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1.
Neurol Sci ; 43(7): 4069-4079, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899195

ABSTRACT

Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated neuropathy, possibly triggered by a recent infection or vaccination, and driven by an immune attack targeting the peripheral nervous system. GBS typically leads to ascending limb weakness, often with sensory and cranial nerve involvement 1-2 weeks after immune stimulation, but emergency and neurology physicians should be aware of its important clinical heterogeneity. In rare cases, bilateral facial nerve palsy can be the main clinical manifestation, as the case of the variant formerly known as bilateral facial weakness with paresthesias. An increasing number of case reports of GBS in patients receiving COVID-19 vaccination have been reported both during the pre-clinical phase and after large-scale authorities' approval. We report two cases of bifacial palsy with paresthesias, a rare variant of GBS, both occurring after the first dose of COVID-19 vaccine Vaxzevria™ (formerly COVID-19 vaccine AstraZeneca), showing a favorable outcome after high-dose immunoglobulin therapy, and discuss the literature of GBS post-COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Humans , Paresthesia , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
Acta Neurol Belg ; 122(3): 753-761, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several neurologic complications have been reported in close temporal association with both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and following vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. Specifically, several cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been reported in temporal relationship with COVID-19 vaccination, with two small case series describing a specific phenotype with bifacial weakness and paresthesia in the limbs. METHODS: We retrospectively collected patients who developed a new-onset neuromuscular disorder in the first 6 weeks after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine (either first or second dose). The patients were collected from one tertiary care centre and one secondary care centre from February to July 2021. RESULTS: We report eight patients who developed phenotypically diverse neuromuscular disorders in the weeks following COVID-19 vaccination, with a presumed immune-mediated etiology. In our case series, we report three patients with classical GBS, one patient with bifacial weakness with paresthesia variant of GBS, two patients with subacute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one patient with brachial plexopathy and one patient with subacute axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: New-onset neuromuscular disorders with onset in the weeks after COVID-19 vaccination can include diverse phenotypes. A causal relationship between these disorders and the vaccine cannot be proven at present, and further epidemiological studies are needed to further investigate this association.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/chemically induced , Humans , Paresthesia/chemically induced , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Am J Emerg Med ; 56: 391.e1-391.e3, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702213

ABSTRACT

As of January 2022, there have been over 350 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the world. The most common symptoms in those infected are fever, cough, malaise, and myalgia, however pulmonary, hematologic, gastrointestinal, renal, and neurologic complications have also been reported. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an uncommon neurological syndrome characterized by acute or subacute spinal cord dysfunction that can lead to paresthesias, sensory and autonomic impairment, and even paralysis. Etiologies are often unclear; however, potential causes include infection, neoplastic, drug or toxin induced, autoimmune, and acquired. Treatment for ATM primarily consists of steroids and plasmapheresis, which often reverses any neurologic symptoms. ATM has rarely been reported as a complication of COVID-19 infections. A 43-year-old female presented to the emergency department for evaluation of progressive numbness and tingling in her legs ten days after developing upper respiratory symptoms from a COVID-19 infection. Physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a diagnosis of ATM. During her hospital course, she experienced rapid progression of her paresthesias and developed complete loss of motor function in her upper and lower extremities. Within 48 hours after emergency department arrival, she required intubation due to worsening diaphragmatic and chest wall paralysis. Her treatment included a long-term steroid regimen and plasmapheresis, and unfortunately, she did not have any neurologic recovery. We present a very rare case of ATM progressing to complete quadriplegia following COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myelitis, Transverse , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Myelitis, Transverse/diagnosis , Myelitis, Transverse/etiology , Myelitis, Transverse/therapy , Paresthesia/complications , Quadriplegia/etiology
4.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30066, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687285

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We present a patient with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which occurred 1 month after a SARS-CoV-2 infection. While GBS as complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection has been described many times, only a few cases of post-COVID-19 bifacial weakness and paraesthesia are known to date. RESULTS: A 59-year-old man presented with thoracoradicular pain, paraesthesias of hands and feet, as well as progressive bilateral facial palsy. Neurological examination revealed a hyporeflexia of his lower limbs and hypoaesthesia of his hands and feet. Clinical and electrophysiological findings as well as CSF analysis were consistent with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia. The patient's condition improved promptly after 5 days of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. DISCUSSION: We suspect bifacial weakness and paraesthesia to be a possible post-infectious complication of COVID-19. Hence, it is a differential diagnosis of facial nerve palsy in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Considering the rarity of GBS and bifacial weakness and paraesthesia, it appears unlikely that bigger trials elucidating the causal relation between them and SARS-CoV-2 infection will be available in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain , Paresthesia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 36(6): 790-796, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673165

ABSTRACT

Scalp dysesthesia is an abnormal sensation of the scalp in the absence of cutaneous disease. It is characterized by a burning and/or itching sensation and can be related to a variety of neurogenic or psychogenic causes. This condition is extremely bothersome and is also common- especially among the geriatric population, in women, in patients with diabetes mellitus, and patients with psychiatric history. However, despite its prevalence in many populations, there are limited data about its causes and characteristics. Given its limited cutaneous manifestations, it is also easily misdiagnosed and an underrecognized cause of scalp pruritus in the dermatological community. Therefore, education on scalp dysesthesia is paramount to helping physicians identify and provide appropriate treatment for these patients. This review focuses predominantly on the neurogenic causes (with a brief review of psychogenic itch) of scalp dysesthesia and the therapeutics that have been found to be effective for this condition. Neurogenic causes of scalp dysesthesia occur with damage to the central or peripheral pathways of itch sensation, resulting in modification and heightened sensitivity of nerves that result in abnormal sensations in the absence of or out of proportion to external stimuli. A comprehensive review of etiologies is provided here, ranging from lesions to the central nervous system caused by cervical spine disease, trigeminal trophic syndrome, tumor, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, to small-fiber neuropathies caused by diabetes, brow lifts, keloid, and burn scarring. Recently, there have also been reports of scalp dysesthesias associated with post-infectious COVID-19. Treatment options tailored toward disease severity and different causes of disease will also be discussed. By elucidating the different mechanisms and therapeutic treatments of scalp dysesthesia, we hope to provide clinicians with the tools to identify and treat this condition as well as encourage further research into its etiologies and therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Diseases , Aged , Female , Humans , Paresthesia/etiology , Pruritus/etiology , Scalp , Skin Diseases/complications
7.
Rev Fac Cien Med Univ Nac Cordoba ; 78(4): 405-407, 2021 12 28.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599769

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemics began, multiple cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome secondary to COVID-19 have been described. Its typical presentation consists of the triad of paresthesia, ascending muscle weakness and areflexia, although there are several regional variants such as facial diplegia. Case presentation: Two weeks after a contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19, a 35-year-old woman presents with viral myopericarditis. Laboratory studies for autoimmune diseases come back negative, as well as multiple viral serologies. She presents anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG, with negative PCR. A week after discharge she presents with palsy of both facial nerves, without other neurological abnormalities. She undergoes examination with cranial CT without findings, and an EMG which shows bilateral alteration of facial nerves. She refuses the performance of a lumbar puncture. Discussion: Facial diplegia can occur because of several illnesses, such as meningeal or brainstem tumors, infectious agents, Guillain-Barre syndrome, autoimmune diseases, trauma, metabolic causes or congenital causes. In our patient, having discarded other etiologies with imaging and analytical studies, the most probable cause is the Guillain-Barre syndrome. It is possibly secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection given the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies after contact with a confirmed case. Conclusion: This case supports the hypothesis that COVID-19 may trigger the Guillain-Barre syndrome, specifically as facial diplegia, which is an atypical variant that should be known to be early diagnosed and treated as part of this syndrome.


Introducción: Desde que se inició la pandemia por el SARS-CoV-2, se han descrito numerosos casos de síndrome de Guillain-Barré secundario a la COVID-19. Su presentación típica es la triada de parestesias, debilidad muscular ascendente y arreflexia, aunque hay diversas variantes regionales como la diplejía facial. Presentación del caso: Mujer de 35 años que, dos semanas después de un contacto estrecho con un caso confirmado de COVID-19, ingresa por miopericarditis probablemente viral, con estudio de autoinmunidad negativo, múltiples serologías virales negativas y positividad para IgG anti-SARS-CoV-2 con PCR negativa. Una semana tras el alta presenta paresia de ambos nervios faciales sin otras alteraciones neurológicas. Se realiza TAC craneal sin hallazgos y EMG que evidencia afectación bilateral de los nervios faciales. La paciente rechaza realización de punción lumbar Discusión: La diplejía facial puede ocurrir en el contexto de diversas patologías, como tumores meníngeos o troncoencefálicos, agentes infecciosos, síndrome de Guillain-Barré, patologías autoinmunes, traumatismos, causas metabólicas o causas congénitas. En el caso descrito tras descartar mediante pruebas de imagen y analíticamente el resto de etiologías, y dada la presentación clínica, permanece como causa más probable el síndrome de Guillain-Barré, posiblemente secundario a infección por SARS-CoV-2 dada la positividad de IgG anti-SARS-CoV-2 tras un contacto con un caso confirmado. Conclusión: Este caso apoya la hipótesis de que la COVID-19 puede desencadenar el síndrome de Guillain-Barré, específicamente en forma de diplejía facial, una variante atípica que se debe conocer para su identificación y manejo precoz como parte de este síndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Adult , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Paresthesia , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30066, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We present a patient with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which occurred 1 month after a SARS-CoV-2 infection. While GBS as complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection has been described many times, only a few cases of post-COVID-19 bifacial weakness and paraesthesia are known to date. RESULTS: A 59-year-old man presented with thoracoradicular pain, paraesthesias of hands and feet, as well as progressive bilateral facial palsy. Neurological examination revealed a hyporeflexia of his lower limbs and hypoaesthesia of his hands and feet. Clinical and electrophysiological findings as well as CSF analysis were consistent with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia. The patient's condition improved promptly after 5 days of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. DISCUSSION: We suspect bifacial weakness and paraesthesia to be a possible post-infectious complication of COVID-19. Hence, it is a differential diagnosis of facial nerve palsy in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Considering the rarity of GBS and bifacial weakness and paraesthesia, it appears unlikely that bigger trials elucidating the causal relation between them and SARS-CoV-2 infection will be available in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain , Paresthesia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(9)2020 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304172

ABSTRACT

Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are known to be variable with growing evidence of nervous system involvement. In this case report, we describe the symptoms of a patient infected with SARS-CoV-2 whose clinical course was complicated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We present a case of a 58-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia due to symptoms of fever and cough. Two weeks later, after the resolution of upper respiratory tract symptoms, she developed symmetric ascending quadriparesis and paresthesias. The diagnosis of GBS was made through cerebrospinal fluid analysis and she was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin administration.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Low Back Pain/physiopathology , Muscle Weakness/physiopathology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Gabapentin/therapeutic use , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lumbar Vertebrae/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Radiculopathy/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord/diagnostic imaging
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 30, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110741

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is an infection due to a novel virus belonging to the coronavirus family. Since December 2019, first human cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Wuhan (China) and rapidly has been progressed to a global pandemic declared by the world health organization (WHO) on March 11th 2020. The major complication of COVID-19, is pneumonia, but other presentations like cardiovascular and neurological complications have been reported. Herein, we report a first case of pregnant women presented with bifacial weakness and paraesthesia (BFP) associated to a vestibulocochlear neuritis as post-COVID-19 manifestation. This is a 36-year-old Moroccan female patient with a history of SARS-CoV-2 positive 6 weeks before admission. She presented to the emergency department with rapid bifacial paralysis, bilateral lower extremity paresthesia, vertigo, nausea, vomiting and right auricular pain. An acute stroke was ruled out after neurological examination and brain MRI. Clinical presentation, neurophysiological, audiometry and videonystagmography workup additionally to CSF findings were suggestive of a variant of Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS), which is BFP associated to right vestibulocochlear neuritis. The patient was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) therapy associated with intravenous steroids. The patient made a complete recovery of the right facial palsy and the sensorineural hearing loss but still have tingling in lower limbs and left facial palsy at 2 weeks´ follow-up. BFP can be induced by COVID-19 as a postinfectious immune-mediated complication. Regarding the pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis, is probably similar to other viral infection causing nerve damage. Clinicians should consider the association of vestibulocochlear neuritis and BFP as a post SARS-CoV-2 manifestation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Vestibular Neuronitis/virology , Adult , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Paresthesia/virology , Pregnancy , Vestibular Neuronitis/diagnosis
15.
Rev Neurosci ; 32(3): 351-361, 2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067453

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has infected more than 27 million confirmed cases and 8,90,000 deaths all around the world. Verity of viral infections can infect the nervous system; these viral infections can present a wide range of manifestation. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the COVID-19 associated central nervous system manifestations, mental and neurological symptoms. For that we conducted a comprehensive systematic literature review of four online databases, including Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus and Embase. All relevant articles that reported psychiatric/psychological symptoms or disorders in COVID-19 without considering time and language restrictions were assessed. All the study procedures were performed based on the PRISMA criteria. Due to the screening, 14 studies were included. The current study result indicated that, the pooled prevalence of CNS or mental associated disorders with 95% CI was 50.68% (6.68-93.88). The most prevalence symptoms were hyposmia/anosmia/olfactory dysfunction (number of study: 10) with 36.20% (14.99-60.51). Only one study reported numbness/paresthesia and dysphonia. Pooled prevalence of numbness/paresthesia and dysphonia was 5.83% (2.17-12.25) and 2.39% (10.75-14.22). The pooled prevalence of depression and anxiety was 3.52% (2.62-4.54) and 13.92% (9.44-19.08). Our findings demonstrate that COVID-19 has a certain relation with neurological symptoms. The hypsomia, anosmia or olfactory dysfunction was most frequent symptom. Other symptoms were headache or dizziness, dysgeusia or ageusia, dysphonia and fatigue. Depression, anxiety, and confusion were less frequent symptoms.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Depression/epidemiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Dysgeusia/epidemiology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Dysphonia/epidemiology , Dysphonia/physiopathology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Hypesthesia/epidemiology , Hypesthesia/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Paresthesia/epidemiology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1035259

ABSTRACT

We describe a case of delayed onset, acute demyelinating neuropathy secondary to novel SARS-CoV-2 infection. A previously healthy 46-year-old man presented with bilateral leg pain and loss of sensation in his feet 53 days after having COVID-19 pneumonitis. He developed painful sensory symptoms followed by a rapidly progressive lower motor neuron weakness involving all limbs, face and respiratory muscles, needing ventilatory support. In keeping with a diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome, cerebrospinal fluid examination showed albuminocytologic dissociation and nerve conduction studies supported the diagnosis of an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. The delayed neurological dysfunction seen in our patient following SARS-CoV-2 infection may indicate a novel mechanism of disease that is part of the emerging 'long COVID-19 syndrome'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Muscle Weakness/physiopathology , Neuralgia/physiopathology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Electrodiagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Late Onset Disorders , Male , Middle Aged , Neural Conduction , Noninvasive Ventilation , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
17.
Neurology ; 96(11): e1527-e1538, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is protean in its manifestations, affecting nearly every organ system. However, nervous system involvement and its effect on disease outcome are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to determine whether neurologic syndromes are associated with increased risk of inpatient mortality. METHODS: A total of 581 hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, neurologic involvement, and brain imaging were compared to hospitalized non-neurologic patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Four patterns of neurologic manifestations were identified: acute stroke, new or recrudescent seizures, altered mentation with normal imaging, and neuro-COVID-19 complex. Factors present on admission were analyzed as potential predictors of in-hospital mortality, including sociodemographic variables, preexisting comorbidities, vital signs, laboratory values, and pattern of neurologic manifestations. Significant predictors were incorporated into a disease severity score. Patients with neurologic manifestations were matched with patients of the same age and disease severity to assess the risk of death. RESULTS: A total of 4,711 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were admitted to one medical system in New York City during a 6-week period. Of these, 581 (12%) had neurologic issues of sufficient concern to warrant neuroimaging. These patients were compared to 1,743 non-neurologic patients with COVID-19 matched for age and disease severity admitted during the same period. Patients with altered mentation (n = 258, p = 0.04, odds ratio [OR] 1.39, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.86) or radiologically confirmed stroke (n = 55, p = 0.001, OR 3.1, CI 1.65-5.92) had a higher risk of mortality than age- and severity-matched controls. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of altered mentation or stroke on admission predicts a modest but significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality independent of disease severity. While other biomarker factors also predict mortality, measures to identify and treat such patients may be important in reducing overall mortality of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Confusion/physiopathology , Consciousness Disorders/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality , Stroke/physiopathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/physiopathology , Anosmia/epidemiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Ataxia/epidemiology , Ataxia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Confusion/epidemiology , Consciousness Disorders/epidemiology , Cranial Nerve Diseases/epidemiology , Cranial Nerve Diseases/physiopathology , Delirium/epidemiology , Delirium/physiopathology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paresthesia/epidemiology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , Primary Dysautonomias/epidemiology , Primary Dysautonomias/physiopathology , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/physiopathology , Stroke/epidemiology , Vertigo/epidemiology , Vertigo/physiopathology
18.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 41(9): 1707-1711, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024489

ABSTRACT

We report a case of bifacial weakness with paresthesia, a recognized Guillain-Barré syndrome subtype characterized by rapidly progressive facial weakness and paresthesia without ataxia or other cranial neuropathies, which was temporally associated with antecedent coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). This case highlights a potentially novel but critically important neurologic association of the COVID-19 disease process. Herein, we detail the clinicoradiologic work-up and diagnosis, clinical course, and multidisciplinary medical management of this patient with COVID-19. This case is illustrative of the increasingly recognized but potentially underreported neurologic manifestations of COVID-19, which must be considered and further investigated in this pandemic disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Paresthesia/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
19.
Brain Behav Immun ; 88: 11-16, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a novel pneumonia leading to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Recent studies documented that SARS-Coronavirus2 (SARS-CoV2), responsible for COVID-19, can affect the nervous system. The aim of the present observational study was to prospectively assess subjective neurological symptoms (sNS) in patients with SARS-CoV2 infection. METHODS: We included patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Rome "Tor Vergata", medical center dedicated to the treatment of patients with COVID-19 diagnosis, who underwent an anamnestic interview about sNS consisting of 13 items, each related to a specific symptom, requiring a dichotomized answer. RESULTS: We included 103 patients with SARS-CoV2 infection. Ninety-four patients (91.3%) reported at least one sNS. Sleep impairment was the most frequent symptom, followed by dysgeusia, headache, hyposmia, and depression. Women more frequently complained hyposmia, dysgeusia, dizziness, numbeness/paresthesias, daytime sleepiness, and muscle ache. Moreover, muscle ache and daytime sleepiness were more frequent in the first 2 days after admission. Conversely, sleep impairment was more frequent in patients with more than 7 days of hospitalization. In these patients we also documented higher white blood cells and lower C-reactive protein levels. These laboratory findings correlated with the occurrence of hyposmia, dysgeusia, headache, daytime sleepiness, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SARS-CoV2 infection frequently present with sNS. These symptoms are present from the early phases of the disease. The possibly intrinsic neurotropic properties of SARS-CoV2 may justify the very high frequency of sNS. Further studies targeted at investigating the consequences of SARS-CoV2 infection on the CNS should be planned.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Depression/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Sleepiness , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Depression/epidemiology , Dizziness/epidemiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/epidemiology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypesthesia/epidemiology , Hypesthesia/physiopathology , Italy/epidemiology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Paresthesia/epidemiology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Distribution , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology
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