Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 223
Filter
1.
Emerg Med Australas ; 34(6): 1017-1018, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2192188
2.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(11): e32757, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internationally, there is increasing emphasis on early support for pregnant women to optimize the health and development of mothers and newborns. To increase intervention reach, digital and app-based interventions have been advocated. There are growing numbers of pregnancy health care apps with great variation in style, function, and objectives, but evidence about impact on pregnancy well-being and behavior change following app interaction is lacking. This paper reports on the qualitative arm of the independent multicomponent study exploring the use and outcomes of first-time mothers using the Baby Buddy app, a pregnancy and parenting support app, available in the National Health Service App Library and developed by a UK child health and well-being charity, Best Beginnings. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand when, why, and how first-time mothers use the Baby Buddy app and the perceived benefits and challenges. METHODS: This paper reports on the qualitative arm of an independent, longitudinal, mixed methods study. An Appreciative Inquiry qualitative approach was used with semistructured interviews (17/60, 28%) conducted with new mothers, either by telephone or in a focus group setting. First-time mothers were recruited from 3 study sites from across the United Kingdom. Consistent with the Appreciative Inquiry approach, mothers were prompted to discuss what worked well and what could have been better regarding their interactions with the app during pregnancy. Thematic analysis was used, and findings are presented as themes with perceived benefits and challenges. RESULTS: The main benefit, or what worked well, for first-time mothers when using the app was being able to access new information, which they felt was reliable and easy to find. This led to a feeling of increased confidence in the information they accessed, thus supporting family and professional communication. The main challenge was the preference for face-to-face information with a health care professional, particularly around specific issues that they wished to discuss in depth. What could have been improved included that there were some topics that some mothers would have preferred in more detail, but in other areas, they felt well-informed and thus did not feel a need to seek additional information via an app. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study included a small sample, it elicited rich data and insights into first-time mothers' app interactions. The findings suggest that easily accessible pregnancy information, which is perceived as reliable, can support first-time mothers in communicating with health care professionals. Face-to-face contact with professionals was preferred, particularly to discuss specific and personalized needs. Further studies on maternal and professional digital support preferences after the COVID-19 global pandemic and how they facilitate antenatal education and informed decision-making are recommended, particularly because digital solutions remain as a key element in pregnancy and early parenting care. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1017/S1463423618000294.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Infant , Child , Female , Humans , Parenting , State Medicine , Mothers
3.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(9): e581-e589, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, caregivers who are facing high stress levels and decreased emotional well-being may parent their children differently. Certain children are experiencing greater fear in response to COVID-19, and research is needed to identify parenting behaviors significantly linked with children's COVID-19 fear. The purpose of this article was to evaluate whether the association between parenting stress and children's COVID-19 fear could be explained by parents' COVID-19 information management and emotional well-being. METHODS: Participants were recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. The sample consisted of 595 caregivers of children during the COVID-19 pandemic; 40.0% men, 69.2% non-Latinx White, 12.1% Black, 10.1% Latinx, 6.6% Asian, and <2% others. Children had an average age of 11.3 years. Parents completed self-report measures. RESULTS: The bootstrapped confidence interval (0.040, 0.148) for the indirect effect (0.090) revealed that parent emotional well-being significantly mediated the relation between parenting stress and children's COVID-19 fear. In addition, parent management of children's COVID-19 knowledge significantly mediated the relation between parenting stress and children's COVID-19 fear. CONCLUSION: We found that the combined effect of parents' emotional well-being and parents' management of children's COVID-19 knowledge significantly mediated the positive relation between parenting stress and children's COVID-19 fear. Based on our findings, once parents' parenting stress is decreased and their well-being increases, parents may be more likely to provide children with developmentally appropriate and accurate COVID-19 information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Child , Male , Humans , Female , Parenting/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Fear , Information Management , Parent-Child Relations
4.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 24(11): 591-601, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2129143

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Parental mental disorders, particularly borderline personality disorder (BPD), impair parenting behavior. Consequently, the children exhibit an elevated risk for psychopathology across their lifespan. Social support for parents is thought to moderate the relationship between parental mental illness and parenting behavior. It may dampen negative effects and serve as starting point for preventive interventions. This paper provides a literature overview regarding the impact of social support on the sequelae of parental mental illness and BPD for parenting behavior. RECENT FINDINGS: Current literature highlights the increased burden of families with a mentally ill parent and associated changes in parenting behavior like increased hostility and affective dysregulation, especially in the context of parental BPD. Literature further demonstrates the powerful impact of social support in buffering such negative outcomes. The effect of social support seems to be moderated itself by further factors like socioeconomic status, gender, or characteristics of the social network. Social support facilitates positive parenting in mentally ill parents and may be particularly important in parents with BPD. However, social support is embedded within a framework of influencing factors, which need consideration when interpreting scientific results.


Subject(s)
Borderline Personality Disorder , Child of Impaired Parents , Child , Humans , Parenting/psychology , Borderline Personality Disorder/psychology , Parents/psychology , Child of Impaired Parents/psychology , Social Support
5.
Transl Behav Med ; 12(11): 1065-1075, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097456

ABSTRACT

Driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, many in-person health behavior interventions were compelled to quickly pivot to a virtual format with little time or capacity to reflect on or examine possible equity-related implications of a format that required digital access and remote learning skills. Using a parenting program for low-income families as a case study, this paper (a) outlines the process of adapting the program from an in-person to a virtual format and (b) examines the equity-related implications of this adaptation. Parents Connect for Healthy Living (PConnect) is a 10-session empowerment-focused parenting intervention designed to promote family health for Head Start families. In 2020, PConnect was adapted over a 6-month period from an in-person to a virtual format due to the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. Three core elements were retained in the adaptation; session content, provision of coaching support for facilitators, and the co-facilitation model. Key modifications include session length, group composition, and language of program delivery. Head Start and PConnect records provided data to compare reach, acceptability, and appropriateness of virtual and in-person PConnect. Seventy-eight parents enrolled in the in-person program and 58 in the virtual program. Participant demographics and satisfaction were similar across formats, and demographics similar to the general Head Start population. Participation was higher in the virtual format. Parents participated in the virtual program primarily via smart phones (68%). This case study supports the acceptability and appropriateness of virtual parenting programs in ethnically diverse, low-resource settings.


The purpose of this study was to examine the process of adapting an in-person health and empowerment parenting program, Parents Connect for Healthy Living (PConnect), to a virtual format, and examine if this adaptation and implementation of the virtual format led to inequities. Modifications to in-person PConnect to accommodate a virtual format included session length, group composition, and language of program delivery. Participant demographics and satisfaction were similar across the in-person and virtual formats. Attendance was slightly higher in the virtual format, and differences in attendance rates by race/ethnicity in the virtual program were less apparent. Findings from this case study indicate future programs for parents in low-resource settings should consider a virtual or hybrid approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Parents , Poverty
6.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 302, 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079399

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic has put an unprecedented pressure on families with children. How parents were affected by the first Covid-19 lockdown during the early postpartum period, an already challenging period for many, is unknown. AIM: To investigate the associations between Covid-19 related stress, mental health, and insensitive parenting practices in mothers and fathers with young infants during the first Dutch Covid-19 lockdown. METHODS: The Dutch Covid-19 and Perinatal Experiences (COPE-NL) study included 681 parents of infants between 0 and 6 months (572 mothers and 109 fathers). Parents filled out online questionnaires about Covid-19 related stress, mental health (i.e. anxiety and depressive symptoms), and insensitive parenting. Hierarchical regression models were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Parents of a young infant reported high rates of Covid-19 related stress, with higher reported stress in mothers compared to fathers. Additionally, the percentages of mothers and fathers experiencing clinically meaningful mental health symptoms during the pandemic were relatively high (mothers: 39.7% anxiety, 14.5% depression; fathers: 37.6% anxiety, 6.4% depression). More Covid-19 related stress was associated with more mental health symptoms in parents and increased insensitive parenting practices in mothers. CONCLUSIONS: The results emphasize the strain of the pandemic on young fathers' and mothers' mental health and its potential negative consequences for parenting. As poor parental mental health and insensitive parenting practices carry risk for worse child outcomes across the lifespan, the mental health burden of the Covid-19 pandemic might not only have affected the parents, but also the next generation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Fathers/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Mental Health , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Pregnancy
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065955

ABSTRACT

Raising and caring for a child with ASD is a challenge for the parents' marriage relationship. Caring for a disabled child changes the functioning of the family and requires greater involvement in care and specialist therapy. The respondents' answers show that such parents experience higher levels of stress related to the upbringing and future of the child. However, parenting challenges need not be a negative experience if the parents support each other. The process of bringing up children in the family are related, inter alia, to the quality of their parents 'marriage, which is influenced by the partners' personal resources. The resilience of the partners and coping with this situation contribute to marital satisfaction. The aim of the study is to find out about the relationship between spouses' resilience and coping styles and their assessment of marriage satisfaction. In total, 50 married couples participated in the study-50 mothers of children with ASD and 50 fathers, the partners of these mothers (N = 100). The following tools were used: the Resilience Scale (SPP-25), the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and the Well-Matched Marriage Questionnaire (KDM-2), as well as a survey questionnaire (data on respondents). The results show that the gender of the parent of a child with ASD does not differentiate the overall assessment of the quality of marriage (the overall score on the scale indicates a low level of satisfaction with the relationship). When analyzing in detail the dimensions of individual scales of satisfaction with the relationship, one statistically significant difference was noted for the sex of the respondents in the disappointment dimension, showing that the level of disappointment in the quality of the relationship is higher in wives than in husbands. In the other dimensions of satisfaction with marriage: intimacy, personal fulfillment, similarity, there were no statistically significant differences in terms of gender of the respondents. The resilience of the spouses positively correlates with their assessment of marriage satisfaction, and in particular, openness, perseverance and determination to act increase the level of Task-oriented coping (SSZ) with difficult situations. All resilience factors negatively correlate with the emotional coping style (SSE). In both the studied groups, openness is a significant predictor of intimacy, and persistence is a predictor of self-fulfilment in a relationship. A predictor of disappointment in women is managing using substitute activities (ACZ), while in men it is the Emotion-oriented coping (SSE) style. The results indicate the need to support married couples raising a child with ASD during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Marriage/psychology , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Spouses/psychology
8.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 763, 2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064761

ABSTRACT

Poor mental health in the postnatal period is experienced by high numbers of parents, with a high associated cost to society, however accessing therapeutic support during this time is complicated by parenting commitments. This has been further compounded by the covid-19 pandemic, where access to traditional therapy has been impacted. A lack of access to support for poor mental health in this period can have long term impacts on both the parents and their child. E-Health provides a potential solution to parents accessing support during this period by providing a convenient and flexible intervention which overcomes the barriers of traditional face-to-face therapy. However, without investigating the acceptability of such support for parents, it is not possible to predict uptake and consequent effectiveness. The current review synthesizes data available on acceptability of e-Health interventions in the post-natal period, finding that parents valued e-Health interventions however considerations must be made to certain, key areas impacting the acceptability of these interventions for parents. An element of therapist support and individualised content was preferred, along with a smooth user experience. Parents valued that e-Health fit into their routines and provided anonymity in their interactions. Further research needs to be completed into acceptability for minority social and ethnic groups where access and preference may differ.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology
9.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(5): 678-683, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056167

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The pandemic has been difficult on physicians, with two fifths of doctors in one survey reporting that their mental health is now worse than before the pandemic. It is likely that a significant proportion of these physicians are parents of children necessitating childcare, as approximately 32% of the US workforce has someone in their household under the age of 14. We sought to study the impact of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on physician parents in academia. Our goal was to investigate the intersection of professional and personal challenges, as well as perceived impact on domestic life and professional development secondary to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Using Survey Monkey, we developed a 37-question survey to address the aim of this study. Questions were grouped into four categories: demographics; impact on childcare; impact on care; and impact on mental health/wellness. Most of the questions were multiple choice with a few fill-in-the-blank options to allow participants to provide additional information related to their experiences as physicians during the pandemic. A link to the survey was disseminated via email to physicians at our home institution, Rush University Medical Center (Chicago), via our own intra- and interdepartmental communications, We used private social media accounts such as Facebook physician groups to reach out to physicians at other academic medical centers. Survey responses were voluntary and collected anonymously over an eight-week period, without identifiable data. Inclusion criteria included any physician identifying themselves as working full or full or part time in an academic facility in the US and caregivers for children <18 years. RESULTS: Survey respondents were mostly female (83.2%), practicing in the Midwest (61.2%), and ranked as assistant professor (59.5%). The majority of respondents had two children (65.1%) who were <11 years in age (85.6%). Most respondents worked full time with 72.8% working over 50% clinically. Childcare was disrupted for 171 of 232 respondents (73.7%); 62.9% struggled with balancing work with childcare; 81.9% worried often or very often about fulfilling their responsibilities. A vast majority, 210 of 232 respondents (90.5%) had some degree of concern about feeling overburdened by their roles. More than half (57.3%) worried that their professional advancement was impacted by the pandemic, and 53.9% considered making adjustments to their clinical workload/. Over half (51.6%) thought that increased domestic responsibilities impacted their professional advancement. CONCLUSION: In the survey, which was completed primarily by early-career women physicians practicing in a variety of specialties and geographic regions, we noted that childcare disruption amidst the pandemic was extremely prevalent. The majority of respondents reported full-time equivalent work; thus, it is reasonable to assume that significant workloads and limitations in remote work in combination with childcare constraints resulted in significant burden. A large number felt the challenges were negatively impacting their professional development and felt overburdened by their various roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Women , Physicians , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 924434, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055088

ABSTRACT

Background: A 3-month parent education program was designed and implemented in Hong Kong to improve physical literacy (PL) among primary school children and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to probe into the acceptability of the intervention from parental perspectives, providing more insights for future implementation. Methods: Following the 3-month parent-focused PL program, 16 parents (mean age = 43.73 years, 15 mothers) were recruited to participate in semi-structured individual interviews in June 2021. Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis in NVivo 12. Two coders analyzed interview transcripts deductively based on the interview guide and social cognitive theory (SCT). Results: Three themes were identified that captured the acceptability of the program: (1) Addressing needs through appropriate delivery enhances acceptability of intervention; (2) Positive behavioral and psychological changes to families; (3) Appropriate support of environmental factors can enhance the sustainability of program effects. The high levels of acceptability were attributable to the fact that parents were able to learn and be a gatekeeper to impact their children positively. Moreover, the design and contents of the program were appropriate for the participating parents because the program provided adequate learning resources and interactive learning support without being overly rigid, and the online learning mode was feasible and convenient. Consequent to their participation in the program, parents expressed that they became more aware of the importance of PL, established physical activity routines with their children, and modified their parenting styles which resulted in improved parent-child relationships. Conclusions: The current study provided evidence that engaging parents in the intervention was feasible and acceptable approach in supporting both parents and children to establish physically active routines in the family setting. The insights gained regarding the appropriateness and acceptability of the program in this specific context may be used to inform the design, implementation and sustainability of other parent-focused PL programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Literacy , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology
11.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 16252, 2022 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050540

ABSTRACT

This study examined mediation of a negative COVID-impact on the relationship between risk exposure, and life satisfaction and internalizing symptoms in youth (aged 9-18). Four operationalizations of risk exposure were applied; an Additive versus a Cumulative Risk Model (ARM and CRM), risk clusters and the most salient risk factors. Results showed that a stronger negative COVID-impact is related to lower life satisfaction, more internalizing symptoms and higher additive and cumulative risk. ARM and CRM's effect on lower life satisfaction is mediated through negative COVID-impact, though not for internalizing symptoms. Clusters of risk factors and risk factors within clusters significantly related to a stronger negative COVID-impact are the clusters 'Individual factors' (low self-control), 'Parenting' (negative mother-child interaction and low parental responsiveness), 'Maternal mental health' and 'Demographic factors' (low SES and high paternal education). From all significant risk factors, low self-control, low parental responsiveness, negative mother-child interaction and low SES were most salient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mother-Child Relations , Parenting , Parents , Personal Satisfaction
12.
Matern Child Health J ; 26(11): 2308-2317, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041303

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a particularly adverse and stressful environment for expecting mothers, possibly enhancing feelings of anxiety and parenting stress. The present work assesses mothers' anxiety levels at delivery and parenting stress after 3 months as moderated by home-visiting sessions. METHODS: Women (n = 177) in their second or third trimester of pregnancy during the COVID-19 lockdown were enrolled in northern Italy and split into those who did and did not receive home visits. After 3 months, the association between anxiety at delivery and parenting stress was assessed with bivariate correlations in the whole sample and comparing the two groups. RESULTS: Higher anxiety at birth correlated with greater perceived stress after 3 months. Mothers who received at least one home-visiting session reported lower parenting stress at 3 months than counterparts who did not receive home visits. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: The perinatal period is a sensitive time window for mother-infant health, especially during a critical time like the COVID-19 pandemic. We suggest that home-visiting programs could be beneficial during global healthcare emergencies to promote maternal well-being after delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Abuse , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Child , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , House Calls , Parenting , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Mothers , Anxiety/epidemiology , Postpartum Period
13.
Matern Child Health J ; 26(10): 2060-2069, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035168

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Despite evidence for heightened psychiatric risk and unique parenting challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, no research exists on the specific needs of parents of infants and responsiveness of pediatric care to their needs. We aimed to describe the support needs of new parents and explore their experiences with pediatric care. METHODS: In late 2020 we conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 mothers of babies born or due that year. Interviews addressed perinatal experiences during the pandemic, with an emphasis on experiences related to social support. In an iterative, inductive process, thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: This study identifies a set of support needs specific to the context of parenting an infant during the COVID-19 crisis: coping with the compound psychological impacts of the postpartum period and a pandemic; parenting in the absence of expected social support; risk assessment to keep infant and family safe. This study finds that policies implemented by health care providers to reduce risk of COVID-19 transmission came at a cost to new parents and parent-provider relationships. Participants reported mixed experiences with in-person and telehealth pediatric care, including inadequate and/or uncomfortable postpartum mental health screening and breastfeeding support, and identified specific features that constituted responsive care during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Normative changes associated with the postpartum period combined with complex adaptations necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic presented substantial challenges for families with infants, even relatively privileged families. Providers can incorporate these findings to enhance support for families and promote maternal and child health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Parenting , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Pregnancy
14.
Hosp Pediatr ; 12(11): e379-e388, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many women physicians experienced increased caregiver responsibilities, potentially leading to worsened gender inequities. METHODS: We surveyed faculty and trainees at a quaternary-care children's hospital regarding work environment, household obligations, and academic productivity to examine differential effects on productivity by gender and parenting status. We used descriptive statistics for demographics and analyzed Likert-scale responses with χ2 or Fisher's exact tests. We performed multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with self-reported academic productivity. We analyzed free-response comments using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The August 2021 survey was completed by 366 respondents (65% women; 46% response rate). Women were significantly more likely to report decreased academic productivity than men (66% [146/222] vs 30% [38/129], P <.001). Nearly one-half (49%) were parents with 80% utilizing childcare. Of these, 61% experienced unreliable childcare during the pandemic. Parents with unreliable childcare reported significantly decreased academic productivity compared with those with reliable childcare (76% [64/84] vs 36% [19/53], P <.001), and, among those with unreliable childcare, women disproportionally reported decreased academic productivity compared with men (88.5% [54/61] vs 43.5% [10/23], P <.001). After multivariable adjustment, women physicians with children were significantly more likely to report decreased academic productivity than men with children (adjusted odds ratio: 10.19, 95% confidence interval: 4.68-22.23). CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has differentially impacted men and women physicians, with women physician parents more likely to report decreased academic productivity than men with children. Unreliable childcare was a significant contributor to this disparity. Institutions must prioritize initiatives to improve gender equity in medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Child , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Parenting , Sex Factors , Pediatricians
15.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(9): e573-e580, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029102

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test associations between (1) contextual factors and types of digital media use and (2) types of digital media use and children's social-emotional and sleep outcomes during COVID-19. METHODS: In February to March 2021, 303 parents of elementary schoolers participated in this cross-sectional survey gathering information on demographics, child school format, contextual factors, duration of types of digital media use, social-emotional outcomes, and sleep. Multivariable regressions examined associations outlined in the objective, adjusting for school format, only child, race/ethnicity, and parental stress, depressive symptoms, education, and material hardship. RESULTS: Children were aged 5 years to younger than 11 years and spent approximately 4 hours on screen media daily. In multivariable analyses, remote school format; greater material hardship; Black, Indigenous, and people of color child race/ethnicity; lower parenting stress; and parent depressive symptoms were associated with longer duration of various digital media. Longer daily duration of streaming video and video chat were associated with higher prosocial scores, while console games, mobile apps/games, and video-sharing platforms were associated with greater problematic media use (PMU) (defined as interfering with adaptive functioning). More time on mobile apps/games, video-sharing platforms, and video streaming was linked with shorter sleep. CONCLUSION: Lower parenting stress predicted greater digital media use. Greater digital media use during the pandemic may have enabled parents to focus on other needs. Use of media for social connection predicted greater prosocial behaviors. Engagement-prolonging digital media predicted PMU. Pediatric providers may wish to consider family context when addressing digital media use and encourage socially oriented digital media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Video Games , Child , Humans , Television , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Internet , Parenting/psychology , Parents
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023721

ABSTRACT

Recently, there has been an increase in feelings of loneliness and mental health conditions among adolescents. Within this population, parenting teens are at an increased risk for these conditions. Outdoor experiences are shown to be an antidote to loneliness and a way to promote social connectedness by amplifying the processes for supporting social relationships. In 2020-2021, we piloted the 8-week Meeting in Nature Together program (MINT) at a charter school for pregnant and parenting teenagers in Colorado, USA. MINT aimed to promote relatedness and nature connection for students ages 14 to 19. MINT included online and in-person group meetings with educational content, creative activities, discussion, park excursions, mindfulness activities, journaling, and nature photography. Here, we ask, can a school-level nature-based social intervention reduce loneliness among pregnant and parenting teens by promoting and sustaining social connections? How acceptable is MINT to participants? Methods included audiovisual recording transcriptions, surveys, and observation field notes. Results suggest that MINT fostered social connections through a tailored nature-based intervention delivered to a typically isolated community in culturally sensitive, developmentally appropriate ways. MINT proved feasible and effective as participants reported high levels of satisfaction and interest in continuing to engage in activities promoted in MINT.


Subject(s)
Loneliness , Mentha , Adolescent , Adult , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Parenting , Peer Group , Pregnancy , Young Adult
17.
Child Care Health Dev ; 48(6): 911-916, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2019167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in substantial disruptions to daily functioning and lifestyle behaviours, with negative health consequences for youth. Parents play a large role in their children's health behaviour; yet changes to parenting behaviours during the pandemic related to food and physical activity remain relatively unexplored. The present study is the first to our knowledge to examine specific changes in American parents' parenting behaviours related to food and physical activity during COVID-19, and potential correlates of such changes, including perceived stress and decision fatigue. METHODS: A total of 140 parents (88.57% female; 88.41% White; 87.59% married; with one to five children) from middle to upper income households completed an online survey assessing demographics, perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), decision fatigue (Decision Fatigue Scale) and food and activity parenting behaviour changes during COVID-19. RESULTS: Overall, a greater proportion of parents engaged primarily in positive (57.14%) than negative (22.86%) parenting practices related to food and physical activity during the pandemic. Moderation analyses showed that the negative relation between perceived stress and positive parental behaviour changes was stronger at higher perceived increases in decision fatigue during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In the face of a major public health crisis, adaptive parental responses may emerge, but perceived stress may inhibit such behaviour change. Perceived stress and decision fatigue may represent important explanatory factors in parental health promoting behaviours during times of uncertainty and change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Exercise , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parenting , Parents
18.
J Paediatr Child Health ; 58(11): 2051-2057, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997201

ABSTRACT

AIM: This paper aims to examine the maternal and child mental health and parenting outcomes in the context of COVID-19 pandemic conditions using a sample from Melbourne, Australia - a city exposed to one of the longest lockdowns world-wide in response to the pandemic. METHODS: This study utilises observational data from a prospective, pregnancy cohort, Mercy Pregnancy Emotional Wellbeing Study and includes 468 women and their children followed up in Melbourne to 3-4 years postpartum pre-COVID pandemic and compared to those followed up during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: When compared to mothers followed up at 3-4 years postpartum pre-pandemic, those followed up during the COVID-19 pandemic showed higher depressive symptoms with a steep incline in their symptom trajectory (EMMdifference  = 1.72, Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.01, d = 0.35) and had a three times higher risk of scoring 13 or above on the EPDS (aRR = 3.22, Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.01). Although this increase was not associated with the variation in the duration of exposure to pandemic conditions, the steep increase in depressive symptoms was more pronounced in those with pre-existing depressive disorders. There was no difference in parenting stress or adjusted childhood mental health symptoms or disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the vulnerability of those with pre-existing clinical mental health disorders and the need for adequate clinical care for this vulnerable group. Equally, our study indicates the possibility that  parenting and early childhood mental health outcomes, at least in the short term, may be resilient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Pregnancy , Child , Female , Child, Preschool , Humans , Parenting/psychology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Mothers/psychology
19.
Child Care Health Dev ; 48(6): 1103-1111, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 crisis influenced the lives of families and preschoolers, worldwide. School closures and restriction measures introduced distance learning for preschoolers and remote working for parents. Social distancing narrowed opportunities to meet with peers and enjoy leisure activities. Additionally, social and mental services closures limited young children's accessibility to mental, speech and occupational health services. The aim of the current study was to investigate how home confinement during the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic affected parenting self-efficacy and preschoolers' anxiety. METHOD: An online survey based on a convenience sample took place on April 2021 to evaluate how home confinement to halt the third wave of COVID-19 pandemic influenced children's anxiety and parenting self-efficacy (PSE). Parents of 146 children (65 girls [44.5%] and 81 boys [55.5%]; aged 2-6 years old) were enrolled and completed a demographics form, the Preschool Anxiety Scale (PAS) and the Tool to Measure Parenting Self-efficacy (TOPSE). RESULTS: Most of the participants reported that the relationship with their child was positively affected from staying at home. TOPSE mean scores reflected average parenting self-efficacy. PSE was negatively correlated with children's anxiety. COVID-19-related variables 'Parent's vaccine hesitancy' and 'Death of a loved one' had a clear effect on preschoolers' anxiety, whereas the latter also on PSE. CONCLUSION: Findings highlight the necessity of implementing public health strategies to strengthen families and support parents and their children during the ongoing health crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parents , Self Efficacy
20.
Child Care Health Dev ; 48(6): 1094-1102, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of screen time for young children has been hotly debated among experts. This study explored the utilization of screen time among mothers with young children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this study was to understand maternal motivation for utilizing screen time and how mothers have engaged in screen time since the beginning of the pandemic. METHOD: This paper uses a sample of n = 25 mothers who participated in an in-depth interview about parenting during the COVID-19 pandemic. The team utilized a thematic analysis approach to qualitatively code the transcripts. All analyses were conducted in Dedoose 8.3, and all transcripts were coded by three independent researchers to enhance rigour. RESULTS: Five main themes emerged from the interviews: (1) harbouring screen guilt versus letting it go, (2) managing full-time work and full-time parenting, (3) prioritizing mental sanity, (4) socially distant supports demand screen time and (5) screens can have positive uses, too. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mothers have resorted to screen time use to cope with increased stress and challenges. However, mothers have also found positive uses for screen time, such as connection with extended family members, peer interaction and educational activities. Findings highlight the need to differentiate screen time use by quality and to update formal screen time guidelines considering changing roles of technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Screen Time , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pandemics , Parenting , Parents
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL