalizations, length of stay, and inpatient mortality (all-cause & viral pneumonia-specific) for common inpatient GI diagnoses including acute pancreatitis, diverticulitis, cholelithiasis, non-infectious gastroenteritis, upper and lower GI bleeding (LGIB), Clostridium difficile, viral gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and acute cholangitis. RESULTS: Disease-specific hospitalizations decreased for all included conditions except nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (NVUGIB), LGIB, and ulcerative colitis (UC) (ptrend < 0.0001). All-cause inpatient mortality was higher in 2020 vs 2019, for acute pancreatitis (P = 0.029), diverticulitis (P = 0.04), NVUGIB (P = 0.003), and Crohn's disease (P = 0.004). In 2020, hospitalization rates were lowest in April, November, and December. There was no significant corresponding increase in inpatient mortality except in UC (ptrend = 0.048). Viral pneumonia and viral pneumonia complicated by respiratory failure increased (P < 0.001) among GI hospitalizations. Endoscopy utilization within 24 h of admission was unchanged for GI emergencies except NVUGIB (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that hospitalization rates for common GI conditions significantly declined in California during the COVID pandemic, particularly in April, November and December 2020. All-cause mortality was significantly higher among acute pancreatitis, diverticulitis, NVUGIB, and Crohn's disease hospitalizations. Emergency endoscopy rates were mostly comparable between 2020 and 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Diverticulitis , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Pancreatitis , Humans , Crohn Disease/complications , Acute Disease , Pandemics , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/therapy , Pancreatitis/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/complications , Colitis, Ulcerative/complications , Diverticulitis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
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