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1.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542790

ABSTRACT

The detailed characterization of human γδ T lymphocyte differentiation at the single-cell transcriptomic (scRNAseq) level in tumors and patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) requires both a reference differentiation trajectory of γδ T cells and a robust mapping method for additional γδ T lymphocytes. Here, we incepted such a method to characterize thousands of γδ T lymphocytes from (n = 95) patients with cancer or adult and pediatric COVID-19 disease. We found that cancer patients with human papillomavirus-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and Epstein-Barr virus-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma have γδ tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes that are more prone to recirculate from the tumor and avoid exhaustion. In COVID-19, both TCRVγ9 and TCRVγnon9 subsets of γδ T lymphocytes relocalize from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to the infected lung tissue, where their advanced differentiation, tissue residency, and exhaustion reflect T cell activation. Although severe COVID-19 disease increases both recruitment and exhaustion of γδ T lymphocytes in infected lung lesions but not blood, the anti-IL6R therapy with Tocilizumab promotes γδ T lymphocyte differentiation in patients with COVID-19. PBMC from pediatric patients with acute COVID-19 disease display similar γδ T cell lymphopenia to that seen in adult patients. However, blood γδ T cells from children with the COVID-19-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome are not lymphodepleted, but they are differentiated as in healthy PBMC. These findings suggest that some virus-induced memory γδ T lymphocytes durably persist in the blood of adults and could subsequently infiltrate and recirculate in tumors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Adult , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Differentiation , Child , Head and Neck Neoplasms/immunology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/virology , Herpesvirus 4, Human/isolation & purification , Hodgkin Disease/immunology , Hodgkin Disease/virology , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/metabolism , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/physiology , Neoplasms/virology , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/physiology
2.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502529

ABSTRACT

The detailed characterization of human γδ T lymphocyte differentiation at the single-cell transcriptomic (scRNAseq) level in tumors and patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) requires both a reference differentiation trajectory of γδ T cells and a robust mapping method for additional γδ T lymphocytes. Here, we incepted such a method to characterize thousands of γδ T lymphocytes from (n = 95) patients with cancer or adult and pediatric COVID-19 disease. We found that cancer patients with human papillomavirus-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and Epstein-Barr virus-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma have γδ tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes that are more prone to recirculate from the tumor and avoid exhaustion. In COVID-19, both TCRVγ9 and TCRVγnon9 subsets of γδ T lymphocytes relocalize from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to the infected lung tissue, where their advanced differentiation, tissue residency, and exhaustion reflect T cell activation. Although severe COVID-19 disease increases both recruitment and exhaustion of γδ T lymphocytes in infected lung lesions but not blood, the anti-IL6R therapy with Tocilizumab promotes γδ T lymphocyte differentiation in patients with COVID-19. PBMC from pediatric patients with acute COVID-19 disease display similar γδ T cell lymphopenia to that seen in adult patients. However, blood γδ T cells from children with the COVID-19-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome are not lymphodepleted, but they are differentiated as in healthy PBMC. These findings suggest that some virus-induced memory γδ T lymphocytes durably persist in the blood of adults and could subsequently infiltrate and recirculate in tumors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Adult , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Differentiation , Child , Head and Neck Neoplasms/immunology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/virology , Herpesvirus 4, Human/isolation & purification , Hodgkin Disease/immunology , Hodgkin Disease/virology , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/metabolism , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/physiology , Neoplasms/virology , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/physiology
3.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(10): 919-926, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450634

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization global call to eliminate cervical cancer encourages countries to consider introducing or improving cervical cancer screening programs. Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS) is among the world's largest public health systems offering free cytology testing, follow-up colposcopy, and treatment. Yet, health care networks across the country have unequal infrastructure, human resources, equipment, and supplies resulting in uneven program performance and large disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality. An effective screening program needs multiple strategies feasible for each community's reality, facilitating coverage and follow-up adherence. Prioritizing those at highest risk with tests that better stratify risk will limit inefficiencies, improving program impact across different resource settings. Highly sensitive human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA testing performs better than cytology and, with self-collection closer to homes and workplaces, improves access, even in remote regions. Molecular triage strategies like HPV genotyping can identify from the same self-collected sample, those at highest risk requiring follow-up. If proven acceptable, affordable, cost-effective, and efficient in the Brazilian context, these strategies would increase coverage while removing the need for speculum exams for routine screening and reducing follow-up visits. SUS could implement a nationwide organized program that accommodates heterogenous settings across Brazil, informing a variety of screening programs worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytodiagnosis/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Brazil/epidemiology , DNA, Viral/analysis , DNA, Viral/genetics , Female , Humans , Papillomavirus Infections/genetics , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology
5.
J Med Screen ; 28(2): 213-216, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To quantify the secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic disruptions to cervical cancer screening in the United States, stratified by step in the screening process and primary test modality, on cervical cancer burden. METHODS: We conducted a comparative model-based analysis using three independent NCI Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network cervical models to quantify the impact of eight alternative COVID-19-related screening disruption scenarios compared to a scenario of no disruptions. Scenarios varied by the duration of the disruption (6 or 24 months), steps in the screening process being disrupted (primary screening, surveillance, colposcopy, excisional treatment), and primary screening modality (cytology alone or cytology plus human papillomavirus "cotesting"). RESULTS: The models consistently showed that COVID-19-related disruptions yield small net increases in cervical cancer cases by 2027, which are greater for women previously screened with cytology compared with cotesting. When disruptions affected all four steps in the screening process under cytology-based screening, there were an additional 5-7 and 38-45 cases per one million screened for 6- and 24-month disruptions, respectively. In contrast, under cotesting, there were additional 4-5 and 35-45 cases per one million screened for 6- and 24-month disruptions, respectively. The majority (58-79%) of the projected increases in cases under cotesting were due to disruptions to surveillance, colposcopies, or excisional treatment, rather than to primary screening. CONCLUSIONS: Women in need of surveillance, colposcopies, or excisional treatment, or whose last primary screen did not involve human papillomavirus testing, may comprise priority groups for reintroductions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Early Detection of Cancer , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Adult , Colposcopy , Cytological Techniques , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , United States , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology
6.
J Exp Clin Cancer Res ; 39(1): 200, 2020 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-coronavirus-2 enters host cells through binding of the Spike protein to ACE2 receptor and subsequent S priming by the TMPRSS2 protease. We aim to assess differences in both ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in normal tissues from oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and lung tissues as well as neoplastic tissues from the same areas. METHODS: The study has been conducted using the TCGA and the Regina Elena Institute databases and validated by experimental model in HNSCC cells. We also included data from one COVID19 patient who went under surgery for HNSCC. RESULTS: TMPRSS2 expression in HNSCC was significantly reduced compared to the normal tissues. It was more evident in women than in men, in TP53 mutated versus wild TP53 tumors, in HPV negative patients compared to HPV positive counterparts. Functionally, we modeled the multivariate effect of TP53, HPV, and other inherent variables on TMPRSS2. All variables had a statistically significant independent effect on TMPRSS2. In particular, in tumor tissues, HPV negative, TP53 mutated status and elevated TP53-dependent Myc-target genes were associated with low TMPRSS2 expression. The further analysis of both TCGA and our institutional HNSCC datasets identified a signature anti-correlated to TMPRSS2. As proof-of-principle we also validated the anti-correlation between microRNAs and TMPRSS2 expression in a SARS-CoV-2 positive HNSCC patient tissues Finally, we did not find TMPRSS2 promoter methylation. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these findings suggest that tumoral tissues, herein exemplified by HNSCC and lung cancers might be more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection due to reduced expression of TMPRSS2. These observations may help to better assess the frailty of SARS-CoV-2 positive cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/pathology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Head and Neck Neoplasms/metabolism , Head and Neck Neoplasms/virology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/metabolism , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/virology , Survival Rate
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