Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 464
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Am J Bioeth ; 22(1): 66-68, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596213
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e31665, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596158

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Parental health literacy is associated with child health outcomes. Parents are increasingly turning to the internet to obtain health information. In response, health care providers are using digital interventions to communicate information to assist parents in managing their child's health conditions. Despite the emergence of interventions to improve parental health literacy, to date, no systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of the interventions has been undertaken. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to examine the effect of digital health interventions on health literacy among parents of children aged 0-12 years with a health condition. This includes evaluating parents' engagement (use and satisfaction) with digital health interventions, the effect of these interventions on parental health knowledge and health behavior, and the subsequent impact on child health outcomes. METHODS: This systematic review was registered a priori on PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews) and developed according to the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for systematic reviews. The databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant literature published between January 2010 and April 2021. Studies were included if they were written in English. A total of 2 authors independently assessed the search results and performed a critical appraisal of the studies. RESULTS: Following the review of 1351 abstracts, 31 (2.29%) studies were selected for full-text review. Of the 31 studies, 6 (19%) studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the 6 studies, 1 (17%) was excluded following the critical appraisal, and the 5 (83%) remaining studies were quantitative in design and included digital health interventions using web-based portals to improve parents' health knowledge and health behavior. Owing to heterogeneity in the reported outcomes, meta-analysis was not possible, and the findings were presented in narrative form. Of the 5 studies, satisfaction was measured in 3 (60%) studies, and all the studies reported high satisfaction with the digital intervention. All the studies reported improvement in parental health literacy at postintervention as either increase in disease-specific knowledge or changes in health behavior. Of the 5 studies, only 1 (20%) study included child health outcomes, and this study reported significant improvements related to increased parental health knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: In response to a pandemic such as COVID-19, there is an increased need for evidence-based digital health interventions for families of children living with health conditions. This review has shown the potential of digital health interventions to improve health knowledge and behavior among parents of young children with a health condition. However, few digital health interventions have been developed and evaluated for this population. Future studies with robust research designs are needed and should include the potential benefits of increased parent health literacy for the child. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews CRD42020192386; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=192386.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Parents , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Trials ; 23(1): 5, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding offers many medical and neurodevelopmental advantages for birthing parents and infants; however, the majority of parents stop breastfeeding before it is recommended. Professional lactation support by the International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) increases breastfeeding rates; however, many communities lack access to IBCLCs. Black and Latinx parents have lower breastfeeding rates, and limited access to professional lactation support may contribute to this disparity. Virtual "telelactation" consults that use two-way video have the potential to increase access to IBCLCs among disadvantaged populations. We present a protocol for the digital Tele-MILC trial, which uses mixed methods to evaluate the impact of telelactation services on breastfeeding outcomes. The objective of this pragmatic, parallel design randomized controlled trial is to assess the impact of telelactation on breastfeeding duration and exclusivity and explore how acceptability of and experiences with telelactation vary across Latinx, Black, and non-Black and non-Latinx parents to guide future improvement of these services. METHODS: 2400 primiparous, pregnant individuals age > 18 who intend to breastfeed and live in the USA underserved by IBCLCs will be recruited. Recruitment will occur via Ovia, a pregnancy tracker mobile phone application (app) used by over one million pregnant individuals in the USA annually. Participants will be randomized to (1) on-demand telelactation video calls on personal devices or (2) ebook on infant care/usual care. Breastfeeding outcomes will be captured via surveys and interviews and compared across racial and ethnic groups. This study will track participants for 8 months (including 6 months postpartum). Primary outcomes include breastfeeding duration and breastfeeding exclusivity. We will quantify differences in these outcomes across racial and ethnic groups. Both intention-to-treat and as-treated (using instrumental variable methods) analyses will be performed. This study will also generate qualitative data on the experiences of different subgroups of parents with the telelactation intervention, including barriers to use, satisfaction, and strengths and limitations of this delivery model. DISCUSSION: This is the first randomized study evaluating the impact of telelactation on breastfeeding outcomes. It will inform the design and implementation of future digital trials among pregnant and postpartum people, including Black and Latinx populations which are historically underrepresented in clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04856163. Registered on April 23, 2021.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Parents , Postnatal Care , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
Sci Diabetes Self Manag Care ; 47(6): 447-456, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582453

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to survey parents of youth with type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic with school closures to better understand the implications of the school day on health care behaviors. METHODS: A cross-sectional, online survey was distributed to parents of youth with type 1 diabetes ≤19 years of age in a large, academic diabetes center. Questions encompassed perceived changes in management behaviors and plans for return to school. Subgroup analysis compared parent responses by child's age, reported stressors, and socioeconomic markers. RESULTS: Parents reported a worsening in their child's diabetes health behaviors during school closures compared to what they perceived during a regular school day before the pandemic. More than half of parents reported feeling that their child was unable to maintain a normal routine, with particular implications for snacking between meals, daily physical activity, and sleep habits. Families with adolescents or those experiencing multiple pandemic-related stressors reported greater challenges. In open-ended responses, families highlighted difficulty in balancing school, work, and diabetes care and expressed concerns about the mental health repercussions of school closures for their children. Nearly half of parents reported being at least moderately worried about return to school, whereas only a minority reported seeking guidance from their diabetes provider. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-reported disruptions of school-day routines frequently had adverse consequences for diabetes management in this population. These findings highlight the importance of a school-day routine for children with type 1 diabetes; during closures, families may benefit from mitigating strategies to maintain effective habits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
6.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 840, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk to the global population. Maternity care in the UK was subject to many iterations of guidance on how best to reconfigure services to keep women, their families and babies, and healthcare professionals safe. Parents who experience a pregnancy loss or perinatal death require particular care and support. PUDDLES is an international collaboration investigating the experiences of recently bereaved parents who suffered a late miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death during the global COVID-19 pandemic, in seven countries. In this study, we aim to present early findings from qualitative work undertaken with recently bereaved parents in the United Kingdom about how access to healthcare and support services was negotiated during the pandemic. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents (N = 24) who had suffered a late miscarriage (n = 5; all mothers), stillbirth (n = 16; 13 mothers, 1 father, 1 joint interview involving both parents), or neonatal death (n = 3; all mothers). Data were analysed using a template analysis with the aim of investigating bereaved parents' access to services, care, and networks of support, during the pandemic after their bereavement. RESULTS: All parents had experience of utilising reconfigured maternity and/or neonatal, and bereavement care services during the pandemic. The themes utilised in the template analysis were: 1) The Shock & Confusion Associated with Necessary Restrictions to Daily Life; 2) Fragmented Care and Far Away Families; 3) Keeping Safe by Staying Away; and 4) Impersonal Care and Support Through a Screen. Results suggest access to maternity, neonatal, and bereavement care services were all significantly reduced, and parents' experiences were notably affected by service reconfigurations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, whilst preliminary, are important to document now, to help inform care and service provision as the pandemic continues and to provide learning for ongoing and future health system shocks. We draw conclusions on how to enable development of safe and appropriate services during this pandemic and any future health crises, to best support parents who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth/psychology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Preliminary Data , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 194, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Parents have faced unique challenges during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, including mobility constraints, isolation measures, working from home, and the closure of schools and childcare facilities. There is presently a lack of in-depth qualitative research exploring how these changes have affected parents' mental health and wellbeing. METHODS: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 29 parents of young children. Interviews were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: We identified five superordinate themes affecting participant mental health and wellbeing: (1) navigation of multiple responsibilities and change inside the home; (2) disruption to home life; (3) changes to usual support networks; (4) changes in personal relationships; and (5) use of coping strategies. Participants described stress and exhaustion from navigating multiple pressures and conflicting responsibilities with home, schooling, and work, without their usual support networks and in the context of disrupted routines. Family roles and relationships were sometimes tested, however, many parents identified coping strategies that protected their wellbeing including access to outdoor space, spending time away from family, and avoiding conflict and pandemic-related media coverage. CONCLUSIONS: Employers must be cognisant of the challenges that the pandemic has placed on parents, particularly women and lone parents. Flexible working arrangements and support might therefore relieve stress and increase productivity. Coping strategies identified by parents in this study could be harnessed and encouraged by employers and policymakers to promote positive wellbeing during times of stress throughout the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parents , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
9.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 2271, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571756

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health measures have resulted in the closure of many physical activity-supporting facilities. This study examined Ontario parents' and children's perspectives of COVID-19's impact on children's physical activity behaviours, return to play/sport during COVID-19, as well as barriers/facilitators to getting active amid extended closures of physical activity venues. METHODS: Parents/guardians of children aged 12 years and under living in Ontario, Canada were invited to participate in an interview. 12 parent/guardian and 9 child interviews were conducted via Zoom between December 2020 - January 2021, were audio-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Thematic content analysis was undertaken to identify pronounced themes. RESULTS: Themes for both parent and child interviews fell into one of three categories: 1) barriers and facilitators for getting children active amid COVID-19 closures of physical activity-supporting facilities; 2) changes in children's activity levels; and, 3) perspectives on return to play/sport during and post-pandemic. Various subthemes were identified and varied between parents and children. The most common facilitator for dealing with children's inactivity voiced by parents/guardians was getting active outdoors. Parents/guardians noted their willingness to have their children return to play/sport in the community once deemed safe by public health guidelines, and children's willingness to return stemmed primarily from missing their friends and other important authority figures (e.g., coaches) and sporting events (e.g., tournaments). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study could inform families of feasible and realistic strategies for increasing children's physical activity during community closures, while also providing public health experts with information regarding what supports, or infrastructure might be needed during future lockdown periods and/or pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(4): 1686-1699, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545670

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aimed to investigate the interrater reliability of pediatric feeding assessments conducted via synchronous (real-time) telepractice. Secondary aims were to investigate parent and clinician satisfaction. Method The eating and/or cup drinking skills of 40 children (aged 4 months to 7 years) were simultaneously assessed by one speech-language pathologist (SLP) leading the appointment via telepractice and a second SLP present in the family home. A purpose-designed assessment form was used to assess (a) positioning, (b) development, (c) oral sensorimotor function, (d) prefeeding respiratory status, (e) observation of eating and drinking, (f) parent-child interaction, (g) overall feeding skills, and (h) feeding recommendations. The telepractice SLP completed a postappointment satisfaction questionnaire, and parents completed five questionnaires specifically investigating perceptions of and satisfaction with the telepractice feeding appointment. Results Agreement for all assessment components except intraoral examination (palate integrity and tonsils) was > 85%. All appointments were able to be conducted via telepractice, and for 90% of these (n = 36), clinicians agreed that telepractice was an effective service delivery method. Parents reported high levels of satisfaction with telepractice, with 76% reporting that the telepractice appointment was similar to a traditional in-person appointment. Conclusion Study results demonstrated that synchronous pediatric feeding assessments conducted in family homes via telepractice were feasible, reliable, and acceptable to both clinicians and parents. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14700228.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Parents , Reproducibility of Results
11.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 134, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547728

ABSTRACT

Introduction: no one can deny that vaccination against several serious diseases in the world, and particularly in Morocco, has given very satisfactory protective results. The extension of the COVID-19 pandemic in our country has led to a significant decline in childhood immunization, which could have severe repercussions increasing the risk of future outbreaks. Hence, the measures of the Ministry of Health to correct the situation. The purpose of this study was to highlight the extent of vaccine release during COVID-19 pandemic and to make recommendations to restore vaccination programmes. Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional study of the effect of containment measures during this pandemic on the monitoring of children´s vaccinations. We conducted a national survey of pediatricians using an electronic questionnaire administered via Google Forms. We collected, analyzed and interpreted the results. Results: one hundred and three Moroccan pediatricians answered the questionnaire. More than 2-thirds (78.6%) of pediatricians practiced in the private sector and delivered vaccines in the immunization schedule. The majority of pediatricians (95%) were asked about parental vaccine concerns. We noted that 82.5% of parents were reluctant to go to the local health department and 5.8% refused to take vaccination during COVID-19 pandemic. About 22% of pediatricians completely stopped immunization services and 72.8% delayed immunizations from 3 to 4 weeks. Vaccination stoppage involved older children in two thirds of cases. Conclusion: it is essential to maintain public confidence in vaccination. Ongoing and timely assessment of vaccine coverage as well as clear recommendations and broad public awareness are essential to respond to vaccine changes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunization Schedule , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccines/administration & dosage , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunization Programs , Male , Middle Aged , Morocco , Parents , Pediatricians/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Coverage
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 779720, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528877

ABSTRACT

Introduction: With the approval of COVID-19 vaccinations for children and adolescents in China, parental vaccine hesitancy will emerge as a new challenge with regard to the administration of these vaccines. However, little is known regarding this hesitancy as well as regional differences that may exist between parents from Shandong vs. Zhejiang. Methods: To assess these issues, an online survey was conducted via a Wenjuanxing platform over the period from July 22 to August 14, 2021. Parents from Shandong and Zhejiang were recruited from Wechat groups and results from a total of 917 subjects were analyzed. Factors evaluated in this survey included socio-demographic variables, parental vaccine hesitancy, Parental Attitudes toward Childhood Vaccines (PACV) domains (behavior, safety and efficacy, general attitudes) and social support. Results: Compared with those from Shandong (N = 443), parents from Zhejiang (N = 474) showed significantly higher prevalence rates of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy (19.4 vs. 11.7%, p = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that yearly household incomes of ≥120,000 RMB (p = 0.041), medical workers (p = 0.022) and general attitudes of PACV (p = 0.004) were risk factors for vaccine hesitancy among parents from Shandong, while behavior (p = 0.004), safety and efficacy (p < 0.001) and general attitudes of PACV (p = 0.002) were risk factors for parents from Zhejiang. Among parents with vaccine hesitancy (N = 144), concerns over side effects (91.0%) and unknown effects (84.0%) of the COVID-19 vaccine were the most prevalent reasons for hesitancy. Evidence providing proof of vaccine safety (67.4%) and assurance of a low risk of being infected by COVID-19 (60.4%) were the two most effective persuasive factors. Conclusion: Parents from Zhejiang showed a higher prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy as compared with those from Shandong. Behavior, safety and efficacy, and general attitudes of PACV were the risk factors associated with this hesitancy in these parents from Zhejiang. Given the identification of the various reasons for parental vaccine hesitancy, different strategies as well as regional adjustments in these strategies will be required for an effective and convincing protocol for childhood vaccinations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adolescent , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Parents , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines/adverse effects
13.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1648-1666, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527992

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented families around the world with extraordinary challenges related to physical and mental health, economic security, social support, and education. The current study capitalizes on a longitudinal, cross-national study of parenting, adolescent development, and young adult competence to document the association between personal disruption during the pandemic and reported changes in internalizing and externalizing behavior in young adults and their mothers since the pandemic began. It further investigates whether family functioning during adolescence 3 years earlier moderates this association. Data from 484 families in five countries (Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) reveal that higher levels of reported disruption during the pandemic are related to reported increases in internalizing and externalizing behaviors after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic for young adults (Mage = 20) and their mothers in all five countries, with the exception of one association in Thailand. Associations between disruption during the pandemic and young adults' and their mothers' reported increases in internalizing and externalizing behaviors were attenuated by higher levels of youth disclosure, more supportive parenting, and lower levels of destructive adolescent-parent conflict prior to the pandemic. This work has implications for fostering parent-child relationships characterized by warmth, acceptance, trust, open communication, and constructive conflict resolution at all times given their protective effects for family resilience during times of crisis. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Family Health , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pandemics , Parenting , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Young Adult
14.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1719-1734, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527991

ABSTRACT

To slow down the spread of the COVID-19 virus, schools around the world were closed in early 2020, transferring children's scholastic activities to the homes and imposing a massive burden on parents and school-age children. Using data of a 21-day diary study conducted between March and April 2020 in Germany, this work examined whether (a) distance learning and (b) parents' involvement therein were associated with negative parent-child interactions and affective well-being of parents and children, over and above the effect of daily stressors. Participants were 562 parents (489 mothers, Mage = 42.79, SDage = 6.12, range = 25-63) most of whom were married (n = 382, 68.0%). They responded to the daily items with respect to the youngest child living in their household (Mage = 9.74, SDage = 2.81, range = 6-19). On days when children were working on school tasks, parents reported more negative parent-child interactions as well as lower parental and child positive affect and higher child negative affect, but not higher parental negative affect. Moreover, days when parents were more heavily involved in learning (i.e., when children worked less independently) were days with more negative parent-child interactions, lower parental and child positive affect, and higher parental and child negative affect. Negative parent-child interactions were linked to lower affective well-being of parents and children, and partially accounted for the relation among daily stressors and affective well-being. The present work highlights the need for measures to better support school-age children and their parents during distance learning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1611-1622, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527987

ABSTRACT

The extensive measures to prevent spread of COVID-19 have had a major impact on families' daily lives. Changes in family routines and experiences of COVID-19-related stress might negatively impact the quality of parenting and the parent-adolescent relationship. However, using active coping strategies might be associated with limited negative or even positive changes in the parent-adolescent relationship. This longitudinal, multi-informant, and pre-registered study used data of 240 mostly Dutch parents (85% mothers; Mage = 44.2 years old) and adolescents (50% girls; Mage = 11.4 years) from diverse SES backgrounds. Using Latent Change Score models, we examined how parent-reported parenting (i.e., positive parenting and discipline practices) and adolescent-reported relationship quality (i.e., support and negative interaction) changed from pre-COVID-19 (Fall 2019) to the COVID-19 period (Spring 2020). Moreover, we investigated whether parents' and adolescents' level of COVID-19-related stress was associated with the change in relationships, and whether active coping moderated the association between stress and changes in relationships. Results showed average decreases in support, positive parenting, and negative interactions between parents and adolescents. COVID-19-related stress was not a direct predictor of relationship changes and there was little evidence of moderating effects. Only adolescents' use of active coping strategies moderated the effect of stress on positive parenting. For high active coping adolescents, the link between stress and change in positive parenting was negative, whereas for low active coping adolescents this link was positive. The findings suggest that parent-adolescent relationships during a pandemic need attention, especially for adolescents with high stress levels and using active coping strategies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1633-1647, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527986

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a critical period for social development, which COVID-19 has dramatically altered. Quarantined youths had limited in-person interactions with peers. The present study used an intensive longitudinal design to investigate changes in interpersonal dynamics and mental health during COVID-19. Specifically, we investigated whether the associations between different social contexts-that is, "spillover"-changed during COVID-19 and whether changes in social interactions during COVID-19 was associated with changes in depressive symptoms. Approximately 1 year prior to the onset of COVID-19, 139 youths reported depressive symptoms and daily interactions with parents, siblings, and friends, every day for 21 days via online questionnaires. Shortly after schools closed due to COVID-19, 115 of these youths completed a similar 28-day diary. Analyses included 112 youths (62 girls; 73% Caucasian; Mage = 11.77, range = 8 to 15 in Wave 1) who completed at least 13 diary days in each data wave. Our results show that younger adolescents experienced significant decreases in negative and positive interactions with friends, whereas older adolescents showed significant decreases in negative interactions with friends and significant increases in positive interactions with siblings. As predicted, within-day spillover of positive interactions and person-level association of negative interactions increased within the family during COVID-19, whereas within-day spillover of positive interactions between family and friends decreased. We also found a dramatic increase in depressive symptoms. More negative interactions and fewer positive interactions with family members were associated with changes in depressive symptoms. Our study sheds light on how youths' social development may be impacted by COVID-19. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Adolescent , Female , Friends , Humans , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1582-1596, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527985

ABSTRACT

This Dutch multi-informant study examined effects of the first COVID-19 lockdown (LD; e.g., school closure and social restrictions) on parent-adolescent relationships. Four biweekly measurements before and 4 biweekly measurements during the LD were collected among adolescents (N = 179, Mage = 14.26 years, 69% girls) and their parents (N = 144, Mage = 47.01 years, 81% female). Parents' educational level was relatively diverse: 12% low (high school or lower), 33% medium (vocational training), and 55% high (college or university). Adolescents and parents reported on parental support, parent-adolescent conflict, autonomy support, psychological control, behavioral control, and time spent on various activities. Adolescents spent more time with their parents during LD (before M = 8.6 hr, during M = 12.7 hr), but less time with friends (before M = 8.1 hr, during M = 2.1 hr), and reported on average 13 COVID-19-related rules. Preregistered piecewise growth models confirmed that autonomy support decreased immediately during the LD, but no mean level changes were observed in the other relationship dimensions. During the first 2 months of the LD, parents reported gradual increases in autonomy support and decreases in behavioral control. Moreover, significant differences between families were found in sudden and more gradual relationship changes, which correlated strongly with pre-LD characteristics of the relationship, and in some models with adolescent oppositional defiance and legitimacy beliefs. In sum, findings suggest resilience in most families, but also heterogeneity: Some families were negatively affected, and others were positively affected. A tailored approach is therefore needed to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on family functioning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Adolescent , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1623-1632, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527984

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is placing demands on parents that may amplify the risk of parents' distress and poor parenting. Leveraging a prepandemic study in New Zealand, the current research tested whether parents' psychological distress during a mandated lockdown predicts relative residual changes in poorer parenting and whether partner support and cooperative coparenting buffer this potentially detrimental effect. Participants included 362 parents; 310 were from the same family (155 dyads). Parents had completed assessments of psychological distress and parenting prior to the pandemic and then reported on their distress, parenting, partner support, and cooperative coparenting during a nationwide COVID-19 lockdown. Parents' distress during the lockdown predicted relative residual increases in harsh parenting, but this effect was buffered by partner support. Parents' distress also predicted residual decreases in warm/responsive parenting and parent-child relationship quality, but these effects were buffered by cooperative coparenting. Partner support and cooperative coparenting are important targets for future research and interventions to help parents navigate challenging family contexts, including COVID-19 lockdowns. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
19.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1693-1707, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527983

ABSTRACT

In addition to the fears associated with contracting COVID-19, the pandemic has forced families across the United States to quickly transition to new patterns of living. These transitions present new stressors, including health-related concerns, new demands placed on families by lockdowns and stay-at-home orders, and the possibility of losing a job or inability to pay bills. Such stressors have the potential to disrupt collaboration between coparents in addition to basic family functioning. Drawing upon a family systems perspective, the current study thus sought to examine links between COVID-19-related stressors and family cohesion through coparental functioning. A total of 1,003 parent/caregivers (97% from the United States; 82% Caucasian, 74% female; M = 40.9 years old, SD = 8.5; Mincome = $83,631, SDincome = $36,320) of school-age children completed an initial online survey from the end of March to the end of April of 2020. Of the initial sample, a total of 685 parents/caregivers completed weekly diaries for a month. Based on multilevel modeling, results suggested that, at the between-family level, coparental conflict mediated the impact of the stress of parenting/work demands and financial stress on family cohesion. At the within-family level, weekly spikes in health-related stress were associated with corresponding spikes in coparental conflict, which, in turn, were associated with drops in family cohesion. Results from the current study suggest that beyond the fears associated with contracting the COVID-19 virus, other key stressors associated with the emerging pandemic played a role in increasing coparental conflict, ultimately exacerbating family functioning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Caregivers , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
20.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1667-1680, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527982

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was an unprecedented global public health emergency with a significant psychological toll. This study aimed to understand how specific COVID-19 related stressors contributed to Chinese parents' fear induction practices, and how these practices, in turn, contributed to their children's disease prevention practices during the outbreak and depressive symptoms after the outbreak. Parents (N = 240, Mage = 38.50 years, 75% mothers) with elementary-school-age children (Mage = 9.48 years, 46% girls) in Wenzhou, 1 of the most impacted cities in China, reported on the presence of confirmed or suspected cases in their communities, their frequencies of consuming COVID-19-related information, fear induction practices, and their children's trait anxiety and disease prevention practices during the outbreak (January 28-30, 2020). Child-reported depressive symptoms were collected between March 7-11, 2020; during which there were very few remaining cases and no new confirmed cases or deaths. Parents' higher frequency of virus-related information consumption but not the presence of community infection was associated with their engagement in more fear induction practices, which was in turn associated with children's greater engagement in prevention practices during the outbreak, but more postquarantine depressive symptoms. Child trait anxiety exacerbated the association between parent fear induction and child depressive symptoms. Using fear induction parenting may promote children's willingness to cooperate and participate in disease prevention practices during the crisis but at the cost of children's long-term mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , Child , Child Health , Disease Outbreaks , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Parent-Child Relations , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...