Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Infect Genet Evol ; 89: 104733, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386288

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A recent study on the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the host's transcriptome indicated the perturbation of several pathways associated with neurodegeneration, including but not limited to Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine overlapping pathways between iPD vs. Controls and those associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: Gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) were performed on gene expression data from tissues donated by idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (iPD). These included dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), substantia nigra (SN), whole blood (WB) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples (PBMC). Enriched pathways detected by GSEA results were subsequently compared to (a) those retrieved by two independently constructed SARS-CoV-2 - host interactomes, as well as (b) previously published pathway data. For all analyses, a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Analysis of iPD data revealed multiple immune response and viral parasitism -related pathways (FDR < 0.05). Head-to-head comparisons as well as confirmatory analyses revealed several pathways and gene ontology (GO) terms overlapping between iPD tissues and SARS-CoV-2 induced transcriptomic changes: "Parkinson's Disease" and "Huntington's Disease" (overlapping in DMNV, ION, SN, and WB; FDR < 0.05), "NAFLD" (overlapping in DMNV, SN, PBMC and WB; FDR < 0.05), mRNA surveillance and proteostasis pathways (All datasets; FDR < 0.5), among others. CONCLUSION: The overlap noted in this comparative transcriptomic study outlines the potential contribution of human coronaviruses in the pathogenesis of iPD. Furthermore, given SARS-CoV-2's neuroinvasive potential, closer scrutiny is warranted towards its contribution in the long-term development of neurodegenerative disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Parkinson Disease/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcriptome , Case-Control Studies , Gene Expression , Gene Ontology , Humans , Parkinson Disease/genetics
2.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(9): 837-839, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367091

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 might have an impact on patients with Parkinson disease because of the neuroinvasive potential. Herein, we report the case of a patient with Parkinson disease who developed severe and prolonged oropharyngeal dysphagia after a coronavirus disease 2019 infection. A 73-yr-old male patient with Parkinson disease was diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 and admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Before hospitalization, he was assessed at Hoehn and Yahr stage 4 and showed no symptoms of dysphagia. After admission, the patient gradually recovered; however, he was fed through a nasogastric tube. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed a severe oropharyngeal dysphagia with a severely delayed oral phase. Therefore, he underwent percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertion. After discharge, although he received swallowing therapy for 4 mos, he still had severe dysphagia, which made him dependent on enteral feeding. We speculate that the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 on dopaminergic and nondopaminergic mechanisms could lead to the development of dysphagia in this patient. The present case suggests that clinicians must have a high index of suspicion without dismissing the possibility of dysphagia and subsequent aspiration pneumonia in coronavirus disease 2019 patients with Parkinson disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Deglutition Disorders/virology , Parkinson Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Deglutition , Deglutition Disorders/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Parkinson Disease/virology
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295859

ABSTRACT

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative motor disorder characterized by selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of the midbrain, depletion of dopamine (DA), and impaired nigrostriatal pathway. The pathological hallmark of PD includes the aggregation and accumulation α-synuclein (α-SYN). Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of PD are still unknown, the activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), mainly TLR4 and subsequent neuroinflammatory immune response, seem to play a significant role. Mounting evidence suggests that viral infection can concur with the precipitation of PD or parkinsonism. The recently identified coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of ongoing pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), responsible for 160 million cases that led to the death of more than three million individuals worldwide. Studies have reported that many patients with COVID-19 display several neurological manifestations, including acute cerebrovascular diseases, conscious disturbance, and typical motor and non-motor symptoms accompanying PD. In this review, the neurotropic potential of SARS-CoV-2 and its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of PD are discussed. Specifically, the involvement of the TLR4 signaling pathway in mediating the virus entry, as well as the massive immune and inflammatory response in COVID-19 patients is explored. The binding of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein to TLR4 and the possible interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and α-SYN as contributing factors to neuronal death are also considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , Parkinson Disease/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Parkinson Disease/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/physiology
4.
Viruses ; 13(5)2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227070

ABSTRACT

Extensive extrapulmonary damages in a dozen of organs/systems, including the central nervous system (CNS), are reported in patients of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Three cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been reported as a direct consequence of COVID-19. In spite of the scarce data for establishing a definitive link between COVID-19 and PD, some hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cases reported. They, however, do not fit well with the clinical findings reported for COVID-19 patients, in general, and for the PD cases reported, in particular. Given the importance of this potential connection, we present here a molecular-level mechanistic hypothesis that explains well these findings and will serve to explore the potential CNS damage in COVID-19 patients. The model explaining the cascade effects from COVID-19 to CNS is developed by using bioinformatic tools. It includes the post-translational modification of host proteins in the lungs by viral proteins, the transport of modified host proteins via exosomes out the lungs, and the disruption of protein-protein interaction in the CNS by these modified host proteins. Our hypothesis is supported by finding 44 proteins significantly expressed in the CNS which are associated with PD and whose interactions can be perturbed by 24 host proteins significantly expressed in the lungs. These 24 perturbators are found to interact with viral proteins and to form part of the cargoes of exosomes in human tissues. The joint set of perturbators and PD-vulnerable proteins form a tightly connected network with significantly more connections than expected by selecting a random cluster of proteins of similar size from the human proteome. The molecular-level mechanistic hypothesis presented here provides several routes for the cascading of effects from the lungs of COVID-19 patients to PD. In particular, the disruption of autophagy/ubiquitination processes appears as an important mechanism that triggers the generation of large amounts of exosomes containing perturbators in their cargo, which would insult several PD-vulnerable proteins, potentially triggering Parkinsonism in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Parkinson Disease, Secondary/etiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Central Nervous System/virology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Models, Theoretical , Parkinson Disease/etiology , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , Parkinson Disease/virology , Parkinson Disease, Secondary/metabolism , Parkinson Disease, Secondary/virology , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Proteins/metabolism
5.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154291

ABSTRACT

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, intraneuronal deposition of misfolded proteins known as Lewy bodies, and chronic neuroinflammation. PD can arise from monogenic mutations, but in most cases, the etiology is unclear. Viral infection is gaining increasing attentions as a trigger of PD. In this study, we investigated whether the PD-causative 620 aspartate (D) to asparagine (N) mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 35 ortholog (Vps35) precipitated herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. We observed that ectopic expression of Vps35 significantly reduced the proliferation and release of HSV-1 virions; the D620N mutation rendered Vps35 a partial loss of such inhibitory effects. Tetherin is a host cell protein capable of restricting the spread of encapsulated viruses including HSV-1 and SARS-Cov-2, both of which are implicated in the development of parkinsonism. Compared with cells overexpressing wildtype Vps35, cells expressing mutant Vps35 with D620N had less Tetherin on cell surfaces. Real-time and static cell imaging revealed that Tetherin recycled through Vps35-positive endosomes. Expression of Vps35 with D620N reduced endosomal dynamics and frequency of motile Tetherin-containing vesicles, a sign of defective production of recycling carriers. Our study suggests that the D620N mutation in Vps35 hinders Tetherin trafficking to cell surfaces and facilitates virus spread.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2/metabolism , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , Parkinson Disease/virology , Simplexvirus/metabolism , Vesicular Transport Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Endosomes/metabolism , Humans , Mutation , Parkinson Disease/genetics , Protein Transport/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Simplexvirus/pathogenicity , Transfection , Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication/genetics
6.
Arch Virol ; 166(3): 733-753, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064515

ABSTRACT

The chronic dysfunction of neuronal cells, both central and peripheral, a characteristic of neurological disorders, may be caused by irreversible damage and cell death. In 2016, more than 276 million cases of neurological disorders were reported worldwide. Moreover, neurological disorders are the second leading cause of death. Generally, the etiology of neurological diseases is not fully understood. Recent studies have related the onset of neurological disorders to viral infections, which may cause neurological symptoms or lead to immune responses that trigger these pathological signs. Currently, this relationship is mostly based on epidemiological data on infections and seroprevalence of patients who present with neurological disorders. The number of studies aiming to elucidate the mechanism of action by which viral infections may directly or indirectly contribute to the development of neurological disorders has been increasing over the years but these studies are still scarce. Comprehending the pathogenesis of these diseases and exploring novel theories may favor the development of new strategies for diagnosis and therapy in the future. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to review the main pieces of evidence for the relationship between viral infection and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. Viruses belonging to the families Herpesviridae, Orthomyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Retroviridae have been reported to be involved in one or more of these conditions. Also, neurological symptoms and the future impact of infection with SARS-CoV-2, a member of the family Coronaviridae that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic that started in late 2019, are reported and discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Viral Tropism/physiology , Alzheimer Disease/virology , COVID-19/virology , Epilepsy/virology , Flaviviridae/metabolism , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Herpesviridae/metabolism , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/virology , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae/metabolism , Parkinson Disease/virology , Retroviridae/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
7.
Neurol Sci ; 42(3): 811-816, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028115

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has had a dramatic impact on the healthcare system due to the rapid, worldwide spread of the virus, highlighting several considerations on the best management of infected patients and also potential risks and prognostic factors in patients with pre-existing chronic diseases exposed to the virus. Neurodegenerative disorders are known to be chronic, disabling diseases that imply a higher vulnerability to infections, and for this reason, it has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 infection may have a worse course in these patients. In the present study, we report our experience with 12 patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) who became infected with SARS-Cov-2 due to a COVID-19 outbreak in a care residency, and thus hospitalised in our COVID hospital. Most of the PD patients had a long disease duration and multiple comorbidities even though SARS-CoV-2 manifestations were mild, and none required intensive care. Despite lung conditions, most of our PD patients had mild symptoms: 7 patients were clinically asymptomatic (58.3%); 3 patients had fever, cough, and myalgia (25%) and 2 patients had dyspnoea (16%) that needed high-flow oxygen therapy. Few complications related to PD were seen. All patients were discharged after a mean hospitalisation period of 30 days. Mortality rate during hospitalisation was zero. Our findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection does not have a poor prognosis in patients with PD. More extensive data and evaluations, however, are needed to confirm our data, and caution is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Parkinson Disease/virology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Rehabilitation Centers , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e930340, 2020 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979224

ABSTRACT

Alterations in complex behavioral patterns during the extended period of the COVID-19 pandemic are predicted to promote a variety of psychiatric disease symptoms due to enforced social isolation and self-quarantine. Accordingly, multifaceted mental health problems will continue to increase, thereby creating a challenge for society and the health care system in general. Recent studies show that COVID-19 can directly or indirectly influence the central nervous system, potentially causing neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Thus, chronic COVID-19-related disease processes have the potential to cause serious mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Importantly, mental health problems can foster systemic changes in functionally-linked neuroendocrine conditions that heighten a person's susceptibility to COVID-19 infection. These altered defense mechanisms may include compromised "self-control" and "self-care", as well as a "lack of insight" into the danger posed by the virus. These consequences may have serious social impacts on the future of COVID-19 survivors. Compounding the functionally related issues of altered mental health parameters and viral susceptibility are the potential effects of compromised immunity on the establishment of functional herd immunity. Within this context, mental health takes on added importance, particularly in terms of the need to increase support for mental health research and community-based initiatives. Thus, COVID-19 infections continue to reveal mental health targets, a process we must now be prepared to deal with.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Survivors/psychology , Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Alzheimer Disease/virology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Disease Susceptibility/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/prevention & control , Parkinson Disease/virology , Physical Distancing , Self Care/psychology , Self-Control/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology
10.
Trends Neurosci ; 43(12): 931-933, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912644

ABSTRACT

Three recent case reports (by Méndez-Guerrero et al.,Cohen et al., and Faber et al.) describe the development of acute parkinsonism following coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We discuss possible underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, and whether COVID-19 might be associated with elevated long-term risk of Parkinson's disease (PD).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Parkinson Disease/virology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 10(4): 1365-1377, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To rapidly identify areas of need and improve care in people with PD during the COVID-19 pandemic, we deployed a survey to assess COVID-19 symptoms and the pandemic's effect among those with and without COVID-19. METHODS: People with and without PD participating in the online study Fox Insight (FI) were invited to complete a survey between April 23 and May 23, 2020. Among people reporting COVID-19 diagnoses, we compared symptoms and outcomes in people with and without PD. Among people not reporting COVID-19, we assessed access to healthcare and services and PD symptoms. RESULTS: 7,209/9,762 active FI users responded (approximately 74% response rate), 5,429 people with PD and 1,452 without PD. COVID-19 diagnoses were reported by 51 people with and 26 without PD. Complications were more frequent in people with longer PD duration. People with PD and COVID-19 experienced new or worsening motor (63%) and nonmotor (75%) symptoms. People with PD not diagnosed with COVID-19 reported disrupted medical care (64%), exercise (21%), and social activities (57%), and worsened motor (43%) and non-motor (52%) symptoms. Disruptions were more common for those living alone, with lower income and non-White race. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with wide-ranging effects on people with PD, and certain groups may be at particular risk. FI provides a rapid, patient-centered means to assess these effects and identify needs that can be used to improve the health of people with PD.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
J Neurol ; 268(4): 1179-1187, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: If Parkinson's Disease (PD) may represent a risk factor for Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is debated and there are few data on the direct and indirect effects of this pandemic in PD patients. OBJECTIVE: In the current study we evaluated the prevalence, mortality and case-fatality of COVID-19 in a PD cohort, also exploring possible risk factors. We also aimed to investigate the effect of lockdown on motor/non-motor symptoms in PD patients as well as their acceptability/accessibility to telemedicine. METHOD: A case-controlled survey about COVID-19 and other clinical features in PD patients living in Tuscany was conducted. In non-COVID-19 PD patients motor/non-motor symptoms subjective worsening during the lockdown as well as feasibility of telemedicine were explored. RESULTS: Out of 740 PD patients interviewed, 7 (0.9%) were affected by COVID-19, with 0.13% mortality and 14% case-fatality. COVID-19 PD patients presented a higher presence of hypertension (p < 0.001) and diabetes (p = 0.049) compared to non-COVID-19. In non-COVID-19 PD population (n = 733) about 70% did not experience a subjective worsening of motor symptoms or mood, anxiety or insomnia. In our population 75.2% of patients was favorable to use technology to perform scheduled visits, however facilities for telemedicine were available only for 51.2% of cases. CONCLUSION: A higher prevalence of COVID-19 respect to prevalence in Tuscany and Italy was found in the PD population. Hypertension and diabetes, as for general population, were identified as risk factors for COVID-19 in PD. PD patients did not experience a subjective worsening of symptoms during lockdown period and they were also favorable to telemedicine, albeit we reported a reduced availability to perform it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/virology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
14.
Neurol India ; 68(4): 792-795, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732744

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled countries to impose lockdowns to curb the spread. As a result of the lockdown and need for health care services to cater to acute diseases on priority, patients with chronic illnesses such as Parkinson's disease (PD) may be facing several difficulties. AIMS: This study aimed to explore the effects of prolongation of lockdown on patients with PD by evaluating possible problems faced during a lockdown and worsening of symptoms if any. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred patients with PD and their caregivers were contacted. RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in problems faced due to this pandemic, specifically, the inability to access health care, and difficulty procuring medication. Patients also reported worsening of motor symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings highlight the need for health care systems to consider a plan of action for chronic neurological diseases like PD, which are worsening in the absence of regular hospital visits.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Caregivers , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Mov Disord ; 35(8): 1287-1292, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734140

ABSTRACT

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been poorly characterized so far. Of 141 PD patients resident in Lombardy, we found 12 COVID-19 cases (8.5%), whose mean age and disease duration (65.5 and 6.3 years, respectively) were similar to controls. Changes in clinical features in the period January 2020 to April 2020 were compared with those of 36 PD controls matched for sex, age, and disease duration using the clinical impression of severity index for PD, the Movement Disorders Society Unified PD Rating Scale Parts II and IV, and the nonmotor symptoms scale. Motor and nonmotor symptoms significantly worsened in the COVID-19 group, requiring therapy adjustment in one third of cases. Clinical deterioration was explained by both infection-related mechanisms and impaired pharmacokinetics of dopaminergic therapy. Urinary issues and fatigue were the most prominent nonmotor issues. Cognitive functions were marginally involved, whereas none experienced autonomic failure. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Cognition/physiology , Cognition Disorders/virology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/virology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL