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2.
J Commun Healthc ; 16(1): 62-74, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guided by the 5C (confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility) model of vaccination behavior, we examine the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (i.e. attitudes and intentions toward COVID-19 vaccination) among Black Americans, a group disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. METHOD: We conducted a national survey of Black Americans (N = 1,497) in February/March 2021. RESULTS: We found that, among the five psychological antecedents, three (confidence, calculation - or extensive information searching, and collective responsibility) significantly predicted attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination and had indirect effects on vaccination intentions through vaccination attitudes. Two antecedents (confidence and collective responsibility) also directly predicted vaccination intentions. Our analysis suggests that a partially mediated model produced better fit than a fully mediated model. CONCLUSIONS: Developing culturally tailored interventions for Black Americans that build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines, highlight collective responsibility, and attend to Black Americans' information sources is key to boosting Black Americans' COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Future research is needed to understand how historical and ongoing racism affects the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among Black Americans.


Subject(s)
Black or African American , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Humans , Communication , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Vaccination/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263469

ABSTRACT

A low help-seeking intention for depression is an important reason for the low number of women with perinatal depression who have sought professional help. However, evidence of help-seeking intentions for depression is still lacking in Chinese perinatal women. We aimed to investigate the help-seeking intention for depression and its associated factors among Chinese perinatal women. Participants were recruited from three comprehensive hospitals in Changsha. A total of 874 perinatal women were included in the study. The score for the help-seeking intention for depression in Chinese perinatal women was 3.65 ± 0.79, with about half of participants (58.3%) reporting that they were "likely" and "strongly likely" to seek professional help if they suffered from depression during the perinatal period. Favorable help-seeking attitudes and sufficient knowledge of mental illness help-seeking resources were positively associated with help-seeking intentions for depression. However, self-stigma decreased the help-seeking intention for depression. Chinese perinatal women had relatively positive help-seeking intentions for depression. Reducing the stigma of mental illness and help-seeking, enhancing mental health literacy, and improving attitudes toward professional psychological help-seeking of perinatal women may be the potential key components of interventions to encourage perinatal women to actively seek professional psychological help.


Subject(s)
Help-Seeking Behavior , Intention , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , East Asian People , Mental Health , Social Stigma , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282773

ABSTRACT

Vaccine uptake is considered as one of the most effective methods of defending against COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). However, many young adults are hesitant regarding COVID-19 vaccines, and they actually play an important role in virus transmission. Based on a multi-theory model, this study aims to explore the influencing factors related to COVID-19 vaccine willingness among young adults in China. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the factors that would motivate young adults with vaccine hesitancy to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interview data with topic modeling as a complementarity method. After comparing the differences and similarities of results generated by thematic analysis and topic modeling, this study ultimately identified ten key factors related to COVID-19 vaccination intention, including the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, application range of vaccine, etc. This study combined thematic analysis with machine learning and provided a comprehensive and nuanced picture of facilitating factors for COVID-19 vaccine uptake among Chinese young adults. Results may be taken as potential themes for authorities and public health workers in vaccination campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Humans , Young Adult , Asian People , China , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccination/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
5.
Br J Gen Pract ; 72(725): e849-e856, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identifying what prompts or hinders women's help-seeking behaviour is essential to ensure timely diagnosis and management of gynaecological cancers. AIM: To understand the factors that influence the help- seeking behaviour of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review and narrative synthesis of studies from high-income settings worldwide. METHOD: Five databases were searched for studies, of any design, that presented factors related to the help-seeking behaviour of women diagnosed with a gynaecological cancer. Data from the articles were extracted and presented using narrative synthesis, which was both inductive and deductive. The COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation, behaviour) model of behaviour change was used as a framework. RESULTS: In total, 21 studies were included in the review. Inductive synthesis presented three main themes of factors related to the help-seeking behaviour of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer: patient factors, such as knowledge of symptoms; emotional factors, including previous healthcare experience, embarrassment, and trust; and practical factors, including time and resources. Deductive synthesis demonstrated that capability (namely, symptom knowledge), opportunity (having the required time and overcoming the cultural taboos surrounding gynaecological symptoms), and motivation (believing that seeking help is beneficial) are all required to initiate help-seeking behaviour. CONCLUSION: Although it is a journey of defined steps, the help- seeking behaviour of women with symptoms diagnosed with gynaecological cancer is influenced by personal and societal factors. Interventions to improve help seeking will need to address the specific identified factors, as well as capability, opportunity, and motivation.


Subject(s)
Genital Neoplasms, Female , Help-Seeking Behavior , Female , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Motivation
6.
Acta Neuropsychiatr ; 33(5): 273-276, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275121

ABSTRACT

Patients with mental illness are at an increased risk of COVID-19 infection, morbidity, and mortality, and prioritisation of this group for COVID-19 vaccination programmes has therefore been suggested. Vaccine uptake may, however, be compromised by vaccine hesitancy amongst patients with mental illness, posing a critical public health issue. We conducted two surveys to provide weighted estimates of vaccine willingness amongst patients with mental illness and the general population of Denmark. Vaccine willingness was high in both groups, but slightly lower amongst patients with mental illness (84.8%), compared with the general population (89.5%) (p < .001). Based on these findings, vaccine hesitancy does not appear to be a major barrier for vaccine uptake amongst patients with mental illness in Denmark, but may be so in other countries with lower general vaccine willingness. Replication of the present study in other countries is strongly warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/immunology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Case-Control Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/mortality , Mental Disorders/virology , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Am J Prev Med ; 64(5): 734-741, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2233982

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Focusing on subpopulations that express the intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccination but are unvaccinated may improve the yield of COVID-19 vaccination efforts. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of 789,658 U.S. adults aged ≥18 years participated in the National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module from May 2021 to April 2022. The survey assessed respondents' COVID-19 vaccination status and intent by demographic characteristics (age, urbanicity, educational attainment, region, insurance, income, and race/ethnicity). This study compared composition and within-group estimates of those who responded that they definitely or probably will get vaccinated or are unsure (moveable middle) from the first and last month of data collection. RESULTS: Because vaccination uptake increased over the study period, the moveable middle declined among persons aged ≥18 years. Adults aged 18-39 years and suburban residents comprised most of the moveable middle in April 2022. Groups with the largest moveable middles in April 2022 included persons with no insurance (10%), those aged 18-29 years (8%), and those with incomes below poverty (8%), followed by non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (7%), non-Hispanic multiple or other race (6%), non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons (6%), non-Hispanic Black or African American persons (6%), those with below high school education (6%), those with high school education (5%), and those aged 30-39 years (5%). CONCLUSIONS: A sizable percentage of adults open to receiving COVID-19 vaccination remain in several demographic groups. Emphasizing engagement of persons who are unvaccinated in some racial/ethnic groups, aged 18-39 years, without health insurance, or with lower income may reach more persons open to vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data
8.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 58(5): 1417-1426, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2219839

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the status of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination with inactivated vaccines BBIBP-CorV and CoronaVac in Chinese children aged 3-7 years with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and explore factors influencing vaccination and reasons for nonvaccination. METHODS: This cross-sectional study involving parents of 397 BPD children aged 3-7 years was conducted through WeChat or follow-up telephone interviews using a standardized questionnaire form. Factors influencing COVID-19 vaccination were explored by using modified Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The overall COVID-19 vaccination rate was 69.0% (95% confidence interval: 64.3%-73.4%). COVID-19 vaccination was less likely to be accepted in children whose mothers had a relatively high educational background (university and above), who lived in urban areas and had a low birth weight (<1 kg), a history of hospitalization for lung diseases in the past 12 months, and intellectual disability. Conversely, kindergarten students and children from families with an annual income of >300,000 CNY ( ≈ $\approx $ 41,400 USD) were more likely to accept vaccination. Adverse reactions occurred in 13/274 children (4.7%) within 10 days after vaccination. With respect to reasons of not accepting COVID-19 vaccination, 95 parents (77.2%) worried about the adverse reactions, and 17 parents (13.8%) refused vaccination on the excuse of not being convenient to go to the vaccination station or not knowing where to get the vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 vaccination rate in BPD children aged 3-7 years needs to be further improved in China. Continuous efforts are required to monitor postvaccination adverse reactions in BPD children, and make vaccination more convenient and accessible.


Subject(s)
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , East Asian People , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Child , Humans , Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , East Asian People/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Child, Preschool , Parents/psychology , Health Services Accessibility
9.
Soc Sci Med ; 318: 115648, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2165863

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Help-seeking can convert an individual's bonding social capital into social support, which has been shown to buffer the impact of psychological distress. The younger generation (individuals aged 15-35 years) have been the least likely to actively seek help despite facing a rising burden of mental health problems. COVID-19 pandemic restrictions may have altered their help-seeking behaviors, but the extent of such shift remains little understood, particularly in Asian contexts. OBJECTIVE: To understand how the younger generation's patterns of help-seeking (activation of different combinations of support sources) have shifted in pandemic times, who have experienced the shift, and what explanatory factors are involved. METHODS: Data were obtained from two waves (2019, 2020) of online survey responses by 438 community-dwelling younger generation people in Hong Kong, recruited through the authors' affiliated institutions and territory-wide community outreach organizations. Latent class analysis was conducted on participants' self-reported help-seeking behaviors in each survey wave. Constituents' characteristics in each latent class were examined, and between-wave changes in individuals' class membership were identified. Logistic regressions identified explanatory factors that significantly explained the changes. RESULTS: Three consistent patterns of help-seeking were identified in both survey waves. A major shift was observed for individuals with poorer mental health histories who faced moderate distress. They relied on their family, friends, and partner pre-pandemic, but no longer activated these supports during the pandemic. Posting status updates on social media, along with various communication habits and sociodemographic factors that differed by age group, were associated with this shift. CONCLUSIONS: Shifts in the younger generation's patterns of help-seeking may be an early warning signal to invest additional resources in facilitating help-seeking among the younger generation. Findings also serve as a reminder that public health restrictions may have inadvertent mental health implications that should be considered in future scenarios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Pandemics , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Mental Health
10.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 41: 286-294, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031124

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite the high prevalence of mental health disorders, professional help seeking was often unsought, worsening impairments in overall functioning among those who experienced them. AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the online HOPE intervention on help-seeking attitudes and intentions among young adults 18 to 24 years old in a University in Singapore. The study also described the process evaluation of the online HOPE intervention. METHOD: The study adopted a parallel two arms RCT. Outcome measurements measured at baseline, post-test and two-month follow-up were (1) recognition of depression, (2) barriers of help-seeking, (3) help-seeking intentions (4) attitudes about interventions, help sources, medications and (5) participants' perceptions about the intervention. RESULTS: At post-test, intervention group had significantly lower acknowledgement of depression as stress. At two months, control group was significantly more concerned about side effects of medications. There were no significant differences in all barriers of help-seeking between groups, pre and post intervention. The intervention group had greater acknowledgement of antidepressants, tranquilisers and antipsychotics. Thematic analysis revealed four main themes. DISCUSSION: There was high baseline recognition of depression. Improvements in help-seeking intentions were partially attributed to decreased help-seeking barriers. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: The online HOPE intervention could be promptly implemented for young adults to enhance the identification of mental health disorders, early help-seeking and recovery. Nurses played an important role in patient education, and online interventions are especially crucial during this Covid period which mandated social distancing. [NCT04266119].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet-Based Intervention , Young Adult , Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Intention , Singapore , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 595, 2022 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mental health of healthcare professionals is reaching a breaking point, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated current mental health issues to unprecedented levels. Whilst some research has been carried out on the barriers that doctors face when seeking mental health help, there is little research into factors which may facilitate seeking help. We aimed to expand the research base on factors which act as barriers to seeking help, as well as gain insight into facilitators of help-seeking behaviour for mental health in NHS doctors. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature review which identified the barriers and facilitators to seeking help for mental health in healthcare professionals. Following this, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 NHS doctors about their experiences with mental health services. Finally, through thematic analysis, key themes were synthesised from the data. RESULTS: Our systematic literature review uncovered barriers and facilitators from pre-existing literature, of which the barriers were: preventing actions, self-stigma, perceived stigma, costs of seeking treatment, lack of awareness and availability of support, negative career implications, confidentiality concerns and a lack of time to seek help. Only two facilitators were found in the pre-existing literature, a positive work environment and availability of support services. Our qualitative study uncovered additional barriers and facilitators, of which the identified barriers include: a negative workplace culture, lack of openness, expectations of doctors and generational differences. The facilitators include positive views about mental health, external confidential service, better patient outcomes, protected time, greater awareness and accessibility, open culture and supportive supervisors. CONCLUSION: Our study began by identifying barriers and facilitators to seeking mental health help in healthcare workers, through our systematic literature review. We contributed to these findings by identifying themes in qualitative data.. Our findings are crucial to identify factors preventing NHS doctors from seeking help for their mental health so that more can be done on a national, trust-wide and personal level to overcome these barriers. Likewise, further research into facilitators is key to encourage doctors to reach out and seek help for their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , State Medicine
12.
BMC Prim Care ; 23(1): 119, 2022 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. Prompt patient help-seeking for signs and symptoms suggestive of lung cancer is crucial for early referral, diagnosis, and survivorship. However, individuals with potential lung cancer symptoms tend to delay help-seeking. This qualitative study explored perceived barriers to patient help-seeking and strategies to enhance help-seeking for lung cancer warning signs and symptoms from the perspective of primary healthcare professionals. METHODS: Semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 36 primary healthcare professionals. Data were collected via videoconferencing. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The following two themes were created from the data: (i) perceived barriers to patient help-seeking for signs and symptoms of concern and (ii) facilitating early patient presentation for signs and symptoms of concern. Some participants believed that the high cost of a general practitioner visit, long waiting times, and previous bad experiences with the healthcare system would deter patients from seeking help for symptoms of lung cancer. Perceived patient-related barriers to help-seeking related to the different emotions associated with a potential cancer diagnosis as well as stigma, embarrassment, and guilt felt by smokers. Sociodemographic factors such as drug use, homelessness, living in rural areas, and being male and older were also perceived to impede patient help-seeking. The negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer help-seeking also featured strongly. Participants recommended several strategies to enable patients to seek help for symptoms of concern including targeted educational campaigns focussing on symptoms (e.g., cough) rather than behaviours (e.g., smoking), accessible and free health services, and using patients' support networks. CONCLUSIONS: Patient-related and healthcare system-related barriers to help-seeking for lung cancer warning signs and symptoms include cost of healthcare, cancer fear, and various sociodemographic factors. Participants suggested that increased awareness and early patient help-seeking for symptoms of concern could be achieved through targeted patient education, national campaigns, the use of community support networks, and free and accessible targeted screening services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Male , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Primary Health Care
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911337

ABSTRACT

Medical students are at increased risk for psychological morbidity but the majority of those with mental health problems do not seek professional care. We aimed to uncover the viewpoints of medical students regarding barriers and facilitators to using university mental health services and their attitudes and preferences towards online counselling. Four semi-structured focus groups were conducted (n = 26, mean age = 21.8, ±1.88, 73% males). After reaching data saturation, interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and content-analysed by two independent coders. Intrapersonal barriers emerged to be perceived low risk, excessive self-reliance, lack of belief in the effectiveness of service, lack of openness. Interpersonal factors were the following: assumed long waiting list, insufficient provision of service information, fear of exposure, and not being familiar with the counsellor and the process. Extrapersonal barriers such as insurance problems, the number of available sessions, adverse sociocultural attitudes, fear of stigmatisation were identified. Students suggested that the university should provide psychoeducation and routine screening, apply social marketing and stigma reduction campaigns, improve information flow, and offer not only personal but also online video counselling to target removing these barriers. The results provide a reference for the redesign of mental health services to facilitate their access by students. Implications and limitations are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Schools, Medical , Social Stigma , Students, Medical/psychology
14.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2074716, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895722

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy is one of the top ten global health threats and the first threat to fighting COVID-19 through vaccination. With the increasing level of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy amidst the rising level of confirmed cases and death tolls, this paper provides rapid systematic literature reviews on the measurement of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, key determinants and evidence-based strategies to prevent COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. The findings reveal three standard measures of vaccine hesitancy: optional response questions, Likert scale, and linear scale measurements. Factors such as sociodemographic/economic factors, occupational factors, knowledge on the vaccine, vaccine attributes, conspiracy belief and psychological factors are the major predictors of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Evidence-based findings identified measures such as effective education on the vaccine, clear and consistent communication to build public confidence and trust, health education on vaccination and its social benefit, outreach program and targeted messaging to minimize COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Vaccination Hesitancy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Vaccination/psychology
15.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2072144, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864929

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy against COVID-19 is prevalent. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination compliance among adults in Hong Kong. An online survey was conducted during an early stage of community-based COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Hong Kong. The questionnaire consisted of vaccine status, sociodemographic information, risk perception of being infected by COVID-19, and exposure to confirmed COVID cases, as well as items on sleep and mental health. The association between these variables and vaccine hesitancy was analyzed. Among the 883 participants (67.5% females, 54.5% aged 18-39), 30.6% had low vaccine hesitancy, 27.4% had high vaccine hesitancy, and 27.5% had vaccine rejection. The likelihood of having high vaccine hesitancy was higher among young (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-7.30) and middle-aged respondents (aOR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.07-5.47) than among old respondents. Moreover, those who were married (aOR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.29-0.88), had a full-time job (aOR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.29-0.88), and had a greater confidence in the government (aOR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.54-0.86) were less likely to exhibit vaccine hesitancy. Our findings showed that the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy and vaccine resistance were high. Policy makers need specific strategies to target those who may have a high risk of vaccine hesitancy and resistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
16.
Am J Audiol ; 30(2): 385-393, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805677

ABSTRACT

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted normal operations of health care services, broad sectors of the economy, and the ability to socialize freely. For those with tinnitus, such changes can be factors in exacerbating tinnitus. The purpose of this study was to determine tinnitus help-seeking behavior, which resources individuals utilized to cope during the pandemic, and what additional support is desired. Method An exploratory cross-sectional study design including 1,522 adults with tinnitus living in North America (Canada and the United States) was used. Data were collected through an online survey distributed by the American Tinnitus Association via e-mail. Free text from open-ended questions was analyzed using the automated content analysis. The responses to the structured questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics. Results Significantly less tinnitus support was sought during the pandemic, and very few respondents utilized tinnitus support networks during the pandemic at the time the survey was conducted. Nonetheless, seeking support during the pandemic was significantly associated with significantly less tinnitus distress. The most frequently utilized resources for coping during the pandemic were contacting family and friends, spending time outdoors or in nature, relaxation, and exercise. Such tools for coping were associated with significantly less tinnitus distress. The support requested and advice provided by participants to health care services had overlap. The main support needs related to managing tinnitus included addressing hearing loss, providing peer support, finding cures, and accessing trained and understanding health care providers to help. The advice for professionals related to tinnitus management included the need for cures, personalized support, addressing hearing loss, targeting the tinnitus percept, and providing more information about the condition. Conclusions These findings provide suggestions on how to better support those with tinnitus at a time when health care is undergoing rapid changes. Findings can be used by stakeholders, clinical practitioners, and tinnitus support services to devise ways to work more effectively together to improve access to patient-driven, suitable, accessible, and evidence-based support. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14558514.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Help-Seeking Behavior , Tinnitus/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Canada/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tinnitus/therapy , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263351, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793531

ABSTRACT

Pandemics, such as the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, represents a health threat to humans worldwide. During times of heightened health risks, the public's perceptions, and acceptance of evidence-based preventive measures, such as vaccines, is of high relevance. Moreover, people might seek other preventive remedies to protect themselves from getting infected (e.g., herbal remedies, nutritional supplements). A recent study on consumers' preference for naturalness showed that people put more weight on perceived naturalness of a preventive remedy compared to a curative one. This result was attributed to the increased focus on perceived effectiveness as opposed to perceived risk. This raises the question whether the current pandemic would shift people's perceptions from prevention to curing and thus, exhibit a preference for synthetic remedies because they are seen as more effective. The present online experiment (conducted in April 2021) investigated people's perceptions of vaccines and remedies within the context of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. A 2x2 between-subject design with type of remedy (natural vs. synthetic) and salience of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (high vs. low) was conducted in Switzerland in spring 2021 (N = 452). The data did not provide evidence of a curative mindset for preventive remedies, as the participants exhibited a clear preference for the natural remedy compared to the synthetic remedy. Our study stresses the importance of understanding people's mindsets on how to protect themselves from infection with a virus during an ongoing pandemic to tackle misinformation and vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Vaccination Hesitancy/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Communication , Consumer Behavior , Dissent and Disputes , Female , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Switzerland , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy/trends , Vaccines
18.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265496, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although vaccines are considered the most effective and fundamental therapeutic tools for consistently preventing the COVID-19 disease, worldwide vaccine hesitancy has become a widespread public health issue for successful immunization. The aim of this review was to identify an up-to-date and concise assessment of potential factors influencing COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and refusal intention, and to outline the key message in order to organize these factors according to country count. METHODS: A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature articles indexed in reputable databases, mainly Pub Med (MEDLINE), Elsevier, Science Direct, and Scopus, was performed between21stJune 2021 and10th July 2021. After obtaining the results via careful screening using a PRISMA flow diagram, 47 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria and formed the basic structure of the review. RESULTS: In total, 11 potential factors were identified, of which the greatest number of articles (n = 28) reported "safety" (34.46%; 95% CI 25.05─43.87) as the overarching consideration, while "side effects" (38.73%; 95% CI 28.14─49.32) was reported by 22 articles, which was the next common factor. Other potential factors such as "effectiveness" were identified in 19 articles (29.98%; 95% CI 17.09─41.67), followed by "trust" (n = 15 studies; 27.91%; 95% CI 17.1─38.73),"information sufficiency"(n = 12; 34.46%; 95% CI 35.87─63.07),"efficacy"(n = 8; 28.73%; 95% CI 9.72─47.74), "conspiracy beliefs" (n = 8; 14.30%; 95% CI 7.97─20.63),"social influence" (n = 6; 42.11%; 95% CI 14.01─70.21), "political roles" (n = 4; 16.75%; 95% CI 5.34─28.16), "vaccine mandated" (n = 4; 51.20%; 95% CI 20.25─82.15), and "fear and anxiety" (n = 3; 8.73%; 95% CI 0.59─18.05). The findings for country-specific influential vaccination factors revealed that, "safety" was recognized mostly (n = 14) in Asian continents (32.45%; 95% CI 19.60─45.31), followed by the United States (n = 6; 33.33%; 95% CI12.68─53.98). "Side effects" was identified from studies in Asia and Europe (n = 6; 35.78%; 95% CI 16.79─54.77 and 16.93%; 95% CI 4.70─28.08, respectively), followed by Africa (n = 4; 74.60%, 95% CI 58.08─91.11); however, public response to "effectiveness" was found in the greatest (n = 7) number of studies in Asian countries (44.84%; 95% CI 25─64.68), followed by the United States (n = 6; 16.68%, 95% CI 8.47─24.89). In Europe, "trust" (n = 5) appeared as a critical predictor (24.94%; 95% CI 2.32─47.56). "Information sufficiency" was identified mostly (n = 4) in articles from the United States (51.53%; 95% CI = 14.12─88.74), followed by Asia (n = 3; 40%; 95% CI 27.01─52.99). More concerns was observed relating to "efficacy" and "conspiracy beliefs" in Asian countries (n = 3; 27.03%; 95% CI 10.35─43.71 and 18.55%; 95% CI 8.67─28.43, respectively). The impact of "social influence" on making a rapid vaccination decision was high in Europe (n = 3; 23.85%, 95% CI -18.48─66.18), followed by the United States (n = 2; 74.85%). Finally, "political roles" and "vaccine-mandated" were important concerns in the United States. CONCLUSIONS: The prevailing factors responsible for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy varied globally; however, the global COVID-19 vaccine acceptance relies on several common factors related to psychological and, societal aspect, and the vaccine itself. People would connect with informative and effective messaging that clarifies the safety, side effects, and effectiveness of prospective COVID-19 vaccines, which would foster vaccine confidence and encourage people to be vaccinated willingly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Hesitancy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Risk Factors , Vaccination Hesitancy/psychology
19.
Heart Lung ; 52: 16-21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751032

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic efforts to reduce virus transmission resulted in non-emergency patients being deterred from seeking help. The number of patients presenting with acute cardiac conditions reduced, significantly OBJECTIVES: To explore the decision-making process, and influential factors in that process, of patients and their family during an acute cardiac event. METHODS: A qualitative research design was employed using purposive sampling of patients who experienced an acute cardiac event during the social containment mandates. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, with thematic analysis of interview transcripts. RESULTS: Twenty-five participants were recruited from three UK hospitals. Themes identified were reliance on informal support network, lack of awareness of cardiac symptoms leading to delayed help-seeking, and an indirect COVID-19 effect (e.g. avoiding treatment). CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the need for informed public health messages, targeting patients and their support networks, that allow those in need of treatment to access care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Decision Making , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Qualitative Research , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736911

ABSTRACT

While young Saudi adults are reportedly prone to experiencing a variety of mental health problems, they tend to delay seeking mental health support. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the barriers and facilitators of seeking mental health support among young adults in Saudi Arabia. A qualitative research design was implemented using semi-structured interviews with 12 young adult participants in Saudi Arabia, recruited through social media platforms, and the interviews were then analyzed using thematic analysis. Two major themes emerged: barriers that impede the process of mental health help-seeking and facilitators that assist individuals in seeking mental health support. The barriers included public stigma and lack of awareness, unprofessional mental health practitioners, lack of accessibility to services and information, unsupportive families, intrapersonal dilemmas, and misconceptions based on religious beliefs. Facilitators of help-seeking included increasing societal and family awareness, promoting the accessibility of services, enhancing sources of external support, personal motivation to change, and online therapy. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of promoting mental health literacy among the Saudi public, particularly with regard to young adults and their unique mental health needs. Exploring facilitators and barriers may also assist mental health providers in developing tailored mental health campaigns and interventions directed at young adults.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Qualitative Research , Saudi Arabia , Social Stigma , Young Adult
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