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1.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 365-375, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490458

ABSTRACT

Concerns about vaccine safety are an important reason for vaccine hesitancy, however, limited information is available on whether common adverse reactions following vaccination affect the immune response. Data from three clinical trials of recombinant vaccines were used in this post hoc analysis to assess the correlation between inflammation-related solicited adverse reactions (ISARs, including local pain, redness, swelling or induration and systematic fever) and immune responses after vaccination. In the phase III trial of the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cecolin®), the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) for IgG anti-HPV-16 and -18 (P<0.001) were significantly higher in participants with any ISAR following vaccination than in those without an ISAR. Local pain, induration, swelling and systemic fever were significantly correlated with higher GMCs for IgG anti-HPV-16 and/or anti-HPV-18, respectively. Furthermore, the analyses of the immunogenicity bridging study of Cecolin® and the phase III trial of a hepatitis E vaccine yielded similar results. Based on these results, we built a scoring model to quantify the inflammation reactions and found that the high score of ISAR indicates the strong vaccine-induced antibody level. In conclusion, this study suggests inflammation-related adverse reactions following vaccination potentially indicate a stronger immune response.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis E/immunology , Human papillomavirus 16/immunology , Human papillomavirus 18/immunology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Hepatitis E/prevention & control , Hepatitis E/virology , Human papillomavirus 16/genetics , Human papillomavirus 18/genetics , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Papillomavirus Vaccines/genetics , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/adverse effects , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/genetics , Young Adult
2.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Efficacy for cervical cancer prevention of opportunistic HPV vaccination in post-pubertal girls is lower than in 11-year-olds. METHODS: Women born between 1986 and 1992 vaccinated at 15-25 years of age (at least one dose of 4-valent HPV vaccine) and screened at 24-27 years of age were included. Frequency of opportunistic vaccination, overall and by birth cohort, was calculated; screening outcomes were compared between vaccinated and unvaccinated women. RESULTS: Overall, 4718 (4.9%) HPV-vaccinated, and 91,512 unvaccinated, women were studied. The frequency of vaccination increased by birth cohort, ranging between 1.8% and 9.8%; age at vaccination decreased progressively by birth cohort (p < 0.0001). Participation in screening was 60.8% among vaccinated, and 56.6% among unvaccinated, women (p < 0.0001). Detection rates (DR) for high-grade lesions were lower in vaccinated women (2.11‰ vs. 3.85‰ in unvaccinated, for CIN3+, p = 0.24; 0.0‰ vs. 0.22‰ for cancer). The DR of CIN3+ increased with age at vaccination, scoring respectively 0.0‰, 0.83‰, and 4.68‰ for women vaccinated when they were 15-16, 17-20, and 21-25 years old (p = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to unvaccinated women, higher compliance with cervical cancer screening invitation and lower CIN3+ DR among vaccinated women was observed. Age at vaccination was inversely correlated to vaccination efficacy.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Screening , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(35): 1183-1190, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395455

ABSTRACT

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that adolescents aged 11-12 years routinely receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap); meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY); and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Catch-up vaccination is recommended for hepatitis B (HepB); hepatitis A (HepA); measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); and varicella (VAR) vaccines for adolescents whose childhood vaccinations are not current. Adolescents are also recommended to receive a booster dose of MenACWY vaccine at age 16 years, and shared clinical decision-making is recommended for the serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB) for persons aged 16-23 years (1). To estimate coverage with recommended vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2020 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) for 20,163 adolescents aged 13-17 years.* Coverage with ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine increased from 71.5% in 2019 to 75.1% in 2020. The percentage of adolescents who were up to date† with HPV vaccination (HPV UTD) increased from 54.2% in 2019 to 58.6% in 2020. Coverage with ≥1 dose of Tdap, ≥1 dose (and among adolescents aged 17 years, ≥2 doses) of MenACWY remained similar to coverage in 2019 (90.1%, 89.3%, and 54.4% respectively). Coverage increased for ≥2 doses of HepA among adolescents aged 13-17 years and ≥1 dose of MenB among adolescents aged 17 years. Adolescents living below the federal poverty level§ had higher HPV vaccination coverage than adolescents living at or above the poverty level. Adolescents living outside a metropolitan statistical area (MSA)¶ had lower coverage with ≥1 MenACWY and ≥1 HPV dose, and a lower proportion being HPV UTD than adolescents in MSA principal cities. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted routine immunization services. Results from the 2020 NIS-Teen reflect adolescent vaccination coverage before the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2020 NIS-Teen data could be used to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on catch-up vaccination but not on routine adolescent vaccination because adolescents included in the survey were aged ≥13 years, past the age when most routine adolescent vaccines are recommended, and most vaccinations occurred before March 2020. Continued efforts to reach adolescents whose routine medical care has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic are necessary to protect persons and communities from vaccine-preventable diseases and outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Meningococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Advisory Committees , COVID-19/epidemiology , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Vaccines, Conjugate/administration & dosage
5.
Am J Public Health ; 111(6): 1035-1039, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216999

ABSTRACT

We report on data we collected from a 2018 survey examining jails' human papillomavirus virus vaccine delivery capacity and on a secondary analysis we conducted to describe factors similarly associated with delivery planning for the COVID-19 vaccine. We provide recommendations for delivering the COVID-19 vaccine in jails, based on evidence from Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, and Missouri. Our key finding is that jails have limited staff to implement vaccination and will require collaboration between jail administrators, jail medical staff, and local health departments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Personnel , Immunization Programs , Jails , Public Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Iowa , Kansas , Male , Missouri , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage
6.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 715-719, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211555

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted routine health care services including immunization delivery. The most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States is the human papillomavirus (HPV), and its sequelae may be prevented by vaccination. Sequelae that can develop if one's immune system is not able to clear the infection include warts, precancerous lesions, and cancer. The American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists (ACOG) reports almost everyone who is sexually active will encounter the virus at some time during their life. Most of the estimated 79 million infections occur among people who are in their late teens or early 20s. Since 2006, there has been a vaccine available to prevent HPV infections in both males and females; however, administration of this vaccine has only been about half the rate of other vaccines and vaccine hesitancy may play a role. Public health nurses are vital in providing accurate and nonjudgmental vaccine education to their clients, especially unaccompanied minors seeking care in public health department clinics. This paper will explore the recommendations for providing this vaccine as well as a snapshot of current practice in two health departments in the Southeast region of the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Promotion , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses, Public Health , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Public Health Administration , Southeastern United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6): 378-384, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1134603

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to assess the completeness and timeliness of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme in Friuli Venezia Giulia (FVG) Region (Northern Italy), notably by monitoring 2-dose coverage among girls before they turn 15 years old (referred to as "at 15") in each year between 2009 and 2018 and making a preliminary evaluation of coverage among boys at 13 years in 2016-2018. DESIGN: retrospective study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: for each vaccine recipient, demographic information and history of HPV vaccine uptake from the digital FVG Vaccination Registry updated as of 31.12.2018 were extracted. Numerator data comprised all doses allocated to FVG residents. Age-specific denominators were derived from the FVG census in each examined year. Coverage estimates for the year 2018 were also provided by number of doses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: coverage for a full course of HPV vaccine, defined as 2 doses in girls and boys younger than age 15 years but 3 doses in less young women. RESULTS: In FVG 52,217 females had received >=1 dose since 2008 and 12,152 males since 2015. >=2-dose coverage in girls at 15 increased from 42% in 2009 to 76% in 2015 and slightly declined afterwards (69% in 2018). In 2008, 3-dose coverage was 65%, 74%, and 59% in females aged 16-17, 18-19, and 20-26 years, respectively. In the same year, 2-dose coverage in boys at 13 years was 54%, similar to the coverage in girls at 13 years (57%). CONCLUSIONS: this paper shows the achievements of routine and catch-up HPV vaccination in FVG. While coverage in girls at 15 years of age peaked in 2015 and slightly diminished in subsequent years, the coverage in boys at 13 in 2018 had already approached the coverage in same-age girls (57%). On account of the signs of weakening in girls' coverage, campaigns in support to HPV vaccination must be repeated, especially in favour of the most cost-effective group, i.e., girls before 15 years of age. The heavy burden posed by the COVID-19 emergency on other prevention-related activities makes a better targeted use of HPV vaccination even more necessary.


Subject(s)
Immunization Programs/statistics & numerical data , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Young Adult
9.
Crit Rev Eukaryot Gene Expr ; 31(1): 61-69, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105917

ABSTRACT

The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine is the world's first proven and effective vaccine to prevent cancers in males and females when administered pre-exposure. Like most of the US, barely half of Vermont teens are up-to-date with the vaccination, with comparable deficits in New Hampshire and Maine. The rates for HPV vaccine initiation and completion are as low as 33% in rural New England. Consequently, there is a compelling responsibility to communicate its importance to unvaccinated teenagers before their risk for infection increases. Messaging in rural areas promoting HPV vaccination is compromised by community-based characteristics that include access to appropriate medical care, poor media coverage, parental and peer influence, and skepticism of science and medicine. Current strategies are predominantly passive access to literature and Internet-based information. Evidence indicates that performance-based messaging can clarify the importance of HPV vaccination to teenagers and their parents in rural areas. Increased HPV vaccination will significantly contribute to the prevention of a broadening spectrum of cancers. Reducing rurality-based inequities is a public health priority. Development of a performance-based peer-communication intervention can capture a window of opportunity to provide increasingly effective and sustained HPV protection. An effective approach can be partnering rural schools and regional health teams with a program that is nimble and scalable to respond to public health policies and practices compliant with COVID-19 pandemic-related modifications on physical distancing and interacting in the foreseeable future.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Physical Distancing , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/methods , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , New England/epidemiology , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Int J Cancer ; 148(2): 277-284, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635339

ABSTRACT

The age-standardised incidence of cervical cancer in Europe varies widely by country (between 3 and 25/100000 women-years) in 2018. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage is low in countries with the highest incidence and screening performance is heterogeneous among European countries. A broad group of delegates of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations endorse the principles of the WHO call to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health problem, also in Europe. All European nations should, by 2030, reach at least 90% HPV vaccine coverage among girls by the age of 15 years and also boys, if cost-effective; they should introduce organised population-based HPV-based screening and achieve 70% of screening coverage in the target age group, providing also HPV testing on self-samples for nonscreened or underscreened women; and to manage 90% of screen-positive women. To guide member states, a group of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations engage to assist in the rollout of a series of concerted evidence-based actions. European health authorities are requested to mandate a group of experts to develop the third edition of European Guidelines for Quality Assurance of Cervical Cancer prevention based on integrated HPV vaccination and screening and to monitor the progress towards the elimination goal. The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, having interrupted prevention activities temporarily, should not deviate stakeholders from this ambition. In the immediate postepidemic phase, health professionals should focus on high-risk women and adhere to cost-effective policies including self-sampling.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus/immunology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Public Health/methods , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Alphapapillomavirus/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Early Detection of Cancer , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Public Health/standards , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/immunology , Vaccination/methods , World Health Organization , Young Adult
13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(33): 1109-1116, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724362

ABSTRACT

Three vaccines are recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for routine vaccination of adolescents aged 11-12 years to protect against 1) pertussis; 2) meningococcal disease caused by types A, C, W, and Y; and 3) human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers (1). At age 16 years, a booster dose of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) is recommended. Persons aged 16-23 years can receive serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB), if determined to be appropriate through shared clinical decision-making. CDC analyzed data from the 2019 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) to estimate vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13-17 years in the United States.* Coverage with ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine increased from 68.1% in 2018 to 71.5% in 2019, and the percentage of adolescents who were up to date† with the HPV vaccination series (HPV UTD) increased from 51.1% in 2018 to 54.2% in 2019. Both HPV vaccination coverage measures improved among females and males. An increase in adolescent coverage with ≥1 dose of MenACWY (from 86.6% in 2018 to 88.9% in 2019) also was observed. Among adolescents aged 17 years, 53.7% received the booster dose of MenACWY in 2019, not statistically different from 50.8% in 2018; 21.8% received ≥1 dose of MenB, a 4.6 percentage point increase from 17.2% in 2018. Among adolescents living at or above the poverty level,§ those living outside a metropolitan statistical area (MSA)¶ had lower coverage with ≥1 dose of MenACWY and with ≥1 HPV vaccine dose, and a lower percentage were HPV UTD, compared with those living in MSA principal cities. In early 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way health care providers operate and provide routine and essential services. An examination of Vaccines for Children (VFC) provider ordering data showed that vaccine orders for HPV vaccine; tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap); and MenACWY decreased in mid-March when COVID-19 was declared a national emergency (Supplementary Figure 1, https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/91795). Ensuring that routine immunization services for adolescents are maintained or reinitiated is essential to continuing progress in protecting persons and communities from vaccine-preventable diseases and outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Meningococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Female , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Male , United States , Vaccines, Conjugate/administration & dosage
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