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1.
Acta Neurol Belg ; 122(2): 519-523, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777872

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic has severely jeopardized world health care. The most affected population is of elderly and patients with chronic diseases. The current study aims to investigate the health-related quality of life of Parkinson's disease outpatient dropout patients. METHODS: In this cross-sectional telephonic observational study, we investigated the demographic features and quality of life of Idiopathic PD patients (cases) attending neurology clinics during the pre-COVID-19 pandemic for at least 6 months and dropped out after that. We then compared them with their matched controls, who started visiting clinics once the OPD began functioning again. We used the European quality of life (EQ-5Q-5D) scale to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL). RESULTS: We recruited 31 PD patients and their 42 matched controls. 90.3% of cases reported worsening PD symptoms, and 83.8% were unable to visit a doctor despite the need. The slowness of activities, increase in tremors, and sleep disturbances were the common complaints. 26% of the patients had difficulty procuring the medicines. EQ-5D-5L and Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in cases versus controls with between mean group difference of - 0.2837 (p < 0.001, 95% CI - 0.4269 to - 0.1377) and - 21.985 (p < 0.001, 95% CI - 31.8 to - 12.1), respectively, depicting the poor quality of life of cases. CONCLUSION: There is a significant worsening of disease status and HRQOL of PD patients not attending OPD, which needs urgent interventions. There is an unmet need to actively track these patients and address their issues to provide holistic health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707192

ABSTRACT

Social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted people's lifestyles and daily activities. In this work we compared pre- and post-pandemic clinical outcomes in people with Parkinson's disease, to assess differences according to the type of behaviour and exercise habits adopted by participants. After two months of COVID-19 lockdown, we assessed: changes in exercise behaviour; motor and non-motor aspects of daily life experiences (MDS-UPDRS I & II); activities of daily living (The Schwab & England scale); quality of life (Parkinson Disease Questionnaire); sleep (Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale); falls; and Clinical Global Impression Change. Twenty-seven individuals aged between 57 and 92 years old participated; from these, ten individuals (37%) completely interrupted physical activities, while seventeen (63%) maintained some level of active lifestyle. Regardless of whether they remained active or not, all participants perceived a significant worsening of their clinical condition, reporting an increase in difficulties completing daily activities or chores (37%) and worsening of their health condition (51.8%). The quantifiable influence of exercise habits was borderline for the group who kept active. The active group seem to have a better self-perception of their health condition, although it was not enough to show a clear benefit. People with Parkinson's disease should be informed that being physically active may not be enough and more structured exercise could be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
3.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets ; 21(3): 235-245, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674157

ABSTRACT

It is noticeable how the novel coronavirus has spread from the Wuhan region of China to the whole world, devastating the lives of people worldwide. All the data related to the precautionary measures, diagnosis, treatment, and even the epidemiological data are being made freely accessible and reachable in a very little time as well as being rapidly published to save humankind from this pandemic. There might be neurological complications of COVID-19 and patients suffering from neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease might have repercussions as a result of the pandemic. In this review article, we have discussed the effect of SARS-CoV-2 viral infection on the people affected with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. It primarily emphasizes two issues, i.e., vulnerability to infection and modifications of course of the disease concerning the clinical neurological manifestations, the advancement of the disease and novel approaches to support health care professionals in disease management, the susceptibility to these diseases, and impact on the severity of disease and management.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Management , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
4.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3467-3477, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604178

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is debate as to whether there is an increased risk of COVID-19 infection in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), possibly due to associated factors. This study aimed to systematically review the factors associated with COVID-19 in people with PD. METHODS: A search was carried out in PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science up to November 2020 (updated until 1 April 2021). Observational studies that analyzed factors associated with COVID-19 in people with PD were selected and revised. RESULTS: The authors included six studies (four case-controlled studies and two cross-sectional studies) in the qualitative and quantitative syntheses. The authors found that the following factors were associated with COVID-19 in people with PD: obesity (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.07-2.99, I2 : 0%), any pulmonary disease (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.17-3.15, I2 : 0%), COVID-19 contact (OR: 41.77, 95% CI: 4.77 - 365.56, I2 : 0%), vitamin D supplementation (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.30-0.83, I2 : 0%), hospitalization (OR: 11.78, 95% CI: 6.27-22.12, I2 : 0%), and death (OR: 11.23, 95% CI: 3.92-32.18, I2 : 0%). The authors did not find any significant association between COVID-19 and hypertension, diabetes, cardiopathy, cancer, any cognitive problem, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal or hepatic disease, smoking, and tremor. CONCLUSIONS: Meta-analyses were limited by the number of events and some methodological limitations. Despite this, the authors assessed the available evidence, and the results may be useful for future health policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Parkinson Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3254-3262, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604147

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, a lockdown was imposed in Italy. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions, feelings and unmet needs of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who experienced the 2-month lockdown in a "red zone" in the northern part of Italy during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: The study had a descriptive design that used a cross-sectional online survey which included open-ended questions to elicit responses on the participant's feelings concerning their risk of contracting coronavirus, how their physical activity had changed, and their personal needs, dictated by their condition, which were not met in this pandemic period as compared to previous periods. Demographic data were analysed using descriptive frequencies, while the open-ended questions were analysed using thematic framework analysis. RESULTS: The study included 103 participants (63 men/40 women [61.17 vs. 38.83%]). Framework analysis led to the identification of four main themes: (i) fearing the risk of contracting coronavirus; (ii) reduction of physical activity; (iii) perception of the risk of not being able to access outpatient clinics or support services; and (iv) negative experiences of the important reduction in socialization. The perceptions of unmet needs appeared to be greater than the actual experience, particularly for the reduction in physical activity and the interruption of contacts with the neurologist and other specialists. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights how perceptions and actual experience shape the meaning of living with PD during the pandemic. Worth noting is the divergence between perceptions and real impact in some aspects of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc ; 2021: 2248-2251, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566219

ABSTRACT

Many recent studies show that the COVID-19 pandemic has been severely affecting the mental wellness of people with Parkinson's disease. In this study, we propose a machine learning-based approach to predict the level of anxiety and depression among participants with Parkinson's disease using surveys conducted before and during the pandemic in order to provide timely intervention. The proposed method successfully predicts one's depression level using automated machine learning with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2.841. In addition, we performed model importance and feature importance analysis to reduce the number of features from 5,308 to 4 for maximizing the survey completion rate while minimizing the RMSE and computational complexity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 93: 97-102, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536977

ABSTRACT

Inequalities in mental healthcare and lack of social support during the COVID-19 pandemic have lowered quality of life and increased overall burden of disease in people with Parkinson's (PWP). Although the pandemic has brought attention to these inequalities, they are long standing and will persist unless addressed. Lack of awareness of mental health issues is a major barrier and even when recognized disparities based on race, gender, and socioeconomic factors limit access to already scarce resources. Stigma regarding mental illness is highly prevalent and is a major barrier even when adequate care exists. Limited access to mental healthcare during the pandemic and in general increases the burden on caregivers and families. Historically, initiatives to improve mental healthcare for PWP focused on interventions designed for specialty and academic centers generally located in large metropolitan areas, which has created unintended geographic disparities in access. In order to address these issues this point of view suggests a community-based wellness model to extend the reach of mental healthcare resources for PWP.


Subject(s)
Healthcare Disparities/trends , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health/trends , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Social Support/trends , Health Resources/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Social Support/psychology
8.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 775-783, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection as most of them are at older age. The goal of this study is to update the pooled prevalence of COVID-19 infection in patients with PD. METHODS: Two researchers systematically searched PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and also gray literature including references of the included studies which were published before September 2021. We extracted data regarding the total number of participants, first author, publication year, the country of origin, mean age, number with COVID-19, symptoms, hospitalization, and death. RESULTS: We found 1693 articles by literature search; after deleting duplicates, 798 remained. Thirty articles remained for meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of COVID-19 infection in PD cases was 5% (95%CI: 4-6%) (I2 = 98.1%, P < 0.001). The pooled prevalence of fever in cases with PD was 4% (95%CI: 2-6%) (I2 = 96%, P < 0.001). The pooled prevalence of cough in cases with PD was 3% (95%CI: 2-4%) (I2 = 95.9%, P < 0.001). The pooled prevalence of hospitalization in cases with COVID-19 infection was 49% (95%CI: 29-52%) (I2: 93.5%, P < 0.001). The pooled prevalence of mortality in COVID-19 cases was 12% (95%CI: 10-14%) (I2 = 97.6%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis show that the pooled prevalence of COVID-19 infection in PD cases is 5% besides hospitalization and mortality rates which are 49% and 12%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Aged , Fever , Humans , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 121(9): 152-156, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485583

ABSTRACT

The article provides an overview of the data on the impact of Parkinson's disease on the risk of infection and the course of COVID-19, and also assesses the possible pathogenetic relationship between the SARS-CoV-2 virus, COVID-19 and PD. By penetrating the central nervous system, SARS-CoV-2 can cause not only neurological symptoms, but also exacerbate the course of an existing neurological disease. The impact of Parkinson's disease on the risk of infection and the course of COVID-19 is controversial. However, a number of authors support the opinion that PD is an anti-risk factor for the development of COVID-19, which is associated both with the pathogenesis of the disease and with the used antiparkinsonian drugs, in particular amantadines. There are no clear data indicating higher risk of infection and higher severity of COVID-19 in patients with PD. On the contrary, experimental and clinical data suggest a possible modifying role of α-synuclein and antiparkinsonian drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Antiparkinson Agents/adverse effects , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/drug therapy , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , alpha-Synuclein
10.
Rev Neurol (Paris) ; 178(1-2): 129-136, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401746

ABSTRACT

We compared the prognosis of inpatients with a known diagnosis of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease who have COVID-19 infection with other hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Our cohort study started in October 2020 and ended in May 2021 and included inpatients with COVID-19 infection who were admitted to hospitals. From a total of 67,871 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, a sample of 3732 individuals were selected of which 363 had Alzheimer's, and 259 had Parkinson's disease. All patients had both positive RT-PCR test and positive chest CT for COVID-19. The outcome was dead within 28 days of admission and the predictors were a large number of demographic and clinical features, and comorbidities recorded at patients' bedside. Mortality were 37.5%, 35.1%, and 29.5% in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease; and in other patients, respectively. The hazard ratio for Alzheimer's disease was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.06-1.53, p=0.010) and for Parkinson's disease was 1.17 (95% CI, 0.94-1.46, p=0.171). Age was a predictor of mortality, hazard ratio=1.04 (95% CI, 1.03-1.05, p<0.001). Patients with Alzheimer's disease and COVID-19 infection were older and more likely to have a loss of consciousness on admission (both p≤0.001). We concluded that inpatients with Alzheimer's disease have an increased risk for 28-day mortality from COVID-19 and healthcare settings should be ready to provide critical care for them such as early intubation and immediate O2 therapy. However, Parkinson's disease does not significantly predict higher mortality of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Neurol ; 269(3): 1107-1113, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the explosion of COVID-19 globally, it was unclear if people with Parkinson's disease (PD) were at increased risk for severe manifestations or negative outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To report on people with PD who had suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to understand how COVID-19 manifested in PD patients. METHODS: We surveyed PD patients who reported COVID-19 to their Movement Disorders specialists at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and respondents from an online survey administered by the Parkinson's Foundation that assessed COVID-19 symptoms, general clinical outcomes and changes in motor and non-motor PD symptoms. RESULTS: Forty-six participants with PD and COVID-19 were enrolled. Similar to the general population, the manifestations of COVID-19 among people with PD were heterogeneous ranging from asymptomatic carriers (1/46) to death (6/46). The most commonly reported COVID-19 symptoms were fever/chills, fatigue, cough, weight loss, and muscle pain. Worsening and new onset of motor and non-motor PD symptoms during COVID-19 illness were also reported, including dyskinesia, rigidity, balance disturbances, anxiety, depression, and insomnia. CONCLUSION: We did not find sufficient evidence that PD is an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19 and death. Larger studies with controls are required to understand this further. Longitudinal follow-up of these participants will allow for observation of possible long-term effects of COVID-19 in PD patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Anxiety/diagnosis , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Public Health ; 199: 77-86, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377816

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic caused countries across the globe to impose restrictions to slow the spread of the virus, with people instructed to stay at home and reduce contact with others. This reduction in social contact has the potential to negatively impact mental health and well-being. The restrictions are particularly concerning for people with existing chronic illnesses such as Parkinson's disease, who may be especially affected by concerns about the pandemic and associated reduction of social contact. The aim of this review was to synthesise published literature on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the social and psychological well-being of people with Parkinson's disease. STUDY DESIGN: The design of this study is a scoping review. METHODS: We searched five electronic databases for English language articles containing primary data on this topic. RESULTS: Thirty-one relevant studies were found and included in the review. Six main themes were identified: impact of the pandemic on physical and mental health; COVID-19 concerns; access to health care; impact on daily and social activities; impact on physical activity and impact on caregivers. Levels of perceived risk of COVID-19 differed across studies, but most participants had adopted preventive measures such as staying at home and reducing social contacts. Participants in many studies reported a discontinuation of regular healthcare appointments and physiotherapy, as well as concerns about being able to obtain medication. Loss of daily activities and social support was noted by many participants. There was mixed evidence on the impact of the pandemic on physical exercise, with some studies finding no change in physical activity and others reporting a reduction; generally, participants with reduced physical activity had poorer mental health and greater worsening of symptoms. Caregivers of people with Parkinson's disease were more likely to be negatively affected by the pandemic if they cared for people with complex needs such as additional mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had negative effects on the physical and mental health of people with Parkinson's disease, perhaps due to disruption of healthcare services, loss of usual activities and supports and reduction in physical activity. We make recommendations for policy, practice and future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets ; 21(3): 235-245, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367729

ABSTRACT

It is noticeable how the novel coronavirus has spread from the Wuhan region of China to the whole world, devastating the lives of people worldwide. All the data related to the precautionary measures, diagnosis, treatment, and even the epidemiological data are being made freely accessible and reachable in a very little time as well as being rapidly published to save humankind from this pandemic. There might be neurological complications of COVID-19 and patients suffering from neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease might have repercussions as a result of the pandemic. In this review article, we have discussed the effect of SARS-CoV-2 viral infection on the people affected with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. It primarily emphasizes two issues, i.e., vulnerability to infection and modifications of course of the disease concerning the clinical neurological manifestations, the advancement of the disease and novel approaches to support health care professionals in disease management, the susceptibility to these diseases, and impact on the severity of disease and management.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Management , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
15.
J Neurol Phys Ther ; 45(4): 266-272, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with Parkinson disease (PD) are known to be at risk of physical inactivity and may therefore be especially vulnerable to negative health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic due to social distancing recommendations. PURPOSE: To investigate sensor-derived physical activity and perceived health of people with PD during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the factors associated with these outcomes. METHODS: Physical activity was measured over 7 days using the Actigraph GT3x accelerometer. Data were collected regarding perceived health status and physical activity habits, as well as rehabilitation attendance during the pandemic. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with physical activity and perceived changes in health. RESULTS: Of 89 participants, a majority (67%) reported a pandemic-related reduction in exercise habits. Women more commonly reported a reduction in scheduled exercise and cancelled rehabilitation than men. Study participants took on average 5876 ± 3180 steps per day. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, being 70 years of age and older, and greater reported mobility problems were associated with being less physically active. A pandemic-induced deterioration in health was reported by 42% and women were 5 times more likely than men to do so (odds ratio: 5.12, 95% confidence interval, 1.87-15.03; P = 0.002). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Despite a pandemic-related reduction in reported exercise habits and rehabilitation, the participants in this Swedish sample were relatively physically active. However, women were less active at moderate-vigorous levels and were at greater risk of deterioration in perceived health during this time.Video Abstract available for more insight from the authors (see the Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A359).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden/epidemiology
16.
J Neurol ; 268(12): 4415-4421, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326824

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, WHO declared Covid-19 outbreak pandemic. There has been increasing evidence that frail, old, multi-pathological patients are at greater risk of developing severe Covid-19 infection than younger, healthy ones. Covid-19's impact on Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients could be analysed through both the influence on PD patients' health and their risk of developing severe Covid-19, and the consequences of lockdown and restrictive measures on mental and cognitive health on both patients and caregivers. Moreover, there are critical issues to be considered about patients' care and management through an unprecedented time like this. One important issue to consider is physiotherapy, as most patients cannot keep exercising because of restrictive measures which has profoundly impacted on their health. Lastly, the relationship between PD and Sars-Cov2 may be even more complicated than it seems as some studies have hypothesized a possible Covid-19-induced parkinsonism. Hereby, we review the state of the art about the relationship between Covid-19 and Parkinson's Disease, focusing on each of these five points.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 284, 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of COVID-19 social distancing on the function, health, and well-being of people with Parkinson disease (PD), and test the association of these effects with patients' activation levels, i.e., their skills and confidence in managing their health. METHODS: Community-dwelling individuals with PD answered an anonymous web-based survey. Part 1 included 27 multiple-choice questions regarding changes in function, health, medical care, and well-being. Part 2 consisted of the Patient Activation Measure, which enquired about skills and confidence in managing one's health. RESULTS: Respondents (N = 142) reported decreases in various function (24.8%-37.3%), health (33.8%-43%), and well-being (26.1%-47.1%) domains. Rehabilitation ceased for 61.2%. Among those reporting a worsening of health, 67.8% associated this with the cessation of rehabilitative treatments or decrease in physical activity. Patients' activation levels were inversely correlated with increased assistance for activities of daily living, increased tiredness, worsening symptoms, and lack of support from family and friends. CONCLUSIONS: Social distancing had a major negative impact on the health and function of people with PD. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Supporting people with PD skills and confidence in managing health may preserve their physical and mental health during this period of dramatic changes in life's circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Physical Distancing , Self-Management/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Health Behavior/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Self-Management/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Neurol ; 268(8): 2666-2670, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317543

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Parkinson's disease (PD) is more frequent in the elderly and increases the risk of respiratory infections. Previous data on PD and SARS-CoV-2 are scarce, suggesting a poor prognosis in advanced disease and second-line therapies. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study comparing patients with PD and COVID-19 and patients with PD without COVID-19 was conducted during the pandemic period in Spain (March 1st-July 31st 2020) in a tertiary university hospital. RESULTS: Thirty-nine (COVID-19 +) and 172 (COVID-19-) PD patients were included. Fifty-nine percent were males in both groups, with similar age (75.9 ± 9.0 COVID-19 + , 73.9 ± 10.0 COVID-19-), disease duration (8.9 ± 6.2 COVID-19 + , 8.5 ± 5.6 COVID-19-) and PD treatments. COVID-19 was mild in 10 (26%), required admission in 21 (54%) and caused death in 8 (21%) patients. Dementia was the only comorbidity more frequent in COVID-19 + patients (36% vs. 14%, p = 0.0013). However, in a multivariate analysis, institutionalization was the only variable associated with COVID-19 + (OR 17.0, 95% CI 5.0-60.0, p < 0.001). When considering severe COVID-19 (admission or death) vs. mild or absent COVID-19, institutionalization, neoplasm, dementia and a lower frequency of dopamine agonists were associated with severe COVID-19. In multivariate analysis, only institutionalization [OR 5.17, 95% CI 1.57-17, p = 0.004] and neoplasm [OR 8.0, 95%CI 1.27-49.8, p = 0.027] remained significantly associated. CONCLUSION: In our experience, institutionalization and oncologic comorbidity, rather than PD-related variables, increased the risk of developing COVID-19, and impacted on its severity. These findings suggest that epidemiologic factors and frailty are key factors for COVID-19 morbidity/mortality in PD. Appropriate preventive strategies should be implemented in institutionalized patients to prevent infection and improve prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Male , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/drug therapy , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
19.
Rev Med Virol ; 32(2): e2278, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309015

ABSTRACT

Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who contracted Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) had a decline in motor functions; nevertheless, there is limited evidence on whether PD patients have a higher risk for contracting Covid-19 or have worse outcomes. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to review the impact of PD on the prognosis of Covid-19 patients. We performed a systematic search through seven electronic databases under the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analyses statement (PRISMA) guidelines. The R software version 4.0.2 was used to calculate pooled sample sizes and their associated confidence intervals (95%CI). Finally, we included 13 papers in this study. The pooled prevalence rate of Covid-19 was 2.12% (95%CI: 0.75-5.98). Fever, cough, fatigue and anorexia were the most common symptoms with a rate of 72.72% (95% CI: 57.3 - 92.29), 66.99% (95% CI: 49.08-91.42), 61.58% (95% CI: 46.69-81.21) and 52.55% (95% CI: 35.09-78.68), respectively. The pooled rates were 39.89% (95% CI: 27.09-58.73) for hospitalisation, 4.7% (95% CI: 1.56-14.16) for ICU admission and 25.1% (95%CI: 16.37-38.49) for mortality. On further comparison of hospitalisation and mortality rates among Covid-19 patients with and without PD, there were no significant differences. In conclusion, the prevalence and prognosis of Covid-19 patients seem comparable in patients with PD and those without it. The increased hospitalisation and mortality may be attributed to old age and co-morbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 89: 90-92, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may be at increased risk of Covid-19 mortality due to the nature of their disease or underlying conditions. METHOD: The information of 12,909 Covid-19 patients who were hospitalized during the last eleven months were collected from the data depository of two referral university hospitals. Eighty-seven of these patients were diagnosed with PD, and thirty-one of these PD patients died because of Covid-19. 2132 other deaths occurred in these centers, related to Covid-19 of non-PD patients. Fisher exact test, Chi-square test, and Principle component analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mortality among PD patients and other hospitalized patients was 35.6% and 19.8%, respectively, and the difference between the mortality of these two groups was found to be statistically significant (p-value<0.01). The mean age of PD patients who passed away was 77.06 ± 7.46, and it was not significantly different from that of alive PD patients (p-value>0.05). Alzheimer's disease as an underlying condition was more frequent in deceased PD patients in comparison to survived PD patients, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (p-value<0.01). CONCLUSION: PD patients possess a higher rate of Covid-19 mortality in comparison with other patients hospitalized for Covid-19. PD pathophysiology, advanced age, underlying conditions, and health systems' efficacy may play an essential role in such an outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Dementia/complications , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/mortality , Principal Component Analysis , Survival Analysis
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