Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 537
Filter
2.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 77: 103413, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235801
3.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 150: w20230, 2020 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283102
4.
Eur J Pediatr ; 182(5): 2409-2419, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261717

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to describe and assess changes in incidence, clinical conditions, use of mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay (LOHS), and in-hospital mortality (IHM) among children hospitalized with asthma in Spain from 2011 to 2020. We analyzed children aged 0 to 15 years hospitalized with an ICD code for asthma included in the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database (SNHDD). The analysis was conducted for asthma as the primary diagnosis and with asthma in any diagnosis position. Joinpoint regression was used to assess time trends in incidence. We included a total of 85,664 children hospitalized with asthma; of these, 46,727 (54.55%) had asthma coded as the primary diagnosis. The number of boys was higher than the number of girls, irrespective of age group or diagnostic position. The frequency of asthma as primary diagnosis decreased from 55.7% in 2011 to 43.96% in 2020 (p < 0.001). The incidence of hospitalizations because of asthma decreased significantly from 2011 to 2020, with a faster decrease from 2018 onwards. Over time, the proportion of older children increased. In the year 2020, only 55 children had codes for asthma and COVID-19 in their discharge report, and this infection had no effect on hospitalizations this year. A significant increase in the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) was observed over time. Irrespective of the diagnostic position, LOHS and IHM remained stable over time, with the IHM under 0.1%.  Conclusion: Our results show a decrease in the incidence of hospital admissions with asthma either as the primary diagnosis or in any position. The age of children hospitalized seems to be increasing as the use of NIV. Better management of the disease from primary care and the emergency department as is the use of NIV could explain the reduction in incidence. What is Known: • Asthma is the most common chronic respiratory in childhood in high income countries. • The incidence of hospital admissions with asthma and associated factors is one of the best sources of information on morbidity trends and prognosis. What is New: • The incidence of hospital admissions for asthma in Spain decreased in children between 2011 and 2020 with a more frequent use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation and low mortality rates. • COVID-19 did not cause an increase in admissions with asthma in the year 2020.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Patient Admission , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Asthma/epidemiology , Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Incidence , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Patient Admission/trends
5.
Am J Nurs ; 123(4): 10, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247626
6.
Epidemiol Health ; 45: e2023022, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266457

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on mental health service utilization through a comparative analysis of nationwide data regarding inpatient care users, outpatient visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and admissions via the ED before and during the pandemic. METHODS: Data from approximately 350,000 Koreans diagnosed with mental illness were analyzed in terms of hospitalization, outpatient visits, and ED visits between January 2018 and June 2021. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to determine the significance of changes in mental health service utilization indicators. RESULTS: The number of hospital admissions per patient decreased by 1.2% at the start of the pandemic and 0.7% afterward. The length of hospital stay increased by 1.8% at the outbreak of the pandemic, and then decreased by 20.2%. Although the number of outpatients increased, the number of outpatient visits per patient decreased; the number of outpatient visits for schizophrenia (3.4%) and bipolar disorder (3.5%) significantly decreased immediately post-outbreak. The number of ED visits per patient decreased both immediately post-outbreak and afterward, and ED visits for schizophrenia (19.2%), bipolar disorder (22.3%), and depression (17.4%) decreased significantly immediately post-outbreak. Admissions via the ED did not show a significant change immediately post-outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health service utilization increased during the pandemic, but medical service use decreased overall, with a particularly significant decrease in ED utilization. As the pandemic worsened, the decline in outpatient visits became more pronounced among those with severe mental illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Admission , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Mental Health
7.
Ir J Med Sci ; 191(4): 1905-1911, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has put considerable strain on healthcare systems. AIM: To investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on 30-day in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS) and resource utilization in acute medical care. METHODS: We compared emergency medical admissions to a single secondary care centre during 2020 to the preceding 18 years (2002-2019). We investigated 30-day in-hospital mortality with a multiple variable logistic regression model. Utilization of procedures/services was related to LOS with zero truncated Poisson regression. RESULTS: There were 132,715 admissions in 67,185 patients over the 19-year study. There was a linear reduction in 30-day in-hospital mortality over time; over the most recent 5 years (2016-2020), there was a relative risk reduction of 36%, from 7.9 to 4.3% with a number needed to treat of 27.7. Emergency medical admissions increased 18.8% to 10,452 in 2020 with COVID-19 admissions representing 3.5%. 18.6% of COVID-19 cases required ICU admission with a median stay of 10.1 days (IQR 3.8, 16.0). COVID-19 was a significant univariate predictor of 30-day in-hospital mortality, 18.5% (95%CI: 13.9, 23.1) vs. 3.0% (95%CI: 2.7, 3.4)-OR 7.3 (95%CI: 5.3, 10.1). ICU admission was the dominant outcome predictor-OR 12.4 (95%CI: 7.7, 20.1). COVID-19 mortality in the last third of 2020 improved-OR 0.64 (95%CI: 0.47, 0.86). Hospital LOS and resource utilization were increased. CONCLUSION: A diagnosis of COVID-19 was associated with significantly increased mortality and LOS but represented only 3.5% of admissions and did not attenuate the established temporal decline in overall in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Retrospective Studies
8.
J Hosp Med ; 18(7): 568-575, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2244783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased hospital admissions due to COVID-19 place a disproportionate strain on inpatient general medicine service (GMS) capacity compared to other services. OBJECTIVE: To study the impact on capacity and safety of a hospital-wide policy to redistribute admissions from GMS to non-GMS based on admitting diagnosis during surge periods. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective case-controlled study at a large teaching hospital. The intervention included adult patients admitted to general care wards during two surge periods (January-February 2021 and 2022) whose admission diagnosis was impacted by the policy. The control cohort included admissions during a matched number of days preceding the intervention. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Capacity measures included average daily admissions and hospital census occupied on GMS. Safety measures included length of stay (LOS) and adverse outcomes (death, rapid response, floor-to-intensive care unit transfer, and 30-day readmission). RESULTS: In the control cohort, there were 365 encounters with 299 (81.9%) GMS admissions and 66 (18.1%) non-GMS versus the intervention with 384 encounters, including 94 (24.5%) GMS admissions and 290 (75.5%) non-GMS (p < .001). The average GMS census decreased from 17.9 and 21.5 during control periods to 5.5 and 8.5 during intervention periods. An interrupted time series analysis confirmed a decrease in GMS daily admissions (p < .001) and average daily hospital census (p = .014; p < .001). There were no significant differences in LOS (5.9 vs. 5.9 days, p = .059) or adverse outcomes (53, 14.5% vs. 63, 16.4%; p = .482). CONCLUSION: Admission redistribution based on diagnosis is a safe lever to reduce capacity strain on GMS during COVID-19 surges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Admission , Adult , Humans , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization , Length of Stay , Hospitals, Teaching
9.
Am J Emerg Med ; 67: 5-9, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241121

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for healthcare systems in the United States and globally. Understanding how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted emergency departments (EDs) and patient outcomes in a large integrated healthcare system may help prepare for future pandemics. Our primary objective was to evaluate if there were changes to ED boarding and in-hospital mortality before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients ages 18 and over who presented to one of 17 EDs (11 hospital-based; 6 freestanding) within our healthcare system. The study timeframe was March 1, 2019- February 29, 2020 (pre-pandemic) vs. March 1, 2020-August 31, 2021 (during the pandemic). Categorical variables are described using frequencies and percentages, and p-values were obtained from Pearson chi-squared or Fisher's exact tests where appropriate. In addition, multiple regression analysis was used to compare ED boarding and in-hospital mortality pre-pandemic vs. during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 1,374,790 patient encounters were included in this study. In-hospital mortality increased by 16% during the COVID-19 Pandemic AOR 1.16(1.09-1.23, p < 0.0001). Boarding increased by 22% during the COVID-19 pandemic AOR 1.22(1.20-1.23), p < 0.0001). More patients were admitted during the COVID-19 pandemic than prior to the pandemic (26.02% v 24.97%, p < 0.0001). Initial acuity level for patients presenting to the ED increased for both high acuity (13.95% v 13.18%, p < 0.0001) and moderate acuity (60.98% v 59.95%, p < 0.0001) during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to increased ED boarding and in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Admission , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , Hospital Mortality , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital
10.
Diagn Interv Radiol ; 27(3): 336-343, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2217336

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to identify chest computed tomography (CT) characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), investigate the association between CT findings and laboratory or demographic findings, and compare the accuracy of chest CT with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). METHODS: Overall, 120 of 159 consecutive cases isolated due to suspected COVID-19 at our hospital between 17 and 25 March 2020 were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent both chest CT and RT-PCR at first admission. The patients were divided into two groups: laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and clinically diagnosed COVID-19. Clinical findings, laboratory findings, radiologic features and CT severity index (CT-SI) of the patients were noted. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of chest CT were calculated for the diagnosis of COVID-19, using RT-PCR as reference. RESULTS: The laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed COVID-19 groups consisted of 69 (M/F 43/26, mean age 50.9±14.0 years) and 51 patients (M/F 24/27, mean age 50.9±18.8 years), respectively. Dry cough (62.3% vs. 52.9%), fever (30.4% vs. 25.5%) and dyspnea (23.2% vs. 27.5%) were the most common admission symptoms in the laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed COVID-19 groups, respectively. Bilateral multilobe involvement (83.1% vs. 57.5%), peripheral distribution (96.9% vs. 97.5%), patchy shape (75.4% vs. 70.0%), ground-glass opacities (GGO) (96.9% vs. 100.0%), vascular enlargement (56.9% vs. 50.0%), intralobular reticular density (40.0% vs. 40.0%) and bronchial wall thickening (27.7% vs. 45.0%) were the most common CT findings in the laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed COVID-19 subgroups, respectively. Except for the bilateral involvement and white blood cell (WBC) count, no difference was found between the clinical, laboratory, and parenchymal findings of the two groups. Positive correlation was found between CT-SI and, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) values in the laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 subgroup. Chest CT and RT-PCR positivity rates among patients with suspected COVID-19 were 87.5% (105/120) and 57.5% (69/120), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy rates of chest CT were determined as 94.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 85.8-98.4), 21.57% (95% CI, 11.3-35.3), 61.90% (95% CI, 58.2-65.5), 73.3% (95% CI, 48.2-89.1) and 63.3% (95% CI, 54.1-71.9), respectively. CONCLUSION: Chest CT has high sensitivity and low specificity in the diagnosis of COVID-19. The clinical, laboratory, and CT findings of laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed COVID-19 patients are similar.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Laboratories , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 150: w20277, 2020 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2217319

ABSTRACT

In Switzerland, the COVID-19 epidemic is progressively slowing down owing to “social distancing” measures introduced by the Federal Council on 16 March 2020. However, the gradual ease of these measures may initiate a second epidemic wave, the length and intensity of which are difficult to anticipate. In this context, hospitals must prepare for a potential increase in intensive care unit (ICU) admissions of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we introduce icumonitoring.ch, a platform providing hospital-level projections for ICU occupancy. We combined current data on the number of beds and ventilators with canton-level projections of COVID-19 cases from two S-E-I-R models. We disaggregated epidemic projection in each hospital in Switzerland for the number of COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations, hospitalisations in ICU, and ventilators in use. The platform is updated every 3-4 days and can incorporate projections from other modelling teams to inform decision makers with a range of epidemic scenarios for future hospital occupancy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Forecasting/methods , Health Planning/methods , Hospital Bed Capacity , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Software , Ventilators, Mechanical/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Decision Making, Computer-Assisted , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Software/standards , Switzerland/epidemiology , Ventilators, Mechanical/statistics & numerical data
12.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 65, 2023 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2214582

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospital physician workforce in Japan is the lowest among developed countries. Many patients with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with high risk of mortality could not be hospitalized during case surges in Japan and only about 5% of total acute care beds were used as COVID-19 beds nationwide. However, the relationship between the number of hospital physicians and patient admissions remains unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate this relationship in areas with the highest incidences during the surges. METHODS: Data collection was performed for teaching hospitals accredited with the specialty of internal medicine in three prefectures which experienced the highest COVID-19 incidences in Japan (Tokyo, Osaka, Okinawa). Association was examined between the number of full-time physicians (internal medicine staff physicians and residents) and admissions of internal medicine patients through ambulance transport from April 2020 to March 2021. Analysis was conducted separately for community hospitals and university hospitals because the latter have roles as research institutions in Japan. Community hospitals included private, public, and semi-public hospitals. RESULTS: Of 117 teaching hospitals in three prefectures, data from 108 teaching hospitals (83 community hospitals and 25 university hospitals) were available. A total of 102,400 internal medicine patients were admitted to these hospitals during the one-year period. Private hospitals received the greatest mean number of patient admissions (290 per 100 beds), followed by public hospitals (227) and semi-public hospitals (201), and university hospitals (94). Among community hospitals, a higher number of resident physicians per 100 beds was significantly associated with a greater number of patient admissions per 100 beds with beta coefficient of 11.6 (95% CI, 1.5 to 21.2, p = 0.025) admissions by one physician increase per 100 beds. There was no such association among university hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Community hospitals with many resident physicians accepted more internal medicine admissions through ambulance transport during the COVID-19 pandemic. An effective policy to counter physician shortage in hospitals in Japan may be to increase internal medicine resident physicians among community hospitals to save more lives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Patient Admission , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Internal Medicine , Hospitals, University , Workforce
13.
Adm Policy Ment Health ; 50(3): 417-426, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2174475

ABSTRACT

Over the past decade, healthcare providers nationwide have contended with a growing boarding crisis as pediatric patients await psychiatric treatment in emergency departments (EDs). COVID-19 has exacerbated this urgent youth mental health crisis, driving EDs to act as crisis units. Journey mapping is a robust methodology with which to examine strengths and challenges in patient care workflows such as boarding and emergency psychiatric care. Psychiatric, emergency medicine, and hospitalist providers serving patients boarding at a northeastern children's hospital participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Investigators conducted directed content analysis with an inductive approach to identify facilitators, barriers, and persistent needs of boarding patients, which were summarized in a patient journey map. Findings were presented to participants for feedback and further refinement. Quantitative data showed a three-fold increase in the number of patients who boarded over the past three years and a 60% increase in the average time spent boarding in the ED. Emergent qualitative data indicated three stages in the boarding process: Initial Evaluation, Admitted to Board, and Discharge. Data highlighted positive and negative factors affecting patient safety, availability of beds in pediatric hospital and psychiatric inpatient settings, high patient-provider ratios that limited staffing support, and roadblocks in care coordination and disposition planning. Patient journey mapping provided insight into providers' experiences serving patients boarding for psychiatric reasons. Findings described bright points and pain points at each stage of the boarding process with implications for psychiatric care and systemic changes to reduce boarding volume and length of stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Hospitalization , Emergency Service, Hospital , Patient Discharge , Length of Stay , Patient Admission , Retrospective Studies
14.
J Obstet Gynaecol ; 43(1): 2162867, 2023 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186851

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women are one of the endangered groups who need special attention in the COVID-19 epidemic. We conducted a systematic review and summarised the studies that reported adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with COVID-19 infection. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus up to 1 September 2022, for retrieving original articles published in the English language assessing the association between COVID-19 infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Finally, in this review study, of 1790 articles obtained in the initial search, 141 eligible studies including 1,843,278 pregnant women were reviewed. We also performed a meta-analysis of a total of 74 cohort and case-control studies. In this meta-analysis, both fixed and random effect models were used. Publication bias was also assessed by Egger's test and the trim and fill method was conducted in case of a significant result, to adjust the bias. The result of the meta-analysis showed that the pooled prevalence of preterm delivery, maternal mortality, NICU admission and neonatal death in the group with COVID-19 infection was significantly more than those without COVID-19 infection (p<.01). A meta-regression was conducted using the income level of countries. COVID-19 infection during pregnancy may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes including of preterm delivery, maternal mortality, NICU admission and neonatal death. Pregnancy loss and SARS-CoV2 positive neonates in Lower middle income are higher than in High income. Vertical transmission from mother to foetus may occur, but its immediate and long-term effects on the newborn are unclear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Perinatal Death/etiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Maternal Mortality , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data
16.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 66, 2020 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a need for validated clinical risk scores to identify patients at risk of severe disease and to guide decision-making during the covid-19 pandemic. The National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2) is widely used in emergency medicine, but so far, no studies have evaluated its use in patients with covid-19. We aimed to study the performance of NEWS2 and compare commonly used clinical risk stratification tools at admission to predict risk of severe disease and in-hospital mortality in patients with covid-19. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study in a public non-university general hospital in the Oslo area, Norway, including a cohort of all 66 patients hospitalised with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from the start of the pandemic; 13 who died during hospital stay and 53 who were discharged alive. Data were collected consecutively from March 9th to April 27th 2020. The main outcome was the ability of the NEWS2 score and other clinical risk scores at emergency department admission to predict severe disease and in-hospital mortality in covid-19 patients. We calculated sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for NEWS2 scores ≥5 and ≥ 6, quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score ≥ 2, ≥2 Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and CRB-65 score ≥ 2. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for the clinical risk scores were compared using DeLong's test. RESULTS: In total, 66 patients (mean age 67.9 years) were included. Of these, 23% developed severe disease. In-hospital mortality was 20%. Tachypnoea, hypoxemia and confusion at admission were more common in patients developing severe disease. A NEWS2 score ≥ 6 at admission predicted severe disease with 80.0% sensitivity and 84.3% specificity (Area Under the Curve (AUC) 0.822, 95% CI 0.690-0.953). NEWS2 was superior to qSOFA score ≥ 2 (AUC 0.624, 95% CI 0.446-0.810, p < 0.05) and other clinical risk scores for this purpose. CONCLUSION: NEWS2 score at hospital admission predicted severe disease and in-hospital mortality, and was superior to other widely used clinical risk scores in patients with covid-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Early Warning Score , Hospital Mortality , Patient Admission , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
17.
WMJ ; 121(3): 194-200, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We perceived changes in the frequency of and reasons for admissions to Wisconsin pediatric intensive care units (PICU) during the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, and we hypothesized that the rates of total, scheduled, and respiratory viral admissions were lower during the first calendar year of the pandemic than would have been predicted by historical admission data. Such findings would reflect important changes in PICU utilization paradigms during the pandemic. There are no descriptions of PICU admission changes in a single American state during the pandemic. METHODS: We compared all Wisconsin PICU admissions during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 (the study epoch) to admissions in seasonally matched, growth-adjusted "no-COVID-19" projections generated by time series analysis of all Wisconsin PICU admissions in the previous 5 years (the control epoch). RESULTS: We identified 27,425 PICU admissions with 294,577 associated diagnoses in the study and control epochs. Total admissions were 60 ± 9 week-1 in the study epoch versus 103 ± 4 projected (RR 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59-0.68; P < 0.001). Scheduled admissions were 17 ± 6 week-1 in the study epoch versus 28 ± 3 projected (RR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.67; P < 0.001). Respiratory viral admissions were 8 ± 5 week-1 in the study epoch versus 19 ± 9 projected (RR 0.40; 95% CI, 0.33-0.48; P < 0.001). Some admission categories experienced dramatic declines (c, respiratory/ear, nose, throat), while others experienced less decline (eg, injury/poisoning/adverse effects) or no significant change (eg, diabetic ketoacidosis). Except cases of COVID-19, no category had significantly increased weekly admissions. There were 104 admissions associated with COVID-19 diagnoses in 2020, 4.3% of the study epoch admissions. CONCLUSIONS: We describe PICU admission changes in the first calendar year of COVID-19, informing health care staffing and service planning, as well as decisions regarding strategies to combat the evolving pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Wisconsin/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Critical Care , Retrospective Studies
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(9): e2233964, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047375

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study uses national benchmarking data to evaluate hospital occupancy and emergency department boarding during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(38): e30633, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042656

ABSTRACT

We examined the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the emergency department length of stay (EDLOS) and clinical outcomes of patients with severe pneumonia admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) through the emergency department (ED). This single-center retrospective observational study included adult patients with pneumonia admitted to the ICU through the ED between January and December 2019 (pre-pandemic) and between March 2020 and February 2021 (during-pandemic). We compared and analyzed the EDLOS by dividing it into pre-, mid-, and post-EDLOS and in-hospital mortality of patients with pneumonia admitted to the ICU according to the time of ED visits before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality according to the time of ED visits were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analysis. In total, 227 patients (73 patients pre-pandemic and 154 patients during the pandemic) with pneumonia admitted to the ICU through the ED were analyzed. During the COVID-19 pandemic, pre-, mid-, and post-EDLOS increased (P < .05), and the in-hospital mortality rate increased by 10.4%; however, this was not significant (P = .155). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed post-EDLOS (ED waiting time after making ICU admission decision) as an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality of patients with pneumonia admitted to the ICU, pre-pandemic (odds ratio [OR] = 2.282, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.367-3.807, P = .002) and during the pandemic (OR = 1.126, 95% CI: 1.002-1.266, P = .047). Mid-EDLOS (ED time to assess, care, and ICU admission decision) was an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality of patients with pneumonia admitted to the ICU during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR = 1.835, 95% CI: 1.089-3.092, P = .023). During the pandemic of emerging respiratory infectious diseases, to reduce in-hospital mortality of severe pneumonia patients, it is necessary to shorten the ED waiting time for admission by increasing the number of isolation ICU beds. It is also necessary to accelerate the assessment and care process in the ED, and make prompt decisions regarding admission to the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Patient Admission , Retrospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL