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2.
Postgrad Med J ; 96(1137): 399-402, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234171

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2) that initially originated from Wuhan, China, in December 2019 has already caused a pandemic. While this novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) frequently induces mild diseases, it has also generated severe diseases among certain populations, including older-aged individuals with underlying diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. As of 31 March 2020, a total of 9786 confirmed cases with COVID-19 have been reported in South Korea. South Korea has the highest diagnostic rate for COVID-19, which has been the major contributor in overcoming this outbreak. We are trying to reduce the reproduction number of COVID-19 to less than one and eventually succeed in controlling this outbreak using methods such as contact tracing, quarantine, testing, isolation, social distancing and school closure. This report aimed to describe the current situation of COVID-19 in South Korea and our response to this outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Quarantine/organization & administration , Basic Reproduction Number , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Evidence-Based Medicine , Human Activities , Humans , Physical Distancing , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
18.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 148(13): e65-e75, 2023 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234277

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the present paper we aim to describe the experience of a large chemical company in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, we describe the timing and content of implemented measures and outline the course of the pandemic from the company's perspective. METHODS: We describe the infection protection measures and the pandemic course at the company's main site in Ludwigshafen (Germany) from March 2020 to May 2022. Company-specific data on the date of reporting an infection, suspected place of infection, number of close contacts, and the employee group were used to calculate 7-day-incidences and visualized, among other things, by means of a plant map (active infections) and a network chart (chains of infection). In addition, a weighted average of the incidences from districts close to the plant (weighted by the number of resident employees within the district) was calculated using publicly available data by the Robert Koch Institute and compared with the course of company-specific incidences. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up on 31st May 2022, 9,379 infections with SARS-CoV-2 had been recorded in employees and 758 more in leasing staff, including 368 (4%) and 84 (11%) suspected infections at the workplace/on-site, respectively. The course of 7-day incidences among employees was mainly consistent with that in the surrounding districts. The incidence of suspected infections on-site/at the workplace remained predominantly at a comparatively low level below 100 new infections over 7 days/100,000. DISCUSSION: The continuous monitoring and analysis of new SARS-CoV-2 cases among employees provides valuable information for the effective management of protective measures in the company. It enables a targeted response to changes in the number of new cases on the plant site by tightening or relaxing protective measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Germany/epidemiology , Incidence
19.
Radiat Prot Dosimetry ; 199(8-9): 995-1001, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234268

ABSTRACT

The SCK CEN Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology functions as the umbrella structure coordinating the education and training activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN). One of the main activities of the SCK CEN Academy is to provide customised training to professionals working in the nuclear industry, healthcare, research or governmental institutions. The courses and practical sessions are usually given in a face-to-face (FTF) format. This has drastically changed in the last 2 y because of the COVID-19 pandemic when it was necessary to switch course delivery from FTF to an online format. Feedback was collected from trainees and trainers in different training courses in radiation protection provided in FTF and online format. The analysis of this feedback allows training providers to make better-informed decisions on the best-suited training format depending on the content, target audience and the duration of the learning activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiation Protection , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Academies and Institutes , Health Facilities
20.
Western Pac Surveill Response J ; 14(1): 1-7, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234122

ABSTRACT

Objective: This paper examines the contributions made by the National Institute of Public Health to Cambodia's response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic during 2020-2021. Methods: The activities conducted by the Institute were compared with adaptations of the nine pillars of the World Health Organization's 2020 COVID-19 strategic preparedness and response plan. To gather relevant evidence, we reviewed national COVID-19 testing data, information about COVID-19-related events documented by Institute staff, and financial and technical reports of the Institute's activities. Results: The main contributions the Institute made were to the laboratory pillar and the incident management and planning pillar. The Institute tested more than 50% of the 2 575 391 samples for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing and provided technical advice about establishing 18 new laboratories for SARS-CoV-2 testing in the capital city of Phnom Penh and 11 provinces. The Institute had representatives on many national committees and coauthored national guidelines for implementing rapid COVID-19 testing, preventing transmission in health-care facilities and providing treatment. The Institute contributed to six other pillars, but had no active role in risk communication and community engagement. Discussion: The Institute's support was essential to the COVID-19 response in Cambodia, especially for laboratory services and incident management and planning. Based on the contributions made by the Institute during the COVID-19 pandemic, continued investment in it will be critical to allow it to support responses to future health emergencies in Cambodia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cambodia/epidemiology , Public Health
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