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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e062050, 2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784843

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Persistent infection with HPV can result in cancers affecting men and, especially, women. Lower uptake exists by area and different population groups. Increasing parental confidence about, and adolescent access to, the universal HPV vaccination programme may help reduce inequalities in uptake. However, the evidence-base for interventions to address uptake for schools-based HPV vaccination programmes is currently lacking. This study protocol outlines how a multicomponent intervention to address this evidence gap will be codesigned with parents. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The proposed research will be undertaken in localities covered by two immunisation teams in London and the south-west of England. The 'person-based approach' to intervention development will be followed. In the first phase, an exploratory qualitative study will be undertaken with key stakeholders (n=8) and parents (n=40) who did not provide consent for their adolescent child to be vaccinated. During the interviews, parents' views on ways to improve parental confidence about, and adolescents' access to, HPV vaccination will be sought. The findings will be used to inform the co-design of a preliminary plan for a targeted, multicomponent intervention. In the second phase, at least two parent working groups (n=8) will be convened and will work with creative designers to co-design communication materials aimed at increasing parents' confidence in vaccination. At least two workshops with each parent group will be organised to obtain feedback on the intervention plan and communication materials to ensure they are fit for purpose. These findings will inform a protocol for a future study to test the effectiveness of the intervention at increasing HPV vaccination uptake. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The National Health Services Research Ethics Service and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Observational / Interventions Research Ethics Committee provided approvals for the study (reference 22/SW/0003 & 26902, respectively). We will work with parent advisory groups to inform our dissemination strategy and co-present our findings (eg, at community events or through social media). We will disseminate our findings with academics and healthcare professionals through webinars and academic conferences, as well as peer-reviewed publications.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Child , England , Female , Humans , Male , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Parents , Vaccination
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 802947, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779968

ABSTRACT

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the leading cause of ano-genital cancers globally with cervical cancer as the top cause of cancer- related deaths in women. Over 90% of these deaths occur in low income countries where cancer control strategies remain inadequate. HPV vaccination provides protection against HPV types 16 and 18 which are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. The optimal age of vaccination is in the early adolescent period, before sexual debut with possible HPV infection. Studies have shown that children residing in low income settlements are at risk of early initiation of sexual activity. Adolescent vaccination programs would provide an avenue to link other health promotion strategies targeting this age group that has hitherto been left out of many health interventions in 2019, Kenya introduced HPV vaccine to be given to 10 year old girls. Uptake has been sub-optimal with only 33% of targeted population receiving the first dose in 2020 and 16% returning for the 2nd dose. While disruption of immunization programs by the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to the low coverage, other factors such as low demand fuelled by misinformation have also played a role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Vaccination
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 801984, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776001

ABSTRACT

Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine for adolescents was recommended as an effective prevention strategy of HPV-related cancers. In Vietnam, HPV vaccination has not been introduced to male adolescent. This study was conducted to examine the acceptance of having boys vaccinated against HPV and its underlying reasoning, and to identify their parent's willingness to pay (WTP) for HPV vaccination in central Vietnam. 785 parents of boys were directly interviewed based on a structured questionnaire. Parent's acceptability of HPV vaccine for their sons was identified by one question with response on 3-point scale (agree, don't know, and disagree). Multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine contributing factors to participant's acceptance. Bidding game method was applied to elicit WTP values for HPV vaccination with initial bid of 161.2 USD. The results showed that 49.2% of parents agreed to have their sons vaccinated against HPV. Factors that influenced parent's acceptance including son's age older than 12 years (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.08-1.98); being eldest son (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.13-2.19), being mother (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.01-1.91), parents with high educational level (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.11-2.47) and their knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.23-2.65). Average WTP value for full doses of HPV vaccine was 137.5 USD, ranging between 9 USD and 188.3 USD. Parents' knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine was the only factor affecting WTP value (Rho: 0.11; p-value: 0.030). The findings suggest a strategy be introduced for HPV vaccination to male adolescents in Vietnam.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Vaccination , Adolescent , Alphapapillomavirus , Child , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Papillomaviridae , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/economics , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Parents , Vaccination/economics , Vaccination/psychology , Vietnam
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e058510, 2022 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774967

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Men who have sex with men who use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not traditionally been targets for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine programmes, despite their high risk for HPV-related cancers and HPV vaccine being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for people up to age 45. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes and barriers towards HPV vaccine for adult PrEP users in the primary care context. METHODS: Semistructured phone interviews of 16 primary care patients taking PrEP in the Kansas City metropolitan area were conducted, with interviews assessing HPV vaccination status, and attitudes, beliefs and perceived barriers surrounding HPV vaccine. Interview notes were open-coded by student authors, and themes were generated through code review and consensus. Data were then analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The results showed that most patients believed that preventative health was important and felt the HPV vaccine was important. Most patients were open to vaccination if recommended by their primary care physician and covered by insurance. Most participants believed HPV infection to be far worse in women, and there were gaps in knowledge surrounding HPV and its effects in men. CONCLUSIONS: While more research is needed to better understand facilitators of a linkage between PrEP and HPV vaccine in clinical settings for groups at high risk for HPV-related cancers, getting primary care providers involved in educating high-risk patients about the importance of HPV vaccination and actively recommending the vaccine to those patients has the potential to prevent HPV-related cancers.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Adult , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Kansas , Male , Middle Aged , Missouri , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Primary Health Care , Vaccination
6.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 19: E15, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771674

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has prevented many adolescents from receiving their vaccines, including the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, on time. However, little is known about the impact of the pandemic on implementation of clinic-level evidence-based interventions (EBIs) that help to improve HPV vaccine uptake. In this qualitative study, we explored the pandemic's impact on EBI implementation and HPV vaccine delivery. METHODS: During August-November 2020, we interviewed clinic managers in a rural, midwestern state about their experiences implementing EBIs for HPV vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. We used a multipronged sampling approach with both stratified and purposive sampling to recruit participants from Vaccines for Children clinics. We then conducted a thematic analysis of transcripts. RESULTS: In interviews (N = 18), 2 primary themes emerged: decreased opportunities for HPV vaccination and disruption to HPV-related implementation work. Most participants reported decreases in opportunities to vaccinate caused by structural changes in how they delivered care (eg, switched to telehealth visits) and patient fear of exposure to COVID-19. Disruptions to EBI implementation were primarily due to logistical challenges (eg, decreases in staffing) and shifting priorities. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, clinics struggled to provide routine care, and as a result, many adolescents missed HPV vaccinations. To ensure these adolescents do not fall behind on this vaccine series, providers and researchers will need to recommit to EBI implementation and use existing strategies to promote vaccination. In the long term, improvements are needed to make EBI implementation more resilient to ensure that progress does not come to a halt in future pandemic events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Vaccination
7.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 1734-1749, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767556

ABSTRACT

Religion is a complex and sociocultural driver of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination decisions, but its exact role has been mixed/unclear. We used a cross-sectional study of 342 Christian parents to examine the associations between the three domains of religiosity (organizational, non-organizational, and intrinsic) and the intention to (i) seek HPV information and (ii) receive the HPV vaccine. Organizational religiosity was the only domain that was positively associated with information-seeking intention regardless of the type of covariates included. Mixed findings in the association between religiosity and HPV vaccination decisions may depend on the religiosity domain being assessed.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Christianity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Parents , Vaccination
9.
Front Immunol ; 13: 782198, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699887

ABSTRACT

Misunderstanding temporal coincidence of adverse events during mass vaccination and invalid assessment of possible safety concerns have negative effects on immunization programs, leading to low immunization coverage. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the incidence rates of GBS that are temporally associated with viral vaccine administration but might not be attributable to the vaccines. By literature search in Embase and PubMed, we included 48 publications and 2,110,441,600 participants. The pooled incidence rate of GBS was 3.09 per million persons (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.67 to 3.51) within six weeks of vaccination, equally 2.47 per 100,000 person-year (95%CI: 2.14 to 2.81). Subgroup analyses illustrated that the pooled rates were 2.77 per million persons (95%CI: 2.47 to 3.07) for individuals who received the influenza vaccine and 2.44 per million persons (95%CI: 0.97 to 3.91) for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, respectively. Our findings evidence the GBS-associated safety of virus vaccines. We present a reference for the evaluation of post-vaccination GBS rates in mass immunization campaigns, including the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/epidemiology , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , Mass Vaccination/adverse effects , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Alphapapillomavirus/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
10.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667339

ABSTRACT

In 2014 and 2021, two nucleic-acid vaccine candidates named MAV E2 and VGX-3100 completed phase III clinical trials in Mexico and U.S., respectively, for patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). These well-tolerated but still unlicensed vaccines encode distinct HPV antigens (E2 versus E6+E7) to elicit cell-mediated immune responses; their clinical efficacy, as measured by HSIL regression or cure, was modest when compared with placebo or surgery (conization), but both proved highly effective in clearing HPV infection, which should help further optimize strategies for enhancing vaccine immunogenicity, toward an ultimate goal of preventing malignancies in millions of patients who are living with persistent, oncogenic HPV infection but are not expected to benefit from current, prophylactic vaccines. The major roadblocks to a highly efficacious and practical product remain challenging and can be classified into five categories: (i) getting the vaccines into the right cells for efficient expression and presentation of HPV antigens (fusion proteins or epitopes); (ii) having adequate coverage of oncogenic HPV types, beyond the current focus on HPV-16 and -18; (iii) directing immune protection to various epithelial niches, especially anogenital mucosa and upper aerodigestive tract where HPV-transformed cells wreak havoc; (iv) establishing the time window and vaccination regimen, including dosage, interval and even combination therapy, for achieving maximum efficacy; and (v) validating therapeutic efficacy in patients with poor prognosis because of advanced, recurrent or non-resectable malignancies. Overall, the room for improvements is still large enough that continuing efforts for research and development will very likely extend into the next decade.


Subject(s)
Cancer Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Papillomavirus Infections/therapy , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy , Vaccines, DNA/therapeutic use , Animals , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/virology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix/therapy , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , /therapeutic use
11.
Vaccine ; 40(9): 1246-1252, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Between May 2005 and March 2007, three vaccines were recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for routine use in adolescents in the United States: quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY), tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), and human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV). Understanding historical adolescent vaccination patterns may inform future vaccination coverage efforts for these and emerging adolescent vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: This was a descriptive, retrospective cohort study. All vaccines administered to adolescents aged 11 through 18 years in the Vaccine Safety Datalink population between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2016 were examined. Vaccination coverage was assessed by study year for ≥1 dose Tdap or Td, ≥1 dose Tdap, ≥1 dose MenACWY, ≥1 dose HPV, and ≥3 dose HPV. The proportion of vaccine visits with concurrent vaccination (≥2 vaccines administered at the same visit) was calculated by sex and study year. The most common vaccine combinations administered in the study population were described by sex for two time periods: 2007-2010 and 2011-2016. RESULTS: The number of 11-18-year-olds in the study population averaged 522,565 males and 503,112 females per study year. Between January 2007 and December 2016 there were 4,884,553 vaccine visits in this population (45% among males). The overall proportion of concurrent vaccine visits among males was 43% (33-61% by study year). Among females, 39% of all vaccine visits included concurrent vaccination (32-48% by study year). Vaccine coverage for Tdap, MenACWY, and 1- and 3-dose HPV increased across the study period. A wide variety of vaccine combinations were administered among both sexes and in both time periods. CONCLUSIONS: The high vaccine uptake and multitude of vaccine combinations administered concurrently in the adolescent population of the Vaccine Safety Datalink provide historical patterns with which to compare future adolescent vaccination campaigns.


Subject(s)
Vaccination , Vaccines , Adolescent , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Male , Meningococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage , Meningococcal Vaccines/adverse effects , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination/trends , Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccines/adverse effects
12.
Am J Prev Med ; 62(4): 538-547, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1663375

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A total of 3 vaccines are recommended for U.S. adolescents: tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis; meningococcal conjugate; and human papillomavirus. To understand the disparities in vaccine availability and hesitancy, adolescent-, household-, and area-level characteristics associated with patterns of vaccine coverage are described. METHODS: In 2020-2021, the authors generated national estimates among 8 possible combinations of vaccine coverage and identified the associated characteristics using 2015-2017 National Immunization Survey-Teen for male and female adolescents aged 13-17 years (N=63,299) linked to area (ZIP code) characteristics. Next, the factors associated with a missed opportunity for human papillomavirus vaccine (i.e., receipt of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis and meningococcal conjugate only compared with coverage of all the 3 vaccines) were identified using logistic regression. RESULTS: Most U.S. adolescents received all the 3 vaccines (42.9%) or tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis and meningococcal conjugate only (32.1%); fewer received no vaccines (7.7%) or tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis only (6.6%); and the remainder received some combination of 1-2 vaccines. Missed opportunities for human papillomavirus vaccination were more likely among adolescents who were male, were of White race, were uninsured, were in middle-income households, and were living in rural areas and were less likely among adolescents who were older, who were Medicaid insured, whose parents completed surveys in Spanish, who were in poverty-level households, and who were living in high-poverty areas. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial number of U.S. adolescents are not fully vaccinated, and coverage varies by vaccine type, population, and place. Providers should routinely stock all the 3 vaccines and promote simultaneous, same-day vaccination to avoid missed vaccine opportunities. More research and interventions are needed to understand and modify patient, provider, payer, vaccine supply/storage, or other reasons for suboptimal coverage of all the recommended vaccines.


Subject(s)
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines , Meningococcal Vaccines , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Male , Medically Uninsured , United States , Vaccination
13.
Prev Med ; 156: 106960, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655254

ABSTRACT

The global confrontation with COVID-19 has not only diverted current healthcare resources to deal with the infection but has also resulted in increased resources in the areas of testing and screening, as well as educating most of the global public of the benefits of vaccination. When the COVID-19 pandemic eventually recedes, the opportunity must not be missed to ensure that these newly created resources are maintained and redeployed for use in testing and immunisation against other vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. A notable example is infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), the commonest sexually transmitted human virus and the leading cause of a variety of cancers in both men and women, such as cervical, head and neck, anal, vaginal, vulvar and penile cancers. The most important is cervical cancer, the objective of the global elimination goals targeting the vaccination of young female and male adolescents, screening all women and treatment of all infected women. As the campaigns to control SARS-CoV-2, the eradication of HPV-induced cancers also relies on effective prevention and control programs. The lessons learned and the technical, logistical and human resources which have been established to combat COVID-19 by vaccination and testing must be applied to the eradication of other infections which affect the global population. This commentary summarizes the opportunities that the COVID-19 pandemic has created for HPV prevention and control, lists the already available tools for HPV control, and emphasizes the potential public health threats amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Papillomaviridae , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Vaccination
14.
Euro Surveill ; 26(50)2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631277

ABSTRACT

While many European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries recently expanded human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to boys, HPV vaccine supply is currently limited for girls in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) that are severely affected by HPV.Globally, about 50% of countries have introduced HPV vaccination. Some LMIC with high burden of cervical cancer have not yet introduced HPV vaccination, or are reaching suboptimal vaccination coverage. While WHO issued a call for cervical cancer elimination in 2018, a global shortage of HPV vaccines is currently predicted to last at least until 2024.We reviewed national policies of EU/EEA countries and recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunisation to discuss current challenges and dose-sparing options. Several EU/EEA countries have extended HPV vaccination to boys and the European Cancer Organisation has issued a resolution for elimination of all HPV-associated cancers in both sexes. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control concluded in its 2020 guidance that cost-effectiveness of extending routine vaccination to boys depends on several context-specific factors. The extension of HPV vaccination to boys in EU/EEA countries may affect global availability of vaccines. Temporary dose-sparing options could be considered during the COVID-19 post-pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , European Union , Female , Humans , Immunization , Male , Morals , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Vaccination
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625776

ABSTRACT

Social media platforms are widely used for spreading vaccine-related information. The objectives of this paper are to characterize Polish-language human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination discourse on Facebook and to trace the possible influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on changes in the HPV vaccination debate. A quantitative and qualitative analysis was carried out based on data collected with a tool for internet monitoring and social media analysis. We found that the discourse about HPV vaccination bearing negative sentiment is centralized. There are leaders whose posts generate the bulk of anti-vaccine traffic and who possess relatively greater capability to influence recipients' opinions. At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic vaccination debate intensified, but there is no unequivocal evidence to suggest that interest in the HPV vaccination topic changed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Social Media , Humans , Language , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
18.
J Low Genit Tract Dis ; 26(1): 13-19, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592137

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term sustainability of a multilevel intervention and the COVID-19 pandemic impact on adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2016, a pediatric and family medicine practice within a federally qualified health center completed a multilevel intervention, Development of Systems and Education for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. We examined the intervention impact on HPV vaccine initiation and completion rates among adolescents 10-18 years between March 2016 and October 2020. We determined the total number of HPV vaccine doses administered monthly. Data were plotted on statistical process control charts. RESULTS: Vaccine initiation increased from an average of 14% to an average of 42% for 10-year-old patients and from an average of 72% to an average of 92% for 11- to 12-year-old patients between March 2016 and January 2017 and remained stable through March 2020. Complete vaccination by age 13 years increased from 62% to 88% through October 2020. CONCLUSIONS: This intervention led to continued improvement for on-time HPV vaccination coverage 4 years after intervention completion.Clinical Trial Registration: This trial has been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT02812732).


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus , COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
19.
Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci ; 188(1): 101-134, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588618

ABSTRACT

Although concerns about politicization of health and science are not new, the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified attention to how political disagreement over scientific guidelines and recommendations might influence attitudes and behaviors about the health topics in question and might even spill or carry over to affect other attitudes important to public health. The literature employs differing definitions of politicization-at times referring to controversy in the public sphere, at others referring to the exploitation of the uncertainty inherent in science, and at still others referring to whether the issue enters political discourse-all of which are viewed as distinct dimensions by the public. What is not known is how these different aspects of politicization influence public attitudes about the health topics and or broader attitudes about scientific guidelines, and-assuming adverse effects-what strategies might be effective at mitigating the consequences. This paper draws on a survey experiment of 3012U.S. respondents fielded in summer 2020 that was designed as a pilot study to assess the effects of different dimensions of politicization. Findings do not suggest that one type of politicization is necessarily more pernicious than the others. In fact, all types of politicization increased negative emotional responses and confusion, both with respect to the health topic in question (HPV vaccine and COVID-19) but also on other domains, although opinions about policy were unaffected. The findings also suggest that inoculation may have potential as a messaging strategy for blunting the adverse effects of exposure to politicization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pilot Projects , Politics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Adv Nurs ; 78(5): 1366-1376, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528388

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Thousands of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers every year might be prevented through increased receipt of vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV). This project aimed to (1) increase the rate of HPV vaccination status assessment, and (2) improve HPV vaccine initiation and completion rates among 18 to 26-year-old patients in the family practice setting. DESIGN: Quality improvement project, pre/post intervention design. METHODS: This project implemented the HIYA! (HPV Immunization among Young Adults) Intervention in a private sports and family practice in central New Jersey. HIYA! implemented 10 pre-, during, and post-visit outcome measures during every family medicine visit with an 18 to 26-year-old patient for HPV. Data collection involved retrospective chart review of every eligible patient during the 12-week implementation period from 17 August to 06 November 2020 and during the same 12-week control period in 2019. RESULTS/FINDINGS: One hundred sixteen charts from 2019 and 129 charts from 2020 were reviewed for assessment of HPV vaccination status and HPV vaccine initiation and/or completion. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that participants in the control group were 84% less likely to be assessed for HPV vaccination status and were 91% less likely to initiate and complete HPV vaccination compared with the intervention group. CONCLUSION: This QI project found HIYA! to be an effective and feasible strategy to improve HPV vaccination rates among 18 to 26-year-old patients in a family practice setting. IMPACT: The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States, and causes thousands of cancers annually. Although vaccination against HPV can prevent these cancers, vaccination rates remain low, particularly among young adults ages 18 to 26 years. The positive impact of HIYA! was evident based on its success despite the unique challenges presented during the implementation period due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Adult , Family Practice , Humans , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies , United States , Vaccination , Young Adult
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