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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263266, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705228

ABSTRACT

Characteristics of patients at risk of developing severe forms of COVID-19 disease have been widely described, but very few studies describe their evolution through the following waves. Data was collected retrospectively from a prospectively maintained database from a University Hospital in Paris area, over a year corresponding to the first three waves of COVID-19 in France. Evolution of patient characteristics between non-severe and severe cases through the waves was analyzed with a classical multivariate logistic regression along with a complementary Machine-Learning-based analysis using explainability methods. On 1076 hospitalized patients, severe forms concerned 29% (123/429), 31% (66/214) and 18% (79/433) of each wave. Risk factors of the first wave included old age (≥ 70 years), male gender, diabetes and obesity while cardiovascular issues appeared to be a protective factor. Influence of age, gender and comorbidities on the occurrence of severe COVID-19 was less marked in the 3rd wave compared to the first 2, and the interactions between age and comorbidities less important. Typology of hospitalized patients with severe forms evolved rapidly through the waves. This evolution may be due to the changes of hospital practices and the early vaccination campaign targeting the people at high risk such as elderly and patients with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Machine Learning , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1094, 2022 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634513

ABSTRACT

France went through three deadly epidemic waves due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing major public health and socioeconomic issues. We proposed to study the course of the pandemic along 2020 from the outlook of two major Parisian hospitals earliest involved in the fight against COVID-19. Genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were performed on samples from patients and health care workers (HCWs) from Bichat (BCB) and Pitié-Salpêtrière (PSL) hospitals. A tree-based phylogenetic clustering method and epidemiological data were used to investigate suspected nosocomial transmission clusters. Clades 20A, 20B and 20C were prevalent during the spring wave and, following summer, clades 20A.EU2 and 20E.EU1 emerged and took over. Phylogenetic clustering identified 57 potential transmission clusters. Epidemiological connections between participants were found for 17 of these, with a higher proportion of HCWs. The joint presence of HCWs and patients suggest viral contaminations between these two groups. We provide an enhanced overview of SARS-CoV-2 phylogenetic changes over 2020 in the Paris area, one of the regions with highest incidence in France. Despite the low genetic diversity displayed by the SARS-CoV-2, we showed that phylogenetic analysis, along with comprehensive epidemiological data, helps to identify and investigate healthcare associated clusters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genome, Viral , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
3.
Indoor Air ; 32(1): e12967, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1553741

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the impact of the lockdown restriction measures in the Paris area on the variation of in-vehicle ultrafine particle (UFP) and black carbon (BC) concentrations between the pre- and post-lockdown period and professional drivers' working conditions and practices. The study was conducted with 33 taxi drivers. UFP and BC were measured inside their vehicles with DiSCmini® and microAeth® , respectively, on two typical working days pre- and post-lockdown. Job characteristics were self-reported. Our results showed that post-lockdown, both the number of clients and journey duration significantly decreased. Taxi drivers opened their windows significantly more and reduced the use of air recirculation. UFP decreased significantly by 32% and BC by 31% post-lockdown, with a weaker positive correlation compared to pre-lockdown. The reduction of in-vehicle UFP was due mainly to the reduction of traffic flow and ventilation settings, though the latter probably varied according to traffic conditions. The variation of in-vehicle BC also tended to be related to the decrease in traffic flow post-lockdown. We emphasize the role of traffic emissions on in-vehicle air pollution and that preventive measures such ventilation settings would help to minimize the exposure of professional drivers and passengers to air pollutants.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution, Indoor , Air Pollution , COVID-19 , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , Communicable Disease Control , Environmental Monitoring , Humans , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Particulate Matter/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Vehicle Emissions/analysis
4.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(11): 1733-1738, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic led to a strict lockdown in France from March 17 to May 11, 2020. After the lockdown, the French strategy to mitigate the impact of SARS-CoV-2 relied partly on investigations of all confirmed cases. Monitoring collective settings is particularly important since SARS-CoV-2 seems prone to superspreading events (SSEs). METHODS: Our study is based on data gathered in Paris from May 11 to December 31, 2020, by the Ile-de-France Regional Health Agency (RHA) to investigate cases occurring in collective and high-risk settings. Specific events in high-risk settings were systematically transmitted to the RHA, and screenings were organized by the facilities, while other settings were reported when three cases were identified within a short period. These settings were more difficult to identify through the surveillance system since no systematic screening was organized by the facility, leaving screenings to rely on the national contact-tracing programme. No official superspreading threshold has been set for SARS-CoV-2. We defined a SSE as an event involving ten cases. RESULTS: We analysed 15,706 events associated with 38,670 cases, representing an average of 2.70 cases per event. Most clusters occurred in educational facilities, workplace environments, social care settings, and healthcare facilities. SSEs represented 3.4% but accounted for 28% of all cases reported. The highest number of SSEs occurred in college settings (12.6%), followed by hospitals and retirement homes. Educational facilities had the lowest number of SSEs, with around 1% in preschools and elementary schools. CONCLUSIONS: We observed different SSE rates in each setting. Preschools and primary schools represented the majority of events but experiencing very few SSEs. Colleges were prone to SSEs and were associated with a high number of secondary cases. These findings provide some insights on contact tracing activities and SARS-CoV-2 transmission in different settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
6.
Dig Liver Dis ; 54(1): 10-18, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a dramatic impact on cancer diagnosis and treatment. Most patients newly diagnosed with digestive system cancer are aged 65 and over. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, observational, multicentre cohort study based on prospectively collected electronic health records. All adults aged 65 or over and having been newly treated for a digestive system cancer between January 2018 until August 2020 were enroled. RESULTS: Data on 7882 patients were analysed. The first COVID-19 lockdown period led to a 42.4% decrease in newly treated digestive system cancers, and the post-lockdown period was associated with a 17% decrease. The decrease in newly treated digestive system cancer did not differ as a function of age, sex, comorbidities, primary tumour site, and disease stage. The proportion of patients admitted to an emergency department increased during the lockdown period. We do not observe a higher 3-month mortality rate in 2020, relative to the corresponding calendar periods in 2018 and 2019. CONCLUSION: To avoid a decrease in newly treated cancers during future lockdown periods, access to healthcare will have to be modified. Although 3-month mortality did not increase in any of the patient subgroups, the 2020 cohort must be followed up for long-term mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Neoplasms/epidemiology , Digestive System Neoplasms/therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 355, 2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was frequently used to treat patients with severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19)-associated acute respiratory distress (ARDS) during the initial outbreak. Care of COVID-19 patients evolved markedly during the second part of 2020. Our objective was to compare the characteristics and outcomes of patients who received ECMO for severe COVID-19 ARDS before or after July 1, 2020. METHODS: We included consecutive adults diagnosed with COVID-19 in Paris-Sorbonne University Hospital Network ICUs, who received ECMO for severe ARDS until January 28, 2021. Characteristics and survival probabilities over time were estimated during the first and second waves. Pre-ECMO risk factors predicting 90-day mortality were assessed using multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS: Characteristics of the 88 and 71 patients admitted, respectively, before and after July 1, 2020, were comparable except for older age, more frequent use of dexamethasone (18% vs. 82%), high-flow nasal oxygenation (19% vs. 82%) and/or non-invasive ventilation (7% vs. 37%) after July 1. Respective estimated probabilities (95% confidence intervals) of 90-day mortality were 36% (27-47%) and 48% (37-60%) during the first and the second periods. After adjusting for confounders, probability of 90-day mortality was significantly higher for patients treated after July 1 (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.02-5.07). ECMO-related complications did not differ between study periods. CONCLUSIONS: 90-day mortality of ECMO-supported COVID-19-ARDS patients increased significantly after July 1, 2020, and was no longer comparable to that of non-COVID ECMO-treated patients. Failure of prolonged non-invasive oxygenation strategies before intubation and increased lung damage may partly explain this outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/mortality , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Paris/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
9.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(11): 2389-2395, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340466

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, other respiratory illnesses decreased worldwide. This study described the consequences of public health measures on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) severe infections in France, where an interseasonal resurgence of RSV occurred recently. All patients admitted to Necker Hospital (Paris) between August 2018 and April 2021 with a diagnosis of RSV-associated acute lung respiratory infection (ALRI) were enrolled. Characteristics of subjects with RSV-associated ALRI in 2020/2021 were compared to those infected during the two previous outbreaks. Overall, 664 inpatients were diagnosed with RSV-associated ALRI: 229, 183, and 252 during the 2018/2019, 2019/2020, and 2020/2021 outbreaks, respectively. During autumn 2020, a national lockdown began in France but schools remained open. A 3-month delayed RSV epidemic occurred at the end of this lockdown. Compared to previous outbreaks, the 2020/2021 epidemics involved more children aged 6 to 11 months (25.8% versus 13.1%, p < 0.0001), but less infants aged < 6 months (41.3% versus 56.6%, p < 0.0001) and less adults (0.0 versus 2.7%, p < 0.0001). Shorter length of stay at hospital, less frequent requirement of admission to intensive care unit, use of non-invasive ventilation, and/or high-flow nasal oxygen were observed in 2020/2021 than during previous epidemics (p < 0.0001). Delayed RSV outbreak was associated with more hospitalizations for ALRI, higher age of pediatric inpatients, but milder median clinical phenotype. Reinforced public health measures (even while keeping nurseries and schools open with mandatory face masks since six years of age) could impact, at least transiently, the burden of RSV-related hospitalizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Public Health , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Outbreaks , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control , Male , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons
10.
J Epidemiol Community Health ; 75(12): 1143-1146, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that socioeconomic factors are associated with COVID-19 incidence. In this study, we analysed a broad range of socioeconomic indicators in relation to hospitalised cases in the Paris area. METHODS: We extracted 303 socioeconomic indicators from French census data for 855 residential units in Paris and assessed their association with COVID-19 hospitalisation risk. FINDINGS: The indicators most associated with hospitalisation risk were the third decile of population income (OR=9.10, 95% CI 4.98 to 18.39), followed by the primary residence rate (OR=5.87, 95% CI 3.46 to 10.61), rate of active workers in unskilled occupations (OR=5.04, 95% CI 3.03 to 8.85) and rate of women over 15 years old with no diploma (OR=5.04, 95% CI 3.03 to 8.85). Of note, population demographics were considerably less associated with hospitalisation risk. Among these indicators, the rate of women aged between 45 and 59 years (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.44) exhibited the greatest level of association, whereas population density was not associated. Overall, 86% of COVID-19 hospitalised cases occurred within the 45% most deprived areas. INTERPRETATION: Studying a broad range of socioeconomic indicators using census data and hospitalisation data as a readily available and large resource can provide real-time indirect information on populations with a high incidence of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
11.
J Biomol Tech ; 32(2): 50-56, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278691

ABSTRACT

In 2020, research entities at the Institut Pasteur (IP) in Paris, as elsewhere around the world, were closed because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, IP core facilities, laboratories, services, and departments working on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and priority projects were authorized to continue working both on site and remotely. Given the importance of its role in SARS-CoV-2 genome-sequencing initiatives, the IP Biomics core facility was fully functional during the first (i.e., March-June 2020) and second (i.e., November-December 2020) national lockdowns. We describe here how Biomics successfully implemented an emergency management plan to deal with this health crisis. We highlight the internal deployment of the institutional business continuity plan (BCP) through a series of actions. We also address the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on Biomics staff and collaborators. The added value of quality management and the limitations of risk management systems are discussed. Finally, we suggest that the Biomics infrastructure and the BCP described here could be used for benchmarking purposes, for other next-generation sequencing core facilities wishing to implement/improve their processes, and for future major crisis management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Laboratories , Paris/epidemiology
13.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(2): 115430, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess, by rapid tests, the immune status against COVID-19 among Healthcare Workers (HCW) with history of symptoms, and for whom SARS-CoV-2 detection was either not documented or negative. METHODS: Whole blood by finger prick and serum samples were taken from HCW for use with 2 rapid lateral flow tests and an automated immunoassay. RESULTS: Seventy-two HCWs were included, median duration between symptoms onset and serology sampling was 68 days. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were detected by rapid test in 11 HCW (15.3%) and confirmed in the 10 with available serum by the automated immunoassay. The frequency of ageusia or anosmia was higher in participants with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.029, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study, among symptomatic HCW during the first wave in France, showed that 15% had IgG anti-SARS-CoV-2, a higher seroprevalence than in the general population. Rapid lateral flow tests were highly concordant with automated immunoassay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Point-of-Care Testing , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Immunoassay , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies
14.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(8): 1158-1166, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230411

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Studies on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have mainly focused on hospitalized patients or those with severe disease. We aim to assess the clinical characteristics, outcomes and factors associated with hospital admission or death in adult outpatients with COVID-19. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort of outpatients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, registered in the Covidom telesurveillance solution for home monitoring of patients with COVID-19 in the Greater Paris area, from March to August 2020. The primary outcome was clinical worsening, defined as hospitalization or death within 1 month after symptom onset. RESULTS: Among 43 103 patients, mean age was 42.9 years (SD 14.3 years); 93.0% (n = 40 081) of patients were <65 years old and 61.9% (n = 26 688) were women. Of these 43 103 patients, 67.5% (n = 29 104) completed a medical questionnaire on co-morbidities and symptoms. The main reported co-morbidities were asthma (12.8%; n = 3685), hypertension (12.3%; n = 3546) and diabetes (4.8%; n = 1385). A small proportion of all eligible patients (4.1%, 95% CI 3.9-4.2; 1751/43 103) experienced clinical worsening. The rate of hospitalization was 4.0% (95% CI 3.8%-4.2%; n = 1728) and 0.1% (95% CI 0.1%-0.2%; n = 64) died. Factors associated with clinical worsening were male sex, older age, obesity and co-morbidities such as chronic renal disease or cancer under treatment. Probability of worsening was reduced with anosmia/ageusia. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical worsening was rare among outpatients. Male sex, older age and co-morbidities such as chronic renal disease, active cancers or obesity were independently associated with clinical worsening. However, our cohort may include patients younger and healthier than the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Health Surveys , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity , Outpatients , Paris/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Sex Factors
15.
Angiogenesis ; 24(3): 407-411, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Microthrombosis is a hallmark of COVID-19. We previously described von willebrand factor (VWF) and their high molecular weight multimers (HMWMs) as potential trigger of microthrombosis. OBJECTIVES: Investigate VWF activity with collagen-binding assay and ADAMTS13 in COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: Our study enrolled 77 hospitalized COVID-19 patients including 37 suffering from a non-critical form and 40 with critical form. Plasma levels of VWF collagen-binding ability (VWF:CB) and ADAMTS13 activity (ADAMTS13:Act) were measured in the first 48 hours following admission. VWF:CB was increased in critical (631% IQR [460-704]) patients compared to non-critical patients (259% [235-330], p < 0.005). VWF:CB was significantly associated (r = 0.564, p < 0.001) with HMWMs. Moreover, median ADAMTS13:Act was lower in critical (64.8 IU/dL IQR 50.0-77.7) than non-critical patients (85.0 IU/dL IQR 75.8-94.7, p < 0.001), even if no patients displayed majors deficits. VWF:Ag-to-ADAMTS13:Act ratio was highly associated with VWF:CB (r = 0.916, p < 0.001). Moreover, VWF:CB level was highly predictive of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality as shown by the ROC curve analysis (AUC = 0.92, p < 0.0001) in which we identified a VWF:CB cut-off of 446% as providing the best predictor sensitivity-specificity balance. We confirmed this cut-off thanks to a Kaplan-Meier estimator analysis (log-rank p < 0.001) and a Cox-proportional Hazard model (HR = 49.1, 95% CI 1.81-1328.2, p = 0.021) adjusted on, BMI, C-reactive protein, and D-dimer levels. CONCLUSION: VWF:CB levels could summarize both VWF increased levels and hyper-reactivity subsequent to ADAMTS13 overflow and, therefore, be a valuable and easy to perform clinical biomarker of microthrombosis and COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Collagen/metabolism , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Protein Binding , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Bull Cancer ; 108(6): 581-588, 2021 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220743

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with solid cancer or haematologic malignancies have been considered to be more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and to more often develop severe complications. We aimed to compare the differences in clinical features and outcomes of COVID-19 patients with and without cancer. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study of consecutive adult patients hospitalised in a COVID-19 unit at Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France (NCT04320017). RESULTS: Among the 262 patients hospitalised in a medical ward during the pandemics with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis, 62 patients had cancer. Clinical presentation, comorbidities, and outcomes were similar between cancer and non-cancer patients. However, cancer patients were more likely to have been contaminated while being hospitalised. CONCLUSIONS: Oncologic and non-oncologic patients hospitalised for COVID-19 shared similar outcomes in terms of death, admission in intensive care, or thrombosis/bleeding. They should benefit from the same therapeutic strategy as the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Neoplasms/complications , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/mortality , Cross Infection/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/therapy , Paris/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
17.
J Psychosom Res ; 146: 110504, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219301

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to provide information on changes in mental health among disadvantaged immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area and their level of information about Covid-19. METHODS: Prior to the Covid-19 epidemic, the Makasi community-based cohort followed 850 immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area. Between the 1st of April and the 7th of June 2020, all participants scheduled for a follow-up survey were systematically included into an additional COVID-19-related wave of data collection (N = 100). We compared participants' type of housing, level of food insecurity, work and mental health (PHQ9) before and during the first COVID-19-related lockdown, using paired-Mc Nemar chi-2 tests. We next described their level of information on Covid-19 and policy measures, broken down by sex. RESULTS: Among the 100 participants, 68% had no legal residence permit. Food insecurity was more often reported during lockdown than before (62% vs 52%). 9% of participants had a score indicative of severe depression (PHQ9) before lockdown and 17% afterwards (p = 0.17). Only 51% knew about the possibility of asymptomatic transmission of the COVID-19 virus. CONCLUSIONS: This study brings original information on a hard-to-reach population group. Our results suggest that the lockdown had a detrimental impact on various economic and mental health aspects among disadvantaged migrants residing in the Greater Paris area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/ethnology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Paris/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
18.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0250956, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218423

ABSTRACT

Clinical and laboratory predictors of COVID-19 severity are now well described and combined to propose mortality or severity scores. However, they all necessitate saturable equipment such as scanners, or procedures difficult to implement such as blood gas measures. To provide an easy and fast COVID-19 severity risk score upon hospital admission, and keeping in mind the above limits, we sought for a scoring system needing limited invasive data such as a simple blood test and co-morbidity assessment by anamnesis. A retrospective study of 303 patients (203 from Bordeaux University hospital and an external independent cohort of 100 patients from Paris Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital) collected clinical and biochemical parameters at admission. Using stepwise model selection by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), we built the severity score Covichem. Among 26 tested variables, 7: obesity, cardiovascular conditions, plasma sodium, albumin, ferritin, LDH and CK were the independent predictors of severity used in Covichem (accuracy 0.87, AUROC 0.91). Accuracy was 0.92 in the external validation cohort (89% sensitivity and 95% specificity). Covichem score could be useful as a rapid, costless and easy to implement severity assessment tool during acute COVID-19 pandemic waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/blood , Obesity/epidemiology , Paris/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
19.
J Crit Care ; 64: 199-204, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213340

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Studies performed in spontaneously breathing patients with mild to moderate respiratory failure suggested that prone position (PP) in COVID-19 could be beneficial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive critically ill patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in four ICUs. PP sessions lasted at least 3 h each and were performed twice daily. A Cox proportional hazard model identified factors associated with the need of intubation. A propensity score overlap weighting analysis was performed to assess the association between spontaneous breathing PP (SBPP) and intubation. RESULTS: Among 379 patients, 40 underwent SBPP. Oxygenation was achieved by high flow nasal canula in all but three patients. Duration of proning was 2.5 [1.6;3.4] days. SBPP was well tolerated hemodynamically, increased PaO2/FiO2 (78 [68;96] versus 63 [53;77] mm Hg, p = 0.004) and PaCO2 (38 [34;43] versus 35 [32;38] mm Hg, p = 0.005). Neither day-28 survival (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.16-1.16] nor risk of invasive ventilation [sHR 0.96; 95% CI 0.49;1.88] differed between patients who underwent PP and others. CONCLUSIONS: SBPP in COVID-19 is feasible and well tolerated in severely hypoxemic patients. It did not induce any effect on risk of intubation and day-28 mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Blood Gas Analysis , Cannula , Female , Hemodynamics , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Paris/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis
20.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(5): 1033-1036, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The humoral response against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the hemodialysis population, including its dynamics over time, remains poorly understood. METHODS: To analyze initial and long-term humoral responses against SARS-CoV-2 in a hemodialysis population, we retrospectively evaluated findings from SARS-CoV-2 IgG serologic assays targeting the nucleocapsid antigen or spike antigen up to 6 months of follow-up in patients on hemodialysis in the Paris, France, region who had recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). RESULTS: Our analysis included 83 patients (median age 65 years); 59 (71%) were male and 28 (34%) had presented with severe COVID-19. We observed positive initial SARS-CoV-2 IgG antinucleocapsid serology in 74 patients (89%) at a median of 67 days postdiagnosis. By multivariable analysis, immunocompromised status was the only factor significantly associated with lack of an IgG antinucleocapsid antibody response. Follow-up data were available at 6 months postdiagnosis for 60 of 74 patients (81%) with positive initial antinucleocapsid serology, and 15 (25%) of them had negative antinucleocapsid serology at month 6. In total, 14 of 15 sera were tested for antispike antibodies, 3 of 14 (21%) of which were also negative. Overall, 97% of antinucleocapsid-antibody-positive specimens were also antispike-antibody positive. Female sex, age >70 years, and nonsevere clinical presentation were independently associated with faster IgG antinucleocapsid titer decay in multivariable analysis. After adjustment for sex and age >70 years, nonsevere clinical presentation was the only factor associated with faster decay of IgG antispike antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: This study characterizes evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 antibody response in patients on hemodialysis and identifies factors that are associated with lack of seroconversion and with IgG titer decay.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/immunology , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Transplant Recipients , Transplantation Immunology
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