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1.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 179, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted parental and child mental health and wellbeing in the UK. This study aimed to explore the experiences of parents of children with rare neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions with a known or suspected genetic cause (neurogenetic) across the first year of the pandemic in the UK. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 parents of children with rare neurogenetic conditions. Parents were recruited via opportunity sampling from the CoIN Study, a longitudinal quantitative study exploring the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of families with rare neurogenetic conditions. Interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes were identified: (1) "A varied impact on child wellbeing: from detrimental to 'no big drama'"; (2) "Parental mental health and wellbeing: impact, changes, and coping"; (3) "'The world had shut its doors and that was that': care and social services during the pandemic"; and (4) "Time and luck: abstract concepts central to parents' perspectives of how they coped during the pandemic". The majority of parents described experiencing an exacerbation of pre-pandemic challenges due to increased uncertainty and a lack of support, with a minority reporting positive effects of the pandemic on family wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: These findings offer a unique insight into the experiences parents of children with rare neurogenetic conditions across the first year of the pandemic in the UK. They highlight that the experiences of parents were not pandemic-specific, and will continue to be highly relevant in a non-pandemic context. Future support should to be tailored to the needs of families and implemented across diverse future scenarios to promote coping and positive wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Mental Health
2.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286578, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243054

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Companionship in antenatal care is important for facilitating positive parental experiences. During the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions on partner attendance at fetal ultrasound scans were introduced nationally to minimise transmission of the virus. This study aimed to explore the effect of these restrictions on maternal and paternal experiences of pregnancy scans and evaluate their potential effect on parent-fetal bonding. METHODS: A UK-wide, anonymous cross-sectional survey was completed by new and expectant parents (n = 714) who had, or were awaiting a pregnancy scan during the COVID-19 pandemic. The CORE-10 and an adapted version of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory were used to evaluate psychological distress and prenatal bonding. Additional survey questions captured parental experiences of scans. Separate statistical and thematic analyses of the data were undertaken. A joint display matrix was used to facilitate integration of quantitative and qualitative claims to generate a comprehensive interpretation of study findings. FINDINGS: When fathers did not attend the scan, feelings of excitement and satisfaction were significantly reduced (p<0.001) and feelings of anxiety increased (p<0.001) in both parents. Mothers were concerned about receiving unexpected news alone and fathers felt excluded from the scan. Mean paternal bonding (38.22, SD 10.73) was significantly lower compared to mothers (47.01, SD 7.67) although no difference was demonstrated between those who had attended the scan and those who had not. CORE-10 scores suggested low-to-mild levels of psychological distress, although the mean difference between mothers and fathers was not significant. Key themes described both parents' sense of loss for their desired pregnancy scan experience and reflected on sonographers' central role in providing parent-centred care during scans. CONCLUSION: Restrictions on partner attendance at scans during the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect on parental experiences of antenatal imaging. Provision of parent-centred care, which is inclusive of partners, is essential for improved parental experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prenatal Care , Male , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Prenatal Care/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Mothers/psychology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Psychol Trauma ; 15(5): 888-894, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234244

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine psychological stress experienced by parents and posttraumatic emotional stress experienced by children during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The study has cross-sectional design and included parents who have 3- to 10 year-old children studying at kindergartens and primary schools under the Yozgat Directorate of National Education in Turkey, and who volunteered to participate in the study. The study was completed with 1,109 parents. School administrators were informed of the study and an online data collection form was distributed through parent WhatsApp groups. RESULTS: Fathers at or above the age of 37 were found to have lower Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10-PDS) scores (p < .05). In the study, K10-PDS scores of parents working as health care employees and Pediatric Emotional Distress Scale (PEDS) scores of their children were significantly higher than those of other groups (p < .05). K10-PDS scores of parents with children in the 3-6 age group who had behavioral changes, increased screen usage, and disturbed sleep and diet were found to be higher than those of other groups (p < .05). According to regression analysis K10-PDS scores of parents significantly explained 34% of children's PEDS score (R² = .340) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: This study determined that COVID-19 causes children to experience posttraumatic stress disorder. In addition, the study found increased stress levels of parents and children experiencing posttraumatic stress disorder. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
4.
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr ; 72(4): 323-341, 2023 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327456

ABSTRACT

Behavioural strengths and psychosocial problems in children and adolescents between the ages of 3 and 15 are reported. The survey is based on a household-representative sample of 2,421 parents or guardians providing information on their everyday family-life in summer 2021 by online-questionnaire. 704 of the respondents participated again in the spring of 2022. In result, the behaviour of a quarter of the children and adolescents is described as psychosocially borderline/abnormal over the survey period (SDQ total). About a third of children and adolescents have emotional problems, behavioural problems or problems with their peers (respective SDQ-subscales). The proportion of primary-school children with emotional problems increases from summer 2021 to the following spring. Families in which children with disabilities live are disproportionally more affected. The results are discussed with regard to the SDQ standard values available for Germany, as well as the families' self-reported supportneeds and their planned use of professional support-services. Given the psychosocial burden of children, adolescents and their families presented here, which become apparent well after the closures of day-care centres and schools, or other contact-restricting measures to contain the pandemic, have ended, it remains of interest to observe how their well-being will further develop over time.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Problem Behavior , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Child, Preschool , Surveys and Questionnaires , Self Report , Germany , Parents/psychology
5.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1158698, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327111

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study aims to shed light on parent-child relationships and the psychological health of parents from low-income families after the easing of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited 553 parents of children aged 13-24 years in low-income community settings. The Parent-Child Conflict scale of the Parental Environment Questionnaire (PEQ) was used to measure parent-child conflict. Psychological distress was assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale short form (DASS-21). Results: The study revealed a low level of parent-child conflict in the overall study population, with a median PEQ of 48.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 36 to 48). Concerning demographics, married parents reported a likelihood of having a higher level of parent-child conflict over 3 times higher than single parents (OR = 3.18 95%, CI 1.30-7.75). More parent-child conflicts were also found in parents aged 60-72 years old who were unemployed, retired, or housewives and from lower-income groups. In regard to lifestyle factors, a higher level of physical activity and having enough sleep were associated with lower levels of parent-child conflict. Only approximately 1% of the participants reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress. Discussion: Low risk exists for parent-child conflict and psychological sequelae following the easing of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, which could be due to various support measures implemented by the government. Vulnerable parents identified as being at risk of parent-child conflict warrant attention in future advocacy efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Parents/psychology , Parent-Child Relations , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 309, 2023 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326431

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Caring for a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be extremely difficult, yet evidence-based support strategies for parents/carers are limited. A detailed understanding of parent support needs is an important first step in intervention development and qualitative research with this focus is currently lacking. In this study, the viewpoints of parents and professionals were used to understand support needs and preferences when caring for a child with OCD. This qualitative descriptive study formed part of a wider UK-based project aimed at developing better support for parents of children with OCD. METHOD: Individual semi-structured interviews (and an optional one-week journal) with a purposive sample of parents of children and young people (CYP) with OCD, aged 8-18, and focus groups (or individual interviews where preferred) with a purposive sample of professionals supporting CYP with OCD. Data comprised transcripts of audio-recorded interviews and focus groups, and text from journals. Analysis was informed by the Framework approach involving inductive and deductive coding, supported by NVivo 12.0 software. Co-production methods were adopted throughout the research process, including the involvement of a parent co-researcher and charity collaborators. RESULTS: Interviews were undertaken with 20 parents, of which 16 completed a journal. Twenty-five professionals took part in a focus group or interview. Five key themes relating to parent support challenges and support needs/preferences were identified (1) Coping with the impact of OCD; (2) Getting help for my child; (3) Understanding parents' role; (4) Making sense of OCD; (5) Joined-up care. CONCLUSION: Parents caring for children with OCD have clear caregiver support needs which are currently not being met. Through triangulation of parent and professional accounts, this study has identified parent support challenges (e.g., emotional impact of OCD, visibility of caring role, misunderstanding about OCD) and support needs/ preferences (e.g., headspace/respite, compassion/sensitivity, guidance on accommodation) to lay the vital foundations for the development of effective parent support interventions. There is now an urgent need to develop and test an intervention to support parents in their caregiving role, with the aim of preventing and/or reducing their levels of burden and distress and ultimately, improving their quality of life.


Subject(s)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Quality of Life , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Parents/psychology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/therapy , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Qualitative Research , United Kingdom
7.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(2): 189-191, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315787

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Rapid implementation of home sleep studies during the first UK COVID-19 'lockdown'-completion rates, family feedback and factors that predict success. DESIGN: We included all patients who had a sleep study conducted at home instead of as inpatient from 30 March 2020 to 30 June 2020. Studies with less than 4 hours of data for analysis were defined 'unsuccessful'. RESULTS: 137 patients were included. 96 underwent home respiratory polygraphy (HRP), median age 5.5 years. 41 had oxycapnography (O2/CO2), median age 5 years. 56% HRP and 83% O2/CO2 were successful. A diagnosis of autism predicted a lower success rate (29%) as did age under 5 years. CONCLUSION: Switching studies rapidly from an inpatient to a home environment is possible, but there are several challenges that include a higher failure rate in younger children and those with neurodevelopmental disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Polysomnography/methods , Self-Testing , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/diagnosis , Adolescent , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Perception , Polysomnography/psychology , Polysomnography/standards , Quarantine/standards , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e23, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315150

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the experiences of caregivers of children with tracheostomies. DESIGN: Qualitative semistructured interviews. SETTING: All participants were currently, or had previously cared for, a tracheostomised child who had attended a tertiary care centre in the North of England. Health professionals were purposively sampled to include accounts from a range of professions from primary, community, secondary and tertiary care. PARTICIPANTS: Carers of children with tracheostomies (n=34), including health professionals (n=17) and parents (n=17). INTERVENTIONS: Interviews were undertaken between July 2020 and February 2021 by telephone or video link. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Qualitative reflexive thematic analysis with QSR NVivo V.12. RESULTS: The pandemic has presented an additional and, for some, substantial challenge when caring for tracheostomised children, but this was not always felt to be the most overriding concern. Interviews demonstrated rapid adaptation, normalisation and varying degrees of stoicism and citizenship around constantly changing pandemic-related requirements, rules and regulations. This paper focuses on four key themes: 'reconceptualising safe care and safe places'; 'disrupted support and isolation'; 'relationships, trust and communication'; and 'coping with uncertainty and shifting boundaries of responsibility'. These are described within the context of the impact on the child, the emotional and physical well-being of carers and the challenges to maintaining the values of family-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: As we move to the next phase of the pandemic, we need to understand the impact on vulnerable groups so that their needs can be prioritised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Parents/psychology , Tracheostomy , Adaptation, Psychological , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Social Support , Trust
9.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285723, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In order for Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) to be effective, data-based information on families' resources, burden and current use of support services for families with young children, as well as on children's health and development is needed. The study Kinder in Deutschland [Children in Germany]-KiD 0-3 2022 aims at providing these data to help us understand families' situation and needs in Germany now, including families' experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The study will recruit up to 300 pediatricians who will invite parents of children aged up to 48 months to participate in the study during a well-child visit. Parents (goal N = 8,000) will complete an online-questionnaire with their own web-enabled device. Pediatricians will complete a short questionnaire about each participating family. The questionnaires cover family psychosocial burden and resources, child health and development, use of family support services, as well as the families' experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data will be analyzed to assess patterns of families´ psychosocial burdens and resources, use of support services for families with young children, and children´s health and development. Concordance between parent and pediatrician report will be assessed and comparisons with the predecessor study of 2015 will be drawn. DISSEMINATION: Findings will be disseminated through scientific conferences, open access peer-reviewed journals, and dissemination channels of the National Centre for Early Prevention. DISCUSSION: The present study will provide parent and pediatrician reports on how families with young children are doing in Germany. These data will be used to inform Germany's early childhood intervention (ECI) program ("Frühe Hilfen") on current needs of families with young children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Child, Preschool , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Child Health
10.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285249, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313472

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact and exposure of COVID-19 on parent mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), for parents of children with hearing loss. The survey was distributed via an electronic survey to families subscribed to a pediatric program listserv as part of a university medical center. Fifty-five percent of parents reported elevated symptoms of anxiety, while 16% scored in the clinically significant range for depression. In addition, 20% of parents reported elevated symptoms of PTSD. Liner regressions found that impact of COVID-19 predicted anxiety symptoms, while both impact and exposure predicted depression and PTSD symptoms. In addition, both impact and exposure predicted COVID related parental distress. Exposure and impact of COVID-19 has had negative consequences on parents of children with hearing loss. Although exposure influenced parental mental health, impact uniquely affected depression and PTSD. Results highlight the need for mental health screening, as well implementation of psychological interventions using telehealth or in-person consultations. Future work should focus on post-pandemic challenges, including long-term psychological functioning due to the established relationship between parental mental health and pediatric outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Child , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
13.
Early Hum Dev ; 181: 105773, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303588

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study compares results of a group-based intervention developed to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in parents of premature infants with a prior study using an individual version of the treatment manual. METHODS: 26 mothers of preterm infants (25-34 weeks' gestational age; >600 g) received 6 sessions of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Outcomes were compared with those of a previously published RCT, which tested an individual therapy based on the same model in a group of 62 mothers. Results were also compared across in-person and telehealth treatment. RESULTS: From baseline to follow up, the individual intervention showed greater improvement in trauma symptoms assessed with the Davidson Trauma Scale (d = 0.48, p = 0.016), although both conditions showed clinically significant improvement. Similar patterns were found for maternal depression and anxiety. In-person treatment was found to be superior to telehealth treatment administered during the COVID-19 pandemic, although the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Group-based trauma focused CBT is an effective treatment modality for parents of premature infants with symptoms of psychological distress but not as effective as individual therapy using the same treatment model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Infant , Female , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Infant, Premature/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Parents/psychology
14.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 73(Suppl 2)(2): S80-S87, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302169

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To explore the family dynamics of coronavirus disease-2019 survivors from the perspective of parents and children. Method: The descriptive, qualitative study was conducted from May 27 to December 7, 2021, in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, and comprised parents and children of individuals who survived a coronavirus disease-2019 infection. Data was collected through in-depth interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The descriptive, qualitative study was conducted from May 27 to December 7, 2021, in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, and comprised parents and children of individuals who survived a coronavirus disease-2019 infection. Data was collected through in-depth interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Coronavirus disease-2019 patients, in addition to medical support need psychosocial support for better health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Child , Parents/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Family Relations , Qualitative Research , Survivors
15.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20508, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272094

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to overlap with the seasonal influenza epidemic, increasing the risk of overextending the health system capacity in Switzerland. Influenza vaccine uptake has remained low in most countries, including Switzerland. The aim of the study was to determine parents’ intentions towards influenza vaccination of their children, as well as themselves, and to assess regional differences. METHODS: Parents presenting to four paediatric emergency departments (Zurich, Bern, Bellinzona, Geneva) were asked to complete an online survey during and after the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic (April to June 2020). The anonymised survey included demographic information, vaccination history and intentions to vaccinate against influenza, as well as attitudes towards future vaccination against COVID-19. RESULTS: The majority of children (92%; 602/654) were up-to-date on their vaccination schedule. In 2019/2020, 7.2% (47/654) were vaccinated against influenza. Children with chronic illnesses were more frequently vaccinated than healthy children (19.2% vs 5.6%; p = 0.002). For the coming winter season, 111 (17%) parents stated they plan to vaccinate their children against influenza, more than double the rate from last year, and 383 (59.2%) parents suggested they will vaccinate against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. Regional differences between “German” and “Latin” Switzerland were found for parents’ intent to have their children vaccinated against influenza next season (Zurich and Bern 14.3%, Bellinzona and Geneva 27.2%, p <0.001), but not for a hypothetical vaccination against COVID-19 (Zurich and Bern 59.1%, Bellinzona and Geneva 59.7%, p = 0.894). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a substantial increase of parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against influenza, especially in hard-hit “Latin” Switzerland. The Swiss government and public health organisations can leverage these regional results to promote influenza vaccination among children for the coming seasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Intention , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Switzerland
16.
Infancy ; 28(4): 793-806, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273343

ABSTRACT

Understanding predictors and effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic is a top-priority in research endeavors. The impact of COVID-19 on all components of family life and mental health cannot be overstated. This study emphasizes the need to investigate predictors of parents' responses to disaster by conceptualizing the depth of the impact of the pandemic using Bronfenbrenner's Bioecological Systems Model. We evaluate parents of infants as the center of the microsystem and discuss the importance of parents' responses to the pandemic for children's development. Specifically, utilizing a prospective design involving a sample of 105 infant-mother-father triads, we test the predictive effects of mothers' and fathers' mental health and infant externalizing behavior assessed prior to the pandemic when infants were 16-months on later pandemic related distress (PRD) approximately 1 year later. Results indicate that for both mothers and fathers, more depressive symptoms during their child's infancy predicted more PRD. Although mothers' reports of more child externalizing behavior significantly predicted more PRD, fathers' reports of externalizing were strongly, positively correlated with their concurrent depressive symptoms but not directly related to PRD. We demonstrate the importance of pre-existing mental health and parents' perceptions of their children's behavior as early as 16 months, in coping with disaster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Depression , Parents/psychology , Mothers/psychology
17.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 4863, 2023 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272702

ABSTRACT

Several risk factors of children's mental health issues have been identified during the pandemic of COronaVIrus Disease first appeared in 2019 (COVID-19). This study aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the association between parents' and children's mental health issues during the COVID-19 school closure in France. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data collected in the SAPRIS-ELFE study during the COVID-19 pandemic in France. Using multinomial logistic regressions, we estimated associations between parents' and children's mental health issues. Symptoms of anxiety were assessed by the General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and depression by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for the parents. Hyperactivity/inattention and emotional symptoms in children were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The sample included 3496 children aged 8 to 9 years, of whom 50.0% were girls. During the school closure, 7.1% of responding parents had moderate to severe levels of anxiety and 6.7% had moderate to severe levels of depression. A total of 11.8% of the children had an abnormal hyperactivity/inattention score and 6.6% had an abnormal emotional symptoms score. In multivariate regression models, parental moderate to severe level of anxiety and moderate to severe level of depression were associated with abnormal hyperactivity-inattention score (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 3.31; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.33-4.70 and aOR 4.65; 95% CI 3.27-6.59, respectively) and abnormal emotional symptoms score in children (aOR 3.58; 95% CI 2.33-5.49 and aOR 3.78; 95 CI 2.47-5.78 respectively). Children whose parents have symptoms of anxiety and/or depression have an increased likelihood of symptoms of hyperactivity/inattention and emotional symptoms during school closures in France due to COVID-19. Our findings suggest that public health initiatives should target parents and children to limit the impact of such crises on their mental health issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Female , Humans , Child , Male , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Schools , Parents/psychology
18.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0272101, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early relational health is a key determinant of childhood development, while relational trauma in the parent-infant dyad can instigate a cascading pattern of infant risk. Fortunately, early relational trauma is detectable and modifiable. In 2018, Australian Maternal and Child Health (MCH) nurses participated in MERTIL (My Early Relational Trauma-Informed Learning), a program to identify and prevent relational trauma. Program evaluations revealed nurses felt competent and confident to identify and respond to relational trauma; however, response capacity was inhibited by inadequate parent referral options. In response, MERTIL for Parents (My Early Relational Trust-Informed Learning) was developed, which is an online, evidence-based, self-paced parenting program that focuses on enhancing parental knowledge of relational trust and its significance for infant development. This low-cost, accessible prevention resource targets emerging relational concerns to reduce later service system engagement. The potential for universal preventative online programs that target parental and relational wellbeing remains under-explored. This paper reports on a protocol for implementing a MERTIL for Parents pilot study describing practitioners' and parents' perspectives on program feasibility and efficacy. METHODS: This study is a mixed methods, parallel armed, uncontrolled, repeated measures design. We aim to recruit 48 Australian MCH practitioners from the states of Victoria and New South Wales. These professionals will in turn recruit 480 parents with a child aged 0-5 years. All parents will receive MERTIL for Parents, which entails a 40-minute video, tipsheets, posters, and support resources. Parent data will be obtained at three periods: pre-program, program exit, and program follow-up. Practitioner data will be collected at two periods: pre-parent recruitment and program follow-up. Data collection will occur through surveys and focus groups. Primary parent outcomes will be socioemotional assessments of program efficacy. Practitioners and parents will each report on program feasibility. DISCUSSION: This protocol describes the feasibility and efficacy of a new online parenting program, MERTIL for Parents, with pilot field studies commencing in March 2023. We anticipate that this resource will be a valuable addition to various child and family services, for use in individual support and group work.


Subject(s)
Parenting , Trust , Child , Infant , Humans , Parenting/psychology , Pilot Projects , Australia , Parents/psychology , Parent-Child Relations
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282682

ABSTRACT

As a multidimensional and universal stressor, the COVID-19 pandemic negatively affected the mental health of children, adolescents, and adults worldwide. In particular, families faced numerous restrictions and challenges. From the literature, it is well known that parental mental health problems and child mental health outcomes are associated. Hence, this review aims to summarize the current research on the associations of parental mental health symptoms and child mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted a systematic literature search in Web of Science (all databases) and identified 431 records, of which 83 articles with data of over 80,000 families were included in 38 meta-analyses. A total of 25 meta-analyses resulted in significant small to medium associations between parental mental health symptoms and child mental health outcomes (r = 0.19 to 0.46, p < 0.05). The largest effects were observed for the associations of parenting stress and child mental health outcomes. A dysfunctional parent-child interaction has been identified as a key mechanism for the transmission of mental disorders. Thus, specific parenting interventions are needed to foster healthy parent-child interactions, to promote the mental health of families, and to reduce the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Mental Health , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Child , Parents/psychology
20.
Behav Ther ; 54(3): 557-571, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282289

ABSTRACT

Although the efficacy of online administration of behavioral parent training (BPT) programs is well-established, such programs address a single risk factor (behavioral functioning) for school readiness difficulties (comprised of academics, cognitive skills, and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning). The current study aims to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a telemedicine delivery of the School Readiness Parenting Program (SRPP), an integrative adaptation of PCIT designed to address the behavioral and academic domains of school readiness. The present study takes the first step towards validating an online administration of the SRPP as a treatment for early childhood disruptive behavior. Data were collected for 64 children ages 2-6 years (Mage = 4.63, SD = 0.86; 78.1% Hispanic/Latinx) and their families, who received either in-person administration of time-limited PCIT (PCIT-TL; n=30) or online administration of SRPP (n=34). A series of repeated measures ANOVAS were conducted to examine within and between group effects. Results revealed that both SRPP and PCIT-TL significantly reduced inattention (d's = -0.54 to -0.88), aggression (d's = -0.55 to -1.06), and behavioral symptomology (d's = -0.55 to -0.85) and produced significant gains in parental skills (d's = -1.47 to 2.99). Notably, online SRPP demonstrated greater improvement in positive parental verbalization, whereas PCIT-TL demonstrated greater reductions in parental stress. Overall, findings support the utility of online SRPP for addressing behavioral school readiness concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Problem Behavior , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , Problem Behavior/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Parent-Child Relations , Schools
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