Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 52
Filter
1.
Elife ; 122023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241077

ABSTRACT

Background: Home-based self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing may be an alternative for women not attending clinic-based cervical cancer screening. Methods: We assessed barriers to care and motivators to use at-home HPV self-sampling kits during the COVID-19 pandemic as part of a randomized controlled trial evaluating kit effectiveness. Participants were women aged 30-65 and under-screened for cervical cancer in a safety-net healthcare system. We conducted telephone surveys in English/Spanish among a subgroup of trial participants, assessed differences between groups, and determined statistical significance at p<0.05. Results: Over half of 233 survey participants reported that clinic-based screening (Pap) is uncomfortable (67.8%), embarrassing (52.4%), and discomfort seeing male providers (63.1%). The last two factors were significantly more prevalent among Spanish vs English speakers (66.4% vs 30% (p=0.000) and 69.9 vs 52.2% (p=0.006), respectively). Most women who completed the kit found Pap more embarrassing (69.3%), stressful (55.6%), and less convenient (55.6%) than the kit. The first factor was more prevalent among Spanish vs English speakers (79.6% vs 53.38%, p=0.001) and among patients with elementary education or below. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic influenced most (59.5%) to participate in the trial due to fear of COVID, difficulty making appointments, and ease of using kits. HPV self-sampling kits may reduce barriers among under-screened women in a safety-net system. Funding: This study is supported by a grant from the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparitie s (NIMHD, R01MD013715, PI: JR Montealegre). Clinical trial number: NCT03898167.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Humans , Female , Male , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Papillomaviridae , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Specimen Handling
2.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 974, 2023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Globally, both men and women have a 50% risk of being infected at least once in their life. HPV prevalence is among the highest in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), at an average of 24%. HPV causes different types of cancers, including cervical cancer (CC), which is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in SSA. HPV-vaccination has been proven to be effective in reducing HPV induced cancers. SSA countries are delayed in reaching the WHO's target of fully vaccinating 90% of girls within the age of 15 by 2030. Our systematic review aims to identify barriers and facilitators of HPV-vaccination in SSA to inform national implementation strategies in the region. METHODS: This is a mixed method systematic review based on the PRISMA statement and The Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual. Search strategies were adapted to each selected database: PubMed/MEDLINE, Livivo, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and African Journals Online for papers published in English, Italian, German, French and Spanish between 1 December 2011 and 31 December 2021. Zotero and Rayyan were the software used for data management. The appraisal was conducted by three independent reviewers. RESULTS: A total of 20 articles were selected for appraisal from an initial 536 articles. Barriers included: limited health system capacities, socio-economic status, stigma, fear and costs of vaccines, negative experience with vaccinations, COVID-19 pandemic, lack of correct information, health education (HE) and consent. Additionally, we found that boys are scarcely considered for HPV-vaccination by parents and stakeholders. Facilitators included: information and knowledge, policy implementation, positive experience with vaccinations, HE, stakeholders' engagement, women's empowerment, community engagement, seasonality, and target-oriented vaccination campaigns. CONCLUSIONS: This review synthesizes barriers and facilitators of HPV-vaccinations in SSA. Addressing these can contribute to the implementation of more effective HPV immunization programs targeted at eliminating CC in line with the WHO 90/70/90 strategy. REGISTRATION AND FUNDING: Protocol ID: CRD42022338609 registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO). Partial funds: German Centre for Infection research (DZIF) project NAMASTE: 8,008,803,819.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Male , Humans , Female , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1099552, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326367

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We explored priorities and perspectives on health policy and payer strategies for improving HPV vaccination rates in safety-net settings in the United States. Methods: We conducted qualitative interviews with policy and payer representatives in the greater Los Angeles region and state of New Jersey between December 2020 and January 2022. Practice Change Model domains guided data collection, thematic analysis, and interpretation. Results: Five themes emerged from interviews with 11 policy and 8 payer participants, including: (1) payer representatives not prioritizing HPV vaccination specifically in incentive-driven clinic metrics; (2) policy representatives noting region-specific HPV vaccine policy options; (3) inconsistent motivation across policy/payer groups to improve HPV vaccination; (4) targeting of HPV vaccination in quality improvement initiatives suggested across policy/payer groups; and (5) COVID-19 pandemic viewed as both barrier and opportunity for HPV vaccination improvement across policy/payer groups. Discussion: Our findings indicate opportunities for incorporating policy and payer perspectives into HPV vaccine improvement processes. We identified a need to translate effective policy and payer strategies, such as pay-for-performance programs, to improve HPV vaccination within safety-net settings. COVID-19 vaccination strategies and community efforts create potential policy windows for expanding HPV vaccine awareness and access.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , United States , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics , Reimbursement, Incentive , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Health Policy , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use
4.
Drugs ; 83(7): 621-632, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313605

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Specifically, our study aimed to test the hypothesis that HPV vaccination may also induce trained immunity, which would potentially reduce the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and improve clinical outcomes. BACKGROUND: Several vaccines have been reported to trigger non-specific immune reactions that could offer protection from heterologous infections. A recent case report showed that verruca vulgaris regressed after COVID-19, suggesting a possible negative association between COVID-19 and HPV infection. METHODS: We enrolled 57,584 women with HPV vaccination and compared them with propensity score-matched controls who never received HPV vaccination in relation to the risk of COVID-19 incidence. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses stratified by age, race, comorbid asthma, and obesity were performed. RESULTS: The risk of COVID-19 incidence was significantly lower in those who had recently received the HPV vaccine (within 1 year after HPV vaccination, aHR: 0.818, 95% CI 0.764-0.876; within 1-2 years after HPV vaccination, aHR: 0.890, 95% CI 0.824-0.961). Several limitations were recognized in this study, including residual confounding, problems of misclassification due to the use of electronic health record data, and that we were unable to keep track of the patients' HPV infection status and the HPV antibody levels in those who had received the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Recent HPV vaccination was associated with a lower risk of incident COVID-19 and hospitalization. Based on the promising protective effect of HPV vaccine shown in this study, these findings should be replicated in an independent dataset. Further studies are needed to provide a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms and the differences in risks among 2-, 4-, or 9-valent HPV vaccine recipients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , Female , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Viruses ; 15(4)2023 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303631

ABSTRACT

Patients with viral infections are susceptible to osteoporosis. This cohort study investigated the correlation between human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the risk of osteoporosis via 12,936 patients with new-onset HPV infections and propensity score-matched non-HPV controls enrolled in Taiwan. The primary endpoint was incident osteoporosis following HPV infections. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the effect of HPV infections on the risk of osteoporosis. Patients with HPV infections presented with a significantly high risk of osteoporosis (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.06-1.65) after adjusting for sex, age, comorbidities and co-medications. Subgroup analysis provided that populations at risk of HPV-associated osteoporosis were females (aHR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.04-1.71), those aged between 60 and 80 years (aHR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.01-2.08 for patients aged 60-70; aHR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.07-2.12 for patients aged 70-80), and patients with long-term use of glucocorticoids (aHR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.11-4.22). HPV-infected patients who did not receive treatments for HPV infections were at a greater risk (aHR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.09-1.80) of osteoporosis, while the risk of osteoporosis in those who received treatments for HPV infections did not reach statistical significance (aHR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.78-1.66). Patients with HPV infections presented with a high risk of subsequent osteoporosis. Treatments for HPV infections attenuated the risk of HPV-associated osteoporosis.


Subject(s)
Osteoporosis , Papillomavirus Infections , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Male , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Cohort Studies , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Osteoporosis/epidemiology , Incidence
6.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2202126, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302579

ABSTRACT

Prior to the COVID pandemic, Puerto Rico (PR) had one of the highest Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates in the United States. The COVID pandemic and administration of COVID vaccines might have impacted attitudes toward HPV vaccination. This study compared attitudes toward HPV and COVID vaccines with respect to school-entry policies among adults living in PR. A convenience sample of 222 adults (≥21 years old) completed an online survey from November 2021 to January 2022. Participants answered questions about HPV and COVID vaccines, attitudes toward vaccination policies for school-entry, and perceptions of sources of information. We assessed the magnitude of association between the agreement of school-entry policies for COVID and HPV vaccination by estimating the prevalence ratio (PRadjusted) with 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI). The most trusted source of information for HPV and COVID vaccines were healthcare providers (42% and 17%, respectively) and the CDC (35% and 55%, respectively), while the least trusted were social media (40% and 39%, respectively), and friends and family (23% n = 47, and 17% n = 33, respectively). Most participants agreed that HPV (76% n = 156) and COVID vaccines (69% n = 136) should be a school-entry requirement. Agreement with school policy requiring COVID vaccination was significantly associated with agreement of school policy requiring HPV vaccination (PRadjusted:1.96; 95% CI:1.48-2.61) after controlling for potential confounders. Adults living in PR have an overall positive attitude about mandatory HPV and COVID vaccination school-entry policies, which are interrelated. Further research should elucidate the implications of the COVID pandemic on HPV vaccine attitudes and adherence rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , Adult , United States , Young Adult , Puerto Rico/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Policy , Vaccination , Schools , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
7.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 160, 2023 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the general population is widely known, however, there are still few studies related to this infection in minority groups, Thus, the objective is to analyze the frequency of human papillomavirus and associated factors in quilombola and gypsy women. METHODS: Cross-sectional research with 145 quilombola and gypsy women from Caxias, Maranhão. Two Pap smear collections were performed and a questionnaire with 46 questions was applied between January, 2020 and March, 2021. Descriptive analysis and Odds Ratio with 95% confidence interval were performed. The research was approved by the ethics committee. RESULTS: There were 09 cases of atypia. The frequency of human papillomavirus was 41.37%, with a higher risk in quilombolas 55 (91.70%). Multiple infections were prevalent (53%) with high-risk genotypes 21 (35%). Types 16 and 18 together accounted for 42.85% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of human papillomavirus infection was higher than those recorded in the Northeast and Brazil, and therefore type 16 predominated. Due to limitations, the virus lineages and sublineages were not evaluated. Quilombola women had a higher rate of infection than gypsies.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections , Roma , Uterine Cervical Dysplasia , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Papillomaviridae/genetics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Dysplasia/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Minority Groups , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Brazil
8.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2163807, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2289184

ABSTRACT

HPV vaccination rates remain far below goal, leaving many adolescents unprotected against future HPV-related cancers. Starting HPV vaccine at age 9 may improve timely preteen vaccination. The "HPV Vax at 9" Quality Improvement intervention paired HPV vaccination with 9- and 10-year well child visits and was piloted at two pediatric clinics (n = 9 sites) in Washington between 2018 and 2022. Supporting interventions included standardized immunization schedule posters in exam rooms, electronic medical record supports, provider and staff training, strong provider recommendations, printed educational resources, and peer-to-peer champion coaching. Provider and clinic acceptance was high with HPV vaccine administration occurring at 68-86% of the 9- and 10-year well child visits. During the first year, HPV initiation rates at age 9-10 increased by 30% or more at each clinic. Sustained improvements in initiation and series completion were seen with completion at age 11-12 rising as much as 40% from 22 to 62%. Downward pressure of the COVID-19 pandemic on HPV vaccination rates was mitigated. Pairing HPV vaccine with 9- and 10-year well child visits, posting the standardized immunization schedule, and instituting EMR supports for HPV at 9 may be effective and sustainable strategies to simplify clinic workflows and increase timely HPV vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Humans , Child , Quality Improvement , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Vaccination
9.
J Low Genit Tract Dis ; 27(2): 168-172, 2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268064

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Isolation and school closure during the COVID-19 pandemic could decrease human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake and potentially increase future HPV-related morbidity among unvaccinated populations. The aim of our study was to investigate HPV vaccination rates in Israel during the pandemic. METHODS: The HPV vaccination rates were compared before and during the COVID-19 pandemic years (2020-2021). Data regarding HPV vaccination between 2015 and 2021 were extracted from the Israeli Ministry of Health online reports. Vaccination rates were compared with other childhood vaccines, given at similar ages. Israeli HPV vaccination rates were further compared with England and Australia, which have an established vaccination infrastructure. RESULTS: The average Israeli coverage of first-dose HPV vaccine was 60.2%, with significant variations from 2015 to 2021. During the pandemic years, first-dose vaccine coverage increased compared with the 3 previous years. The pandemic had also no apparent influence on other childhood vaccine uptake, even though adolescents in Israel missed many school days during this time. Average vaccine uptake in England and Australia was significantly higher than Israel ( p = .009); however, first-dose vaccination rates decreased considerably in England during 2020, to a nadir of 59%. The pandemic had little effect on HPV vaccination rates in Australia. CONCLUSIONS: Despite many school days missed, the COVID-19 pandemic did not result in a decrease in HPV vaccine uptake in Israel. The pandemic could prove a good opportunity to further educate the public regarding the importance of whole-population vaccination programs. Implementing catch-up vaccination programs may bridge "vaccination gaps" that may be caused by future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Humans , Child , Pandemics , Israel/epidemiology , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
10.
J Virol Methods ; 316: 114709, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257939

ABSTRACT

High-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) testing for primary cervical precancer screening offers an opportunity to improve screening in low-middle income countries (LMICs). This study aimed to compare the analytic performances of the AmpFire and MA-6000 platforms for hr-HPV DNA testing in three groups of women screened for hr-HPV types in Ghana: group 1 with 33 GeneXpert-archived ThinPrep/liquid-based samples subjected to both tests, group 2 with 50 AmpFire-archived dry brush samples subjected to MA-6000 testing, and group 3 involving 143 cotton swab samples simultaneously subjected to both tests without archiving. The overall agreement rates were 73 %, 92 %, and 84 %, for groups 1-3, respectively, and 84 % (95 % CI, 78.6-88.6) for the entire group. Neither AmpFire nor MA-6000 was more likely to test hr-HPV positive in all three groups and the combined group. Group 1 showed fair agreement without statistical significance (κ = 0.224, 95 % CI, -0.118 to 0.565), while group 3 showed significant moderate agreement (κ = 0.591, 95% CI, 0.442-0.741). Group 2 showed an almost perfect significant level of agreement (κ = 0.802; 95 % CI, 0.616-0.987). Thus, both platforms showed statistically significant moderate to near-perfect agreement for detecting hr-HPV in cervicovaginal samples, with variation according to archiving conditions and duration between sample collection and retesting. For LMICs using these platforms for COVID-19 testing, as the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, the platforms can become available for running other tests such as hr-HPV DNA testing for cervical precancer screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Dysplasia , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Dysplasia/diagnosis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Papillomaviridae/genetics , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , DNA, Viral/genetics , DNA, Viral/analysis , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(7): 2148825, 2022 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151604

ABSTRACT

It is unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake and which sociodemographic groups may have been most impacted. We aimed to assess differences in HPV vaccine uptake (initiation and completion) before and during the pandemic in the United States. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from the 2019 to 2020 National Immunization Surveys - Teen (NIS-Teen), comparing vaccine initiation and completion rates in 2019 vs. 2020, based on confirmed reports by a healthcare provider. Weighted logistic regression analysis estimated odds of vaccine initiation and completion for both adolescent and parental characteristics. There were 18,788 adolescents in 2019 and 20,162 in 2020. There was 3.6% increase in HPV vaccine initiation (71.5% vs. 75.1%) and a 4.4% in completion (54.2% vs. 58.6%) rates from 2019 to 2020. In 2020, Non-Hispanic White teens were significantly less likely to initiate (aOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.79) and complete (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.86) vaccine uptake compared with non-Hispanic Black teens. Additionally, teens who lived above the poverty line were also less likely to initiate HPV vaccination (aOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.80) or complete them (aOR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.90), compared to those who lived below the poverty line. During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, some historically advantaged socioeconomic groups such as those living above the poverty line were less likely to receive HPV vaccine. The impact of the pandemic on HPV vaccine uptake may transcend traditional access to care factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
13.
Lancet Glob Health ; 11(1): e48-e58, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2159976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts recommended that an extended interval of 3-5 years between the two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could be considered to alleviate vaccine supply shortages. However, three concerns have limited the introduction of extended schedules: girls could be infected between the two doses, the vaccination coverage for the second dose could be lower at ages 13-14 years than at ages 9-10 years, and identifying girls vaccinated with a first dose to give them the second dose could be difficult. Using mathematical modelling, we examined the potential effect of these concerns on the population-level impact and efficiency of extended dose HPV vaccination schedules. METHODS: We used HPV-ADVISE, an individual-based, transmission-dynamic model of multitype HPV infection and disease, calibrated to country-specific data for four low-income and middle-income countries (India, Viet Nam, Uganda, and Nigeria). For the extended dose scenarios, we varied the vaccination coverage of the second dose among girls previously vaccinated, the one-dose vaccine efficacy, and the one-dose vaccine duration of protection. We also examined a strategy in which girls aged 14 years were vaccinated irrespective of their previous vaccination status. We used a scenario of girls-only two-dose vaccination at age 9 years (vaccine=9 valent, vaccine-type efficacy=100%, duration of protection=lifetime, and coverage=80%) as our comparator. We estimated two outcomes: the relative reduction in the age-standardised cervical cancer incidence (population-level impact) and the number of cervical cancers averted per 100 000 doses (efficiency). FINDINGS: Our model projected substantial reductions in cervical cancer incidence over 100 years with the two-dose schedule (79-86% depending on the country), compared with no vaccination. Projections for the 5-year extended schedule, in which the second dose is given only to girls previously vaccinated at age 9 years, were similar to the current two-dose schedule, unless vaccination coverage of the second dose is very low (reductions in cervical cancer incidence of 71-78% assuming 30% coverage at age 14 years among girls vaccinated at age 9 years). However, when the dose at age 14 years is given to girls irrespective of vaccination status and assuming high vaccination coverage, the model projected a substantially greater reduction in cervical cancer incidence compared with the current two-dose schedule (reductions in cervical cancer incidence of 86-93% assuming 70% coverage at age 14 years, irrespective of vaccination status). Efficiency of the extended schedule was greater than the two-dose schedule, even with a drop in vaccination coverage. INTERPRETATION: The three concerns are unlikely to have a substantial effect on the population-level impact of extended dose schedules. Hence, extended dose schedules will likely provide similar cervical cancer reductions as two-dose schedules, while reducing the number of doses required in the short-term, providing a more efficient use of scarce resources, and offering a 5-year time window to reassess the necessity of the second dose. FUNDING: WHO, Canadian Institute of Health Research Foundation, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé, Digital Research Alliance of Canada, and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Developing Countries , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada , Cost-Benefit Analysis
14.
N Z Med J ; 135(1565): 83-94, 2022 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2112071

ABSTRACT

AIM: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth offer and contactless delivery of human papillomavirus (HPV) cervical screening self-test during the 2021 COVID-19 Level 4 lockdown in Auckland, New Zealand. METHODS: A small proof-of-concept study was undertaken to test telehealth approaches in never-screened, due or overdue Maori and Pacific women enrolled in a local Primary Health Organisation (PHO). Study invitation, active follow-up, nurse-led discussions, result notification and a post-test questionnaire were all delivered through telehealth. RESULTS: A sample of 197 eligible Maori and Pacific women were invited to take part, of which 86 women were successfully contacted. Sixty-six agreed to take part. Overall uptake was 61 samples returned (31.8%) and uptake of all contactable women was 70.9%. Six of the 61 HPV self-tests (9.8%) were positive, all for non 16/18 types, and were referred for cytology. Three had negative cytology results, and three with positive cytology results were referred for colposcopy. CONCLUSION: The offer of HPV self-testing during COVID-19 lockdown was both feasible and highly acceptable for Maori and Pacific women. Importantly, HPV self-testing via telehealth and mail-out, alongside other options, offers a potential pro-equity approach for addressing the impact of deferred screens due to COVID-19 and other longstanding coverage issues.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Telemedicine , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Self-Testing , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander , Feasibility Studies , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , New Zealand/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Papillomaviridae , Colposcopy , Mass Screening , Disease Outbreaks , Vaginal Smears
15.
Vaccine ; 40(46): 6575-6580, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We sought to evaluate the trends of HPV vaccination between 03/2019-09/2021 and whether the impact of the COVID pandemic on HPV vaccination varied by race/ethnicity and neighborhood deprivation index (NDI). METHODS: Electronic medical records at Kaiser Permanente Southern California were used to assess monthly volume of HPV vaccine doses administered among children aged 9-12.9yrs, and up-to-date coverage (% vaccinated) by age 13 between 03/2019-09/2021. Modified Poisson models were used to evaluate the interactions between race/ethnicity, NDI and the pandemic periods on HPV vaccine coverage. RESULTS: HPV vaccine doses administered in 2020/2021 have returned to the 2019 level after the initial drop. The average up-to-date coverage in 05/2021-09/2021 (54.8%) remained lower than the pre-pandemic level (58.5%). The associations between race/ethnicity, NDI and HPV vaccine coverage did not vary due to the pandemic. CONCLUSION: HPV vaccine promotion efforts are needed to address COVID-19 pandemic's lasting impact on HPV vaccination coverage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Ethnicity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Social Class , California/epidemiology
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(43): e31389, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097515

ABSTRACT

The COVID 19 pandemic is far from over, and vaccines remain important tool for fighting the disease. As the preventive effects of the COVID-19 vaccine emerges, it is likely that the perception of importance and safety of vaccines have a positive effect on the acceptance of other vaccines. However, it is still unclear how COVID-19 pandemic has affected the general vaccination perception and acceptance. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the perception of HPV vaccination. This study involved an offline survey of 161 women aged between 20 and 49 years who visited the gynecologic clinic at Chung-nam National University Sejong Hospital from January 2021 to June 2021. The questionnaire consists of items related to experience and knowledge of COVID-19 and HPV viruses, as well as attitudes toward HPV vaccination. Knowledge about COVID-19 virus and HPV correlated positively with their experiences (P = .011 and P = .045, respectively). Positive attitude was increased, and negative attitude was reduced toward HPV vaccination in the COVID-19 pandemic era. Participants stated that accurate information and cost reduction about HPV vaccine was needed to increase the HPV vaccination rate. During the COVID-19 pandemic era, positive attitudes towards HPV vaccination have tended to increase. To increase the HPV vaccination rate, public efforts are needed for further information and cost reduction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Vaccination , Papillomaviridae , Surveys and Questionnaires , Perception
17.
Prev Med ; 164: 107264, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086854

ABSTRACT

Worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted healthcare services, including cervical cancer management, and an increased burden for this condition is expected. This systematic review synthetizes the available evidence on the impact of the pandemic on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer. Searches were performed on PubMed, Embase, and Scopus for relevant studies on these topics with the purpose of comparing service access and care delivery before and during COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the methodological heterogeneity among the studies, findings were narratively discussed. Of the 715 screened titles and abstracts, 33 articles were included, corresponding to 42 reports that covered the outcomes of interest: vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) (6 reports), cancer screening (19), diagnosis (8), and treatment (8). Seven studies observed reductions in HPV vaccination uptake and coverage during COVID-19. Reports on cervical screening and cancer diagnosis activities showed a substantial impact of the pandemic on access to screening services and diagnostic procedures. All but one study that investigated cervical cancer treatment reported changes in the number of women with cervical lesions who received treatments, as well as treatment delay and interruption. With a major impact during the first wave in 2020, COVID-19 and restriction measures resulted in a substantial disruption in cervical cancer prevention and management, with declines in screening and delays in treatment. Taken together, findings from this systematic review calls for urgent policy interventions for recovering cervical cancer prevention and care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care
18.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(19): 7285-7289, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081432

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak as a global pandemic. COVID-19 pandemic has impacted health services, including immunization programs, with a consequent reduction in vaccination coverage in those categories for which the prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases is strongly recommended. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study on the general population and on PLWHs, comparing anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage data in 2019, before COVID-19 pandemic, and the 2020 data, after the announcement of the pandemic state and the lockdown and the implementation of restrictive measures to contain the contagion. RESULTS: Compared to 2019, 2020 data show a 42% reduction in HPV vaccine coverage in the general population and 36% in PLWHs. The greatest reduction in anti-HPV vaccination coverage occurred during periods of greatest restriction and mainly concerned the general population. CONCLUSIONS: The prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases remains essential. Above all, it is essential to increase and recover the anti-HPV vaccine coverage, in consideration of the data that show its preventive oncological efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases , Humans , Vaccination Coverage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Vaccination
19.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 6(4)2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077798

ABSTRACT

HPV vaccination is highly effective at preventing several types of cancer; however, vaccine uptake is suboptimal. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected participation in cancer prevention measures such as HPV vaccination. To assess changes and barriers to HPV vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a statewide cross-sectional survey of health-care professionals (HCPs) in Texas. Specifically, we evaluated changes observed by HCPs regarding HPV vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic: 1) hesitancy, 2) refusal, and 3) uptake. Decreased HPV vaccination uptake were reported by 19.3% of HCPs, whereas increased HPV vaccination hesitancy and refusal were reported by 17.1% and 14.8% of HCPs in Texas, respectively. The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on HPV vaccination. Our study identified barriers to HPV vaccination that are unique to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Parents , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination
20.
Cancer Sci ; 113(10): 3313-3320, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052328

ABSTRACT

Cervical cancer is caused by infections of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which can be prevented by vaccinations. In Japan, although about 3000 people die of cervical cancer annually, the HPV vaccination rate has remained extremely low in the eligible population since many Japanese have been concerned that "diverse symptoms," such as chronic pain, movement disorders, and cognitive impairment, may occur as adverse reactions after HPV vaccination. The concern has been raised by media coverage of the ongoing HPV vaccine lawsuits, in which the plaintiffs complained of their symptoms caused by HPV vaccination. The claims have been based on the alleged pathogenic findings in research articles on HPV vaccines, summarized in the document prepared by the plaintiffs' attorneys. We critically evaluated these articles, in which the authors proposed the following findings/hypothesis: (i) molecular mimicry between HPV L1 and human proteins leads to the production of cross-reactive antibodies; and (ii) HPV vaccine injection in mice causes damage in the brain, a mouse model for HPV vaccine associated neuro-immunopathic syndrome (HANS). We found that these hypotheses were based mainly on the findings from a few research groups and that all the articles had flaws in the method, result, or discussion sections. Our current evaluation should help better understand the validity of the findings, which have been often misunderstood as the truth by the general public. We propose to accumulate high-quality data on potential adverse events following HPV vaccination and to continue critically evaluating them.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Animals , Female , Humans , Mice , Molecular Mimicry , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Vaccination/adverse effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL