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2.
Euro Surveill ; 26(50)2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592477

ABSTRACT

While many European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries recently expanded human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to boys, HPV vaccine supply is currently limited for girls in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) that are severely affected by HPV.Globally, about 50% of countries have introduced HPV vaccination. Some LMIC with high burden of cervical cancer have not yet introduced HPV vaccination, or are reaching suboptimal vaccination coverage. While WHO issued a call for cervical cancer elimination in 2018, a global shortage of HPV vaccines is currently predicted to last at least until 2024.We reviewed national policies of EU/EEA countries and recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunisation to discuss current challenges and dose-sparing options. Several EU/EEA countries have extended HPV vaccination to boys and the European Cancer Organisation has issued a resolution for elimination of all HPV-associated cancers in both sexes. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control concluded in its 2020 guidance that cost-effectiveness of extending routine vaccination to boys depends on several context-specific factors. The extension of HPV vaccination to boys in EU/EEA countries may affect global availability of vaccines. Temporary dose-sparing options could be considered during the COVID-19 post-pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , European Union , Female , Humans , Immunization , Male , Morals , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Vaccination
3.
J Low Genit Tract Dis ; 26(1): 13-19, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592137

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term sustainability of a multilevel intervention and the COVID-19 pandemic impact on adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2016, a pediatric and family medicine practice within a federally qualified health center completed a multilevel intervention, Development of Systems and Education for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. We examined the intervention impact on HPV vaccine initiation and completion rates among adolescents 10-18 years between March 2016 and October 2020. We determined the total number of HPV vaccine doses administered monthly. Data were plotted on statistical process control charts. RESULTS: Vaccine initiation increased from an average of 14% to an average of 42% for 10-year-old patients and from an average of 72% to an average of 92% for 11- to 12-year-old patients between March 2016 and January 2017 and remained stable through March 2020. Complete vaccination by age 13 years increased from 62% to 88% through October 2020. CONCLUSIONS: This intervention led to continued improvement for on-time HPV vaccination coverage 4 years after intervention completion.Clinical Trial Registration: This trial has been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT02812732).


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 365-375, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490458

ABSTRACT

Concerns about vaccine safety are an important reason for vaccine hesitancy, however, limited information is available on whether common adverse reactions following vaccination affect the immune response. Data from three clinical trials of recombinant vaccines were used in this post hoc analysis to assess the correlation between inflammation-related solicited adverse reactions (ISARs, including local pain, redness, swelling or induration and systematic fever) and immune responses after vaccination. In the phase III trial of the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cecolin®), the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) for IgG anti-HPV-16 and -18 (P<0.001) were significantly higher in participants with any ISAR following vaccination than in those without an ISAR. Local pain, induration, swelling and systemic fever were significantly correlated with higher GMCs for IgG anti-HPV-16 and/or anti-HPV-18, respectively. Furthermore, the analyses of the immunogenicity bridging study of Cecolin® and the phase III trial of a hepatitis E vaccine yielded similar results. Based on these results, we built a scoring model to quantify the inflammation reactions and found that the high score of ISAR indicates the strong vaccine-induced antibody level. In conclusion, this study suggests inflammation-related adverse reactions following vaccination potentially indicate a stronger immune response.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis E/immunology , Human papillomavirus 16/immunology , Human papillomavirus 18/immunology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Hepatitis E/prevention & control , Hepatitis E/virology , Human papillomavirus 16/genetics , Human papillomavirus 18/genetics , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Papillomavirus Vaccines/genetics , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/adverse effects , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/genetics , Young Adult
6.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Efficacy for cervical cancer prevention of opportunistic HPV vaccination in post-pubertal girls is lower than in 11-year-olds. METHODS: Women born between 1986 and 1992 vaccinated at 15-25 years of age (at least one dose of 4-valent HPV vaccine) and screened at 24-27 years of age were included. Frequency of opportunistic vaccination, overall and by birth cohort, was calculated; screening outcomes were compared between vaccinated and unvaccinated women. RESULTS: Overall, 4718 (4.9%) HPV-vaccinated, and 91,512 unvaccinated, women were studied. The frequency of vaccination increased by birth cohort, ranging between 1.8% and 9.8%; age at vaccination decreased progressively by birth cohort (p < 0.0001). Participation in screening was 60.8% among vaccinated, and 56.6% among unvaccinated, women (p < 0.0001). Detection rates (DR) for high-grade lesions were lower in vaccinated women (2.11‰ vs. 3.85‰ in unvaccinated, for CIN3+, p = 0.24; 0.0‰ vs. 0.22‰ for cancer). The DR of CIN3+ increased with age at vaccination, scoring respectively 0.0‰, 0.83‰, and 4.68‰ for women vaccinated when they were 15-16, 17-20, and 21-25 years old (p = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to unvaccinated women, higher compliance with cervical cancer screening invitation and lower CIN3+ DR among vaccinated women was observed. Age at vaccination was inversely correlated to vaccination efficacy.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Screening , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
7.
Obstet Gynecol ; 135(5): 1070-1083, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455363

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of adjuvant human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in preventing recurrent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or greater after surgical excision. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases (Cochrane, PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov) were searched for studies comparing surgical excision alone to surgical excision with adjuvant HPV vaccination for CIN 2 or greater. Studies published from January 1990 to January 2019 were included. METHODS: A total of 5,901 studies were reviewed. The primary outcomes evaluated included: recurrence of CIN 2 or greater, CIN 1 or greater, and HPV 16,18 associated CIN within 6-48 months. We used Covidence software to assist with screening, and meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Six studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. In total 2,984 women were included; 1,360 (45.6%) received adjuvant HPV vaccination after surgical excision, and 1,624 (54.4%) received either placebo or surgical management alone for CIN 2 or greater. Recurrence of CIN 2 or greater occurred within 6-48 months in 115 women (3.9%) overall; however, recurrence was significantly lower for vaccinated women: 26 of 1,360 women (1.9%) vs 89 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (5.9%) (relative risk [RR] 0.36 95% CI 0.23-0.55). The risk of CIN 1 or greater was also significantly lower with adjuvant HPV vaccination, occurring in 86 of 1,360 vaccinated women (6.3%) vs 157 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (9.7%) (RR 0.67 95% CI 0.52-0.85). Thirty-five women developed recurrent CIN 2 or greater lesions specific to HPV 16,18; nine received adjuvant vaccination (0.9%) vs 26 who were unvaccinated (2.0%) (RR 0.41 95% CI 0.20-0.85). CONCLUSION: Adjuvant HPV vaccination in the setting of surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent cervical dysplasia overall and a reduction in the risk of recurrent lesions caused by the most oncogenic strains (HPV 16,18). Human papillomavirus vaccination should therefore be considered for adjuvant treatment in patients undergoing surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO, CRD42019123786.


Subject(s)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/surgery , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/virology , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/virology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Treatment Outcome , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology , Young Adult
8.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(10): 919-926, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450634

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization global call to eliminate cervical cancer encourages countries to consider introducing or improving cervical cancer screening programs. Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS) is among the world's largest public health systems offering free cytology testing, follow-up colposcopy, and treatment. Yet, health care networks across the country have unequal infrastructure, human resources, equipment, and supplies resulting in uneven program performance and large disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality. An effective screening program needs multiple strategies feasible for each community's reality, facilitating coverage and follow-up adherence. Prioritizing those at highest risk with tests that better stratify risk will limit inefficiencies, improving program impact across different resource settings. Highly sensitive human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA testing performs better than cytology and, with self-collection closer to homes and workplaces, improves access, even in remote regions. Molecular triage strategies like HPV genotyping can identify from the same self-collected sample, those at highest risk requiring follow-up. If proven acceptable, affordable, cost-effective, and efficient in the Brazilian context, these strategies would increase coverage while removing the need for speculum exams for routine screening and reducing follow-up visits. SUS could implement a nationwide organized program that accommodates heterogenous settings across Brazil, informing a variety of screening programs worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytodiagnosis/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Brazil/epidemiology , DNA, Viral/analysis , DNA, Viral/genetics , Female , Humans , Papillomavirus Infections/genetics , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology
9.
Curr Oncol ; 28(5): 3705-3716, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438539

ABSTRACT

Despite a global and nationwide decrease, Native Americans continue to experience high rates of cancer morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is one approach to decrease cancer incidence such as the case of cervical cancer. However, the availability of vaccines does not guarantee uptake, as evident in the Coronavirus 2019 pandemic. Therefore, as we consider current and future cancer vaccines, there are certain considerations to be mindful of to increase uptake among Native Americans such as the incidence of disease, social determinants of health, vaccine hesitancy, and historical exclusion in clinical trials. This paper primarily focuses on human papillomavirus (HPV) and potential vaccines for Native Americans. However, we also aim to inform researchers on factors that influence Native American choices surrounding vaccination and interventions including cancer therapies. We begin by providing an overview of the historical distrust and trauma Native Americans experience, both past and present. In addition, we offer guidance and considerations when engaging with sovereign Tribal Nations in vaccine development and clinical trials in order to increase trust and encourage vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
Cancer Vaccines , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
11.
Cell Mol Life Sci ; 78(21-22): 6735-6744, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377320

ABSTRACT

Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) or kallikreins have been linked to diverse (patho) physiological processes, such as the epidermal desquamation and inflammation, seminal clot liquefaction, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Recent mounting evidence suggests that KLKs also represent important regulators of viral infections. It is well-established that certain enveloped viruses, including influenza and coronaviruses, require proteolytic processing of their hemagglutinin or spike proteins, respectively, to infect host cells. Similarly, the capsid protein of the non-enveloped papillomavirus L1 should be proteolytically cleaved for viral uncoating. Consequently, extracellular or membrane-bound proteases of the host cells are instrumental for viral infections and represent potential targets for drug development. Here, we summarize how extracellular proteolysis mediated by the kallikreins is implicated in the process of influenza (and potentially coronavirus and papillomavirus) entry into host cells. Besides direct proteolytic activation of viruses, KLK5 and 12 promote viral entry indirectly through proteolytic cascade events, like the activation of thrombolytic enzymes that also can process hemagglutinin, while additional functions of KLKs in infection cannot be excluded. In the light of recent evidence, KLKs represent potential host targets for the development of new antivirals. Humanized animal models to validate their key functions in viral infections will be valuable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Kallikreins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/enzymology , Animals , Asthma/etiology , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus/physiology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Humans , Orthomyxoviridae/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae/pathogenicity , Orthomyxoviridae/physiology , Papillomavirus Infections/enzymology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Picornaviridae Infections/complications , Picornaviridae Infections/enzymology , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Proteolysis , Rhinovirus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Varicella Zoster Virus Infection/enzymology , Varicella Zoster Virus Infection/virology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization
14.
Molecules ; 26(7)2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302415

ABSTRACT

The potential of first-void (FV) urine as a non-invasive liquid biopsy for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and other biomarkers has been increasingly recognized over the past decade. In this study, we investigated whether the volume of this initial urine stream has an impact on the analytical performance of biomarkers. In parallel, we evaluated different DNA extraction protocols and introduced an internal control in the urine preservative. Twenty-five women, diagnosed with high-risk HPV, provided three home-collected FV urine samples using three FV urine collection devices (Colli-Pee) with collector tubes that differ in volume (4, 10, 20 mL). Each collector tube was prefilled with Urine Conservation Medium spiked with phocine herpesvirus 1 (PhHV-1) DNA as internal control. Five different DNA extraction protocols were compared, followed by PCR for GAPDH and PhHV-1 (qPCR), HPV DNA, and HBB (HPV-Risk Assay), and ACTB (methylation-specific qPCR). Results showed limited effects of collection volume on human and HPV DNA endpoints. In contrast, significant variations in yield for human endpoints were observed for different DNA extraction methods (p < 0.05). Additionally, the potential of PhHV-1 as internal control to monitor FV urine collection, storage, and processing was demonstrated.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , DNA, Viral , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Papillomaviridae , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/urine , Adult , DNA, Viral/isolation & purification , DNA, Viral/urine , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Papillomaviridae/genetics , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Reproducibility of Results , Sensitivity and Specificity , Workflow , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253493, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298079

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To validate the colposcopy indication proposed by the 2019 ASCCP Risk-Based Management Consensus Guidelines for abnormal cervical cancer screening tests (the 2019 ASCCP guidelines). METHODS: Clinical data of 1404 patients who underwent colposcopy in single center in China were reviewed. Based on history and current cervical screening (HPV & cytology), corresponding recommendations were given according to the 2019 ASCCP guidelines. The agreement and discrepancy of colposcopy indication were analyzed between the Chinese consensus and the 2019 ASCCP guidelines. RESULTS: Colposcopy indication was matched in about 80% patients. The left 20% were recommended with follow-up by the 2019 ASCCP guidelines. The discrepancy mainly focused on patients having a current result of HPV-positive NILM without unknown history. The ratio of observed CIN3+ in our database over estimated CIN3+ by the 2019 ASCCP guidelines was 6.2 (31/5). The ratio was even higher in patients with HPV16/18-positive NILM (7, 28/4), compared with those with other types of high-risk HPV-positive NILM (3, 3/1). The 2019 ASCCP guidelines had a relatively high sensitivity (83.1%), a low specificity (21.5%), a low positive predictive value (14.1%) and a high negative predictive value (89.1%) for prediction of CIN 3+. CONCLUSIONS: We could try to apply the 2019 ASCCP guidelines in Chinese population. The classification of HR-HPV was strongly recommended during risk assessment. For patients with HPV16/18 infection, colposcopy should be recommended. Perspective multi-center randomized controlled trial with reliable follow-up should be performed in the future to confirm the feasibility.


Subject(s)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/diagnosis , Colposcopy/standards , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Guidelines as Topic , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Adult , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/pathology , China , Female , Human papillomavirus 16/isolation & purification , Human papillomavirus 18/isolation & purification , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Papillomavirus Infections/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/pathology
16.
Prev Med ; 151: 106596, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294325

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has a major impact on a wide range of health outcomes. Disruptions of elective health services related to cervical screening, management of abnormal screening test results, and treatment of precancers, may lead to increases in cervical cancer incidence and exacerbate existing health disparities. Modeling studies suggest that a short delay of cervical screening in subjects with previously negative HPV results has minor effects on cancer outcomes, while delay of management and treatment can lead to larger increases in cervical cancer. Several approaches can mitigate the effects of disruption of cervical screening and management. HPV-based screening has higher accuracy compared to cytology, and a negative HPV result provides longer reassurance against cervical cancer; further, HPV testing can be conducted from self-collected specimens. Self-collection expands the reach of screening to underserved populations who currently do not participate in screening. Self-collection and can also provide alternative screening approaches during the pandemic because testing can be supported by telehealth and specimens collected in the home, substantially reducing patient-provider contact and risk of COVID-19 exposure, and also expanding the reach of catch-up services to address backlogs of screening tests that accumulated during the pandemic. Risk-based management allows prioritizing management of patients at highest risk of cervical cancer while extending screening intervals for those at lowest risk. The pandemic provides important lessons for how to make cervical screening more resilient to disruptions and how to reduce cervical cancer disparities that may be exacerbated due to disruptions of health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Papillomaviridae , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e051118, 2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288397

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus is a common cancer among sexual minority men, especially HIV-positive sexual minority men; however, there is no evidenced-based national screening protocol for detection of anal precancers. Our objective is to determine compliance with annual anal canal self-sampling or clinician-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a prospective, randomised, two-arm clinical study to evaluate compliance with annual home-based versus clinic-based HPV DNA screening of anal canal exfoliated cells. The setting is primary care community-based clinics. Recruitment is ongoing for 400 HIV-positive and HIV-negative sexual minority men and transgender persons, aged >25 years, English or Spanish speaking, no current use of anticoagulants other than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and no prior diagnosis of anal cancer. Participants are randomised to either receive a swab in the mail for home-based collection of an anal canal specimen at 0 and 12 months (arm 1) or attend a clinic for clinician collection of an anal canal specimen at 0 and 12 months (arm 2). Persons will receive clinic-based Digital Anal Rectal Examinations and high-resolution anoscopy-directed biopsy to assess precancerous lesions, stratified by study arm. Anal exfoliated cells collected in the study are assessed for high-risk HPV persistence and host/viral methylation. The primary analysis will use the intention-to-treat principle to compare the proportion of those who comply with 0-month and 12-month sampling in the home-based and clinic-based arms. The a priori hypothesis is that a majority of persons will comply with annual screening with increased compliance among persons in the home-based arm versus clinic-based arm. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has been approved by the Medical College of Wisconsin Human Protections Committee. Results will be disseminated to communities where recruitment occurred and through peer-reviewed literature and conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03489707.


Subject(s)
Anus Neoplasms , Papillomavirus Infections , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Anal Canal , Anus Neoplasms/diagnosis , Anus Neoplasms/prevention & control , Early Detection of Cancer , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Wisconsin
19.
OMICS ; 25(6): 358-371, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243453

ABSTRACT

About a tenth of all cancers are caused by viruses or associated with viral infection. Recent global events including the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic means that human encounter with viruses is increased. Cancer development in individuals with viral infection can take many years after infection, demonstrating that the involvement of viruses in cancer development is a long and complex process. This complexity emanates from individual genetic heterogeneity and the many steps involved in cancer development owing to viruses. The process of tumorigenesis is driven by the complex interaction between several viral factors and host factors leading to the creation of a tumor microenvironment (TME) that is ideal and promotes tumor formation. Viruses associated with human cancers ensure their survival and proliferation through activation of several cellular processes including inflammation, migration, and invasion, resistance to apoptosis and growth suppressors. In addition, most human oncoviruses evade immune detection and can activate signaling cascades including the PI3K-Akt-mTOR, Notch and Wnt pathways associated with enhanced proliferation and angiogenesis. This expert review examines and synthesizes the multiple biological factors related to oncoviruses, and the signaling cascades activated by these viruses contributing to viral oncogenesis. In particular, I examine and review the Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomaviruses, and Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus in a context of cancer pathogenesis. I conclude with a future outlook on therapeutic targeting of the viruses and their associated oncogenic pathways within the TME. These anticancer strategies can be in the form of, but not limited to, antibodies and inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/virology , Neoplasms/virology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Retroviridae Infections/virology , Retroviridae/physiology , Sarcoma, Kaposi/virology , Tumor Virus Infections/virology , Alphapapillomavirus/physiology , Carcinogenesis , Cell Transformation, Viral , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/pathology , Herpesvirus 4, Human/physiology , Herpesvirus 8, Human/physiology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/therapy , Papillomavirus Infections/pathology , Retroviridae Infections/pathology , Sarcoma, Kaposi/pathology , Signal Transduction , Tumor Microenvironment , Tumor Virus Infections/pathology
20.
Prev Med ; 151: 106623, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240652

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has disrupted cervical screening in several countries, due to a range of policy-, health-service and participant-related factors. Using three well-established models of cervical cancer natural history adapted to simulate screening across four countries, we compared the impact of a range of standardised screening disruption scenarios in four countries that vary in their cervical cancer prevention programs. All scenarios assumed a 6- or 12-month disruption followed by a rapid catch-up of missed screens. Cervical screening disruptions could increase cervical cancer cases by up to 5-6%. In all settings, more than 60% of the excess cancer burden due to disruptions are likely to have occurred in women aged less than 50 years in 2020, including settings where women in their 30s have previously been offered HPV vaccination. Approximately 15-30% of cancers predicted to result from disruptions could be prevented by maintaining colposcopy and precancer treatment services during any disruption period. Disruptions to primary screening had greater adverse effects in situations where women due to attend for screening in 2020 had cytology (vs. HPV) as their previous primary test. Rapid catch-up would dramatically increase demand for HPV tests in 2021, which it may not be feasible to meet because of competing demands on the testing machines and reagents due to COVID tests. These findings can inform future prioritisation strategies for catch-up that balance potential constraints on resourcing with clinical need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mass Screening , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
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