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2.
J Clin Pathol ; 73(11): 706-712, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662497

ABSTRACT

The 2020 COVID-19 crisis has had and will have many implications for healthcare, including pathology. Rising number of infections create staffing shortages and other hospital departments might require pathology employees to fill more urgent positions. Furthermore, lockdown measures and social distancing cause many people to work from home. During this crisis, it became clearer than ever what an asset digital diagnostics is to keep pathologists, residents, molecular biologists and pathology assistants engaged in the diagnostic process, allowing social distancing and a 'need to be there' on-the-premises policy, while working effectively from home. This paper provides an overview of our way of working during the 2020 COVID-19 crisis with emphasis on the virtues of digital pathology.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telepathology/methods , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Interprofessional Relations , Pathology, Clinical/instrumentation , Pathology, Clinical/organization & administration , Telepathology/instrumentation , Telepathology/organization & administration
3.
Adv Anat Pathol ; 27(6): 355-362, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638434

ABSTRACT

Pathology Autopsy and Mortuary Services have been front and center in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Co-V-2) pandemic. The sheer number of fatalities from the pandemic have been unlike any other in recent memory and needed the rapid creation of new protocols and paradigms to manage the situation. This required rapidly escalating mortuary capacity to manage the increased fatalities from the pandemic with the establishment of lines of communication and networking with governmental entities, institution of new policies for patient flow, and implementation of worker infection control and well-being plans. Autopsies also assumed a crucial role, both to provide insight into the pathomechanisms of a novel disease and to allow tissue retrieval necessary to power research directed towards finding a vaccine. We here outline the plan adopted by the Yale Autopsy and Mortuary Services, in alignment with the institutional mission of high-quality patient care, education, research and health care worker safety and well-being, as the Corona Virus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic surged in Connecticut. In the early response phase, ensuring sufficient mortuary capacity necessarily took center stage. As we enter the recovery and plateau phase of the pandemic, setting up a process for a rapid and safe autopsy, that will meet educational and research needs while ensuring the safety of our workforce is being implemented.


Subject(s)
Autopsy/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Emergencies , Mortuary Practice/methods , Pandemics , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Autopsy/standards , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Mortuary Practice/standards , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health/standards , Pathology, Clinical/standards , Public Health/methods , Public Health/standards
4.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 144(11): 1311-1320, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608258

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic is placing unparalleled burdens on regional and institutional resources in medical facilities across the globe. This disruption is causing unprecedented downstream effects to traditionally established channels of patient care delivery, including those of essential anatomic pathology services. With Washington state being the initial North American COVID-19 epicenter, the University of Washington in Seattle has been at the forefront of conceptualizing and implementing innovative solutions in order to provide uninterrupted quality patient care amidst this growing crisis. OBJECTIVE.­: To conduct a rapid validation study assessing our ability to reliably provide diagnostic neuropathology services via a whole slide imaging (WSI) platform as part of our departmental COVID-19 planning response. DESIGN.­: This retrospective study assessed diagnostic concordance of neuropathologic diagnoses rendered via WSI as compared to those originally established via traditional histopathology in a cohort of 30 cases encompassing a broad range of neurosurgical and neuromuscular entities. This study included the digitalization of 93 slide preparations, which were independently examined by groups of board-certified neuropathologists and neuropathology fellows. RESULTS.­: There were no major or minor diagnostic discrepancies identified in either the attending neuropathologist or neuropathology trainee groups for either the neurosurgical or neuromuscular case cohorts. CONCLUSIONS.­: Our study demonstrates that accuracy of neuropathologic diagnoses and interpretation of ancillary preparations via WSI are not inferior to those generated via traditional microscopy. This study provides a framework for rapid subspecialty validation and deployment of WSI for diagnostic purposes during a pandemic event.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Neuropathology/methods , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Telepathology/methods , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Global Health , Humans , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods , Microscopy/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Universities , Washington
5.
J Histotechnol ; 43(2): 102-104, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2831

ABSTRACT

The 2019 Coronavirus epidemic, provisionally called 2019-nCoV, was first identified in Wuhan, China, in persons exposed to a seafood or wet market. There is an international push to contain the virus and prevent its spread. It is feasible that potentially infectious samples may be received in histopathology laboratories for diagnosis. This technical note presents disinfection procedures and histotechnology processes that should alleviate the risk of infection to laboratory staff. Using data obtained from similar coronaviruses, e.g. severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), experts are confident that 70% ethanol and 0.1% sodium hypochlorite should inactivate the virus. Formalin fixation and heating samples to 56oC, as used in routine tissue processing, were found to inactivate several coronaviruses and it is believed that 2019-nCoV would be similarly affected.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Containment of Biohazards/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Disinfection/methods , Pandemics , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Containment of Biohazards/standards , Disinfection/standards , Histological Techniques/standards , Humans , Laboratories/standards , Pathology, Clinical/standards
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