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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 840, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk to the global population. Maternity care in the UK was subject to many iterations of guidance on how best to reconfigure services to keep women, their families and babies, and healthcare professionals safe. Parents who experience a pregnancy loss or perinatal death require particular care and support. PUDDLES is an international collaboration investigating the experiences of recently bereaved parents who suffered a late miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death during the global COVID-19 pandemic, in seven countries. In this study, we aim to present early findings from qualitative work undertaken with recently bereaved parents in the United Kingdom about how access to healthcare and support services was negotiated during the pandemic. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents (N = 24) who had suffered a late miscarriage (n = 5; all mothers), stillbirth (n = 16; 13 mothers, 1 father, 1 joint interview involving both parents), or neonatal death (n = 3; all mothers). Data were analysed using a template analysis with the aim of investigating bereaved parents' access to services, care, and networks of support, during the pandemic after their bereavement. RESULTS: All parents had experience of utilising reconfigured maternity and/or neonatal, and bereavement care services during the pandemic. The themes utilised in the template analysis were: 1) The Shock & Confusion Associated with Necessary Restrictions to Daily Life; 2) Fragmented Care and Far Away Families; 3) Keeping Safe by Staying Away; and 4) Impersonal Care and Support Through a Screen. Results suggest access to maternity, neonatal, and bereavement care services were all significantly reduced, and parents' experiences were notably affected by service reconfigurations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, whilst preliminary, are important to document now, to help inform care and service provision as the pandemic continues and to provide learning for ongoing and future health system shocks. We draw conclusions on how to enable development of safe and appropriate services during this pandemic and any future health crises, to best support parents who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth/psychology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Preliminary Data , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258358, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, strict infection control measures including visitation regulations were implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). These regulations gave restricted access for parents to their hospitalized infants. The consequence was limited ability to involve in the care of their infants. At Oslo University Hospital entry to NICU was denied to all except healthy mothers in March 2020. The absolute access ban for fathers lasted for 10 weeks. The aim of this study was to explore parental experiences with an infant hospitalized in the NICU during this absolute visitation ban period. METHODS: We invited post discharge all parents of surviving infants that had been hospitalized for at least 14 days to participate. They were interviewed during autumn 2020 using an explorative semi-structured interview approach. Data were analyzed via inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Nine mothers and four fathers participated. The COVID-19 regulations strongly impacted the parent's experiences of their stay. The fathers' limited access felt life-impacting. Parents struggled to become a family and raised their voices to be heard. Not being able to experience parenthood together led to emotional loneliness. The fathers struggled to learn how to care for their infant. The regulations might lead to a postponed attachment. On the other hand, of positive aspect the parents got some quietness. Being hospitalized during this first wave was experienced as exceptional and made parents seeking alliances by other parents. Social media was used to keep in contact with the outside world. CONCLUSIONS: The regulations had strong negative impact on parental experiences during the NICU hospitalization. The restriction to fathers' access to the NICU acted as a significant obstacle to early infant-father bonding and led to loneliness and isolation by the mothers. Thus, these COVID-19 measures might have had adverse consequences for families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Semin Perinatol ; 45(5): 151431, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454526

ABSTRACT

We discuss the use of tele-mental health in settings serving expectant parents in fetal care centers and parents with children receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care units within a pediatric institution. Our emphasis is on the dramatic rise of tele-mental health service delivery for this population in the wake of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., including relevant practice regulations, challenges and advantages associated with the transition to tele-mental health in these perinatal settings.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/trends , Mental Health/trends , Perinatal Care , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Female , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Parents/education , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Care/methods , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Pregnancy , Prenatal Education/trends , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
6.
Pediatrics ; 146(1)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456130

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: More than 4 decades of research indicate that parenting interventions are effective at preventing and treating mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents. Pediatric primary care is a viable setting for delivery of these interventions. OBJECTIVE: Previous meta-analyses have shown that behavioral interventions in primary care can improve clinical outcomes, but few reviews have been focused specifically on the implementation of parenting interventions in primary care. We aimed to fill this gap. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed 6532 unique peer-reviewed articles published in PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycInfo. STUDY SELECTION: Articles were included if at least part of the intervention was delivered in or through primary care; parenting was targeted; and child-specific mental, emotional, and behavioral health outcomes were reported. DATA EXTRACTION: Articles were reviewed in Covidence by 2 trained coders, with a third coder arbitrating discrepancies. RESULTS: In our review of 40 studies, most studies were coded as a primary. Few researchers collected implementation outcomes, particularly those at the service delivery system level. LIMITATIONS: Including only published articles could have resulted in underrepresentation of implementation-related data. CONCLUSIONS: Parenting interventions delivered and implemented with fidelity in pediatric primary care could result in positive and equitable impacts on mental, emotional, and behavioral health outcomes for both parents and their children. Future research on the implementation strategies that can support adoption and sustained delivery of parenting interventions in primary care is needed if the field is to achieve population-level impact.


Subject(s)
Neurodevelopmental Disorders/therapy , Parenting , Parents/psychology , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Child , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology
8.
J Pediatr ; 237: 292-297, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446894

ABSTRACT

In a national survey of 2074 US parents of children ≤12 years of age conducted in March 2021, 49.4% reported plans to vaccinate their child for coronavirus disease 2019 when available. Lower income and less education were associated with greater parental vaccine hesitancy/resistance; safety and lack of need were primary reasons for vaccine hesitancy/resistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/trends , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 42(7): 532-539, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406509

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how sociodemographic characteristics and various aspects of parent well-being, family functioning, parent-child relationship, and child characteristics are related to psychological functioning in children aged 9 to 12 years during the COVID-19 lockdown. METHOD: Participants included 144 children aged 9 to 12 years and their parents who lived in the province of Quebec, Canada, during the COVID-19 mandatory lockdown. Parents and children were administered a phone-based survey in which various child, parent, parent-child, and family characteristics were assessed. RESULTS: Results showed that higher internalizing problems in children were related to greater depressive symptoms in parents, lower attachment security to parents, and greater aversion to aloneness in children. Results on externalizing behavior problems showed that more problems were associated with more family dysfunction and chaos and lower attachment security to parents. Finally, results on children's anxiety toward COVID-19 showed that more anxiety was associated with greater parental anxiety toward COVID-19 and more child aversion to aloneness. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that even during an unusual and stressful context such as a pandemic, proximal variables such as the attachment relationship that have been known to be closely associated with adaptation are significantly related to child psychological functioning. Such observations are important because they highlight factors that may accentuate child vulnerability in times of a pandemic and shed light on potential intervention targets.


Subject(s)
Behavioral Symptoms/psychology , COVID-19 , Child Behavior/psychology , Parent-Child Relations , Parents/psychology , Psychosocial Functioning , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Object Attachment , Quebec
10.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(8): 1054-1058, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by a newly discovered coronavirus and has resulted in a global pandemic. The World Health Organization recommended avoiding any delay or disruption of immunization services, as this could result in increases in outbreak-prone vaccine-preventable diseases. This study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on parents' behaviour towards their children's scheduled vaccinations. METHODOLOGY: This web-based cross-sectional study recruited 1,143 parents/guardians of children below six years of age living in Saudi Arabia between May 1 and May 30, 2020 via social media platforms. A self-developed online questionnaire consisting of eight items was used. Simple and multiple binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with vaccine delay during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: The parents/guardians were aged 20-60 years; 82% were aged between 20 and 39 years. It was found that 26% of parents did not vaccinate their children on time according to the national immunization schedule in regular situations, and 38% of parents reported delaying vaccination due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The multiple logistic regression analysis found that having two or more children, living in Riyadh or the Western region or not vaccinating children during regular situations were associated with an increased risk of vaccine delay during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Delaying children's vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic was influenced most by living in regions with high COVID-19 prevalence and having two or more children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Health Behavior , Immunization Schedule , Parents/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255517, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The reopening of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns about widespread infection and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in educational settings. In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) initiated prospective national surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 in primary schools across England (sKIDs). We used this opportunity to assess the feasibility and agreeability of large-scale surveillance and testing for SARS-CoV-2 infections in school among staff, parents and students. METHODS: Staff and students in 131 primary schools were asked to complete a questionnaire at recruitment and provide weekly nasal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR testing (n = 86) or swabs with blood samples for antibody testing (n = 45) at the beginning and end the summer half-term. In six blood sampling schools, students were asked to complete a pictorial questionnaire before and after their investigations. RESULTS: In total, 135 children aged 4-7 years (n = 40) or 8-11 years (n = 95) completed the pictorial questionnaire fully or partially. Prior to sampling, oral fluid sampling was the most acceptable test (107/132, 81%) followed by throat swabs (80/134, 59%), nose swabs (77/132, 58%), and blood tests (48/130, 37%). Younger students were more nervous about all tests than older students but, after completing their tests, most children reported a "better than expected" experience with all the investigations. Students were more likely to agree to additional testing for nose swabs (93/113, 82%) and oral fluid (93/114, 82%), followed by throat swabs (85/113, 75%) and blood tests (72/108, 67%). Parents (n = 3,994) and staff (n = 2,580) selected a preference for weekly testing with nose swabs, throat swabs or oral fluid sampling, although staff were more flexible about testing frequency. CONCLUSIONS: Primary school staff and parents were supportive of regular tests for SARS-CoV-2 and selected a preference for weekly testing. Children preferred nose swabs and oral fluids over throat swabs or blood sampling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Educational Personnel/psychology , Students/psychology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , England , Humans , Nasopharynx/virology , Parents/psychology , Pharynx/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256692, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374153

ABSTRACT

Parent-child conversations are important for children's cognitive development, children's ability to cope with stressful events, and can shape children's beliefs about the causes of illness. In the context of a global pandemic, families have faced a multitude of challenges, including changes to their routines, that they need to convey to their children. Thus, parent-child conversations about the coronavirus pandemic might convey information about the causes of illness, but also about how and why it is necessary for children to modify their behaviors to comply with new social norms and medical guidance. The main goal of this study was to examine the questions children ask about the COVID-19 pandemic and how parents answer them. This survey included responses from a national sample of 349 predominantly white parents of children between the ages of 3 and 12 recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk in United States. Parents reported that although children asked about COVID-19 and its causes (17.3%), children asked primarily about lifestyle changes that occurred as a result of the pandemic (24.0%) and safety (18.4%). Parents reported answering these questions by emphasizing that the purpose of different preventative measures was to protect the child (11.8%) or the family (42.7%) and providing reassurance (13.3%). Many parents discussed how it was their social responsibility to slow the spread of the virus (38.4%). Parents of younger children tended to shield them from information about COVID-19 (p = .038), while parents with more knowledge were more likely to provide explanations (p < .001). Our analysis shows that families not only discuss information about the virus but also information about changes to their lifestyle, preventative measures, and social norms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
14.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 348-357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373363

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has exacerbated the challenges that newcomer refugee and immigrant families face. While many of the supports that schools typically offer were disrupted by the pandemic, school-based assistance remains critical in this challenging context. In addition to education-related challenges, many newcomer families have been disproportionately impacted across financial, employment, and health contexts. The present study highlights the perspectives of newcomer families to understand their experiences, stressors, and ability to cope during the pandemic, as well as how their school communities can offer support to mitigate the potential for increased disparities. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 parents (Mage = 38.68) and 13 students (Mage = 14.31) engaged in a school-based intervention for newcomer students. Among students, 71.4% were identified as male, and the majority of caregivers were mothers (85.7%). Newcomer families reported significant challenges due to COVID-19, including difficult social-emotional adjustment, financial challenges, and significant academic difficulties. Themes also emerged related to sources of support and coping. Implications for how schools can further support newcomer families given these challenges and strengths are considered. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Family/psychology , Refugees/psychology , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Parents/psychology , Qualitative Research , Schools
15.
Health Psychol ; 40(7): 428-438, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Italy by specifically looking at the psychosocial response of children/adolescents with neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD) and their parents, and explored which factors could potentially contribute to increasing or mitigating stress-related behaviors in children/adolescents as well as their parents' stress. METHOD: An online anonymous survey was designed to investigate family demographic characteristics, COVID-19 outbreak and restriction-related variables, children/adolescents' behavioral regulation problems, parental stress, and resilience. Data were collected from 1,472 parents (83.1% mothers) of 1632 NDD children/adolescents (33.7% females). RESULTS: Compared to pre-emergency, parents reported a significant increase in their children's behavioral regulation problems: Anxious/depressed behavior, Attention problems, and Aggressive behavior (p < .001), and they reported feeling more Overwhelmed and Burdened (p < .001) as parents but less Unfulfilled, Numbness, Devastated, and Angry (p < .001). A hierarchical stepwise regression analysis revealed that both behavioral regulation problems in NDD children/adolescents and parental stress are-at least partially-buffered by resilience factors in parents (Perception of self, Planned future, Family cohesion). CONCLUSIONS: Results showed that behavioral regulation problems in children/adolescents with NDD and parental stress increased. However, parental resilience can act as a protective factor, counterbalancing parental difficulties in the care of their NDD children during the emergency. Identifying risk and protective factors impacting the psychosocial response ofchildren/adolescents with NDD and their parents is essential to implement appropriate support interventions both for parents and children/adolescents with NDD during the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Protective Factors , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(31): e227, 2021 Aug 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination is necessary to reach herd immunity and essential for mitigating the spread of the pandemic. In May 2021, the US FDA and the EU have expanded the emergency use authorization for a COVID-19 vaccine to children aged 12 to 15. The aim of this study was to investigate parental acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination for their children, factors affecting their acceptability, and children's perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines in Republic of Korea. METHODS: We conducted a questionnaire survey at two tertiary hospitals from May 25, 2021 to June 3, 2021. Subjects were parents having children under 18 years and children aged 10-18 years. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-six parents and 117 children aged 10-18 years were included in the final analysis. Overall, 76.5% and 64.2% of parents intended to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and intended to have their children vaccinated, respectively. However, only 49.6% of children responded that they would get COVID-19 vaccination. In the multivariate analysis, high confidence in the safety of COVID-19 vaccines (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-24.12), parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves (AOR, 19.42; 95% CI, 6.85-64.00), and awareness of the need to vaccinate children against COVID-19 (AOR, 13.15; 95% CI, 4.77-41.27) were associated with positive factors intention to vaccinate their children. CONCLUSION: This study provides insight into how parents think about the COVID-19 vaccine for their children in South Korea. Our findings could be referenced in establishing a policy for childhood COVID-19 vaccination in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Parents/psychology , Patient Medication Knowledge , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Attitude , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Republic of Korea , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
17.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(3): 180-186, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359438

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 rapidly spread worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we aimed to detect parental concerns along with their awareness of and attitudes towards COVID-19 among patients admitted to our inpatient and outpatient clinics. METHODS: This study was conducted at a children's hospital with 141 parents of children who were patients in the inpatient and outpatient clinics. Parents were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire and psychiatric scales that included the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Impact of Events Scale-Revised form (IES-R). RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 141 parents, of which 59 were parents of inpatients and 82 were parents of outpatients. The most known COVID-19 symptoms were fever, difficulty in breathing, and cough, respectively. The most preferred precaution was "staying at home." We found a significant positive correlation between the number of precautions and BAI score (R = .169, P = .046). Inpatients' parents IES-R scores were significantly higher than outpatients' parents IES-R scores. CONCLUSIONS: Parents were found to be aware of the COVID-19 pandemic regardless of education status and family income. Participants' IES-R scores revealed significant differences in terms of COVID-19 impact on psychological health between the parents of inpatient and outpatient children; inpatients' parents were more concerned about COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Awareness , COVID-19/diagnosis , Parents/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Adult , Child , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Pediatr Diabetes ; 22(7): 1071-1080, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348165

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study explored pre-pandemic sociodemographics, medical characteristics, social/family support, and mood symptoms, and current COVID-19 experiences as predictors of mood, positive/negative diabetes-specific experiences, and COVID-19-specific distress among parents of children with type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that parents from marginalized backgrounds, youth with higher pre-pandemic A1c and no CGM use, parents with lower pre-pandemic social/family support and more pre-pandemic mood/anxiety symptoms, and those with more negative COVID-19 experiences would have more depressive symptoms, fewer positive and more negative diabetes-specific experiences, and more COVID-19-specific distress during the initial months of the pandemic. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants were parents of early school-age children with type 1 diabetes (n = 100; 65% non-Hispanic, white, 92% mothers, 75% married; Mchild age  = 6.74 ± 1.59 years) who had completed a behavioral intervention trial ≥6 months ago and were re-contacted in June/July 2020 to report on their COVID-19 pandemic experiences and parent psychosocial outcomes. Pre-pandemic parent mood/anxiety symptoms, family/social support, and children's medical characteristics (CGM use; MA1C  = 8.17% ± 1.40%) were assessed M = 1.45 ± 0.59 years prior. RESULTS: More pre-pandemic social support predicted fewer depressive symptoms, more positive diabetes-specific experiences, and less COVID-19-specific distress during the pandemic. More pre-pandemic depressive symptoms predicted more depressive symptoms during the pandemic. More life disruptions due to the pandemic were associated with more negative diabetes-specific experiences and more COVID-19-specific distress. Parents of color had more negative diabetes-specific experiences. CONCLUSIONS: Social support may be particularly important to assess and address through intervention. Pediatric diabetes care providers should monitor parent experiences in relation to children's diabetes management. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02527525.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Male , Parenting/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Schools , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Time Factors , United States
19.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341536

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Assess the degree to which US parents are likely to have their children get coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines and identify parental concerns about the vaccines. METHODS: In February 2021 to March 2021, we surveyed parent members of a nationally representative probability-based Internet panel of ∼9000 adults regarding their intent to have their children receive a COVID-19 vaccination, perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines for children, and trust in sources of information about COVID-19 vaccines for children. We used descriptive and multivariate analyses to evaluate parent-stated likelihood of having their children get a COVID-19 vaccine and to assess the association between likelihood of child COVID-19 vaccination and child age, parent demographics, and parental perceptions about COVID-19 vaccines. RESULTS: Altogether, 1745 parents responded (87% of eligible parents, 3759 children). Likelihood of child COVID-19 vaccination was as follows: very likely (28%), somewhat likely (18%), somewhat unlikely (9%), very unlikely (33%), and unsure (12%). The stated likelihood of child vaccination was greater among parents of older children (P < .001) as well as among parents who had a bachelor's degree or higher education (P < .001), had already received or were likely to receive a COVID-19 vaccine (P < .001), or had Democratic affiliation (P < .001); variations existed by race and ethnicity (P = .04). Parental concerns centered around vaccine safety and side effects. A key trusted source of information about COVID-19 vaccines for children was the child's doctor. CONCLUSIONS: Less than one-half of US participants report that they are likely to have their child receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Pediatric health care providers have a major role in promoting and giving COVID-19 vaccination for children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Intention , Parents/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Trust , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
20.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255149, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331998

ABSTRACT

Previous literature on the psychological impact of COVID-19 has shown a direct relationship between family conflicts and psychological distress among parents and their children during the domestic lockdown and social isolation; but there are also opportunities to enhance family bonding, encourage collective problem-solving and improve personal relationships. This study aimed to explore psychological adjustment processes of Spanish adolescents and their parents during the first month of lockdown by analyzing their narratives, perceived outcomes, protection and risk factors. A total of 142 people agreed to participate in this study. Of all participants, 61 were adolescents (M = 13.57; SD = 1.74; 57% women) and 81 were parents (M = 46.09; SD = 4.72; 91% mothers). All were Spanish residents and completed an online survey during the domestic lockdown in March 2020. From a qualitative design, methodology followed a mixed approach to analyze data. The results showed three different types of adaptation to lockdown and social isolation in both adolescents and their parents: 1) positive adjustment, 2) moderate adjustment, and 3) maladjustment. Most participants reported a good adjustment and only a 20% of parents and a 16% of adolescents stated that they had not been able to achieve a positive psychological adjustment. There are few significant quantitative differences between adolescents and their parents. The qualitative analysis of data showed that adolescents reported less psychological distress than their parents. The two most important protective factors were social support and keeping busy during lockdown. The most significant risk factors were loss of mobility and social isolation. The conclusions stressed that regarding psychological maladjustment, parents experienced feelings of uncertainty whereas adolescents experienced a kind of mourning process. These findings can be used to design and implement effective intervention measures for mental health and psychological well-being in such a difficult situation as domestic lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emotional Adjustment/physiology , Parents/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Psychological Distress , Spain , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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