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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24171, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593554

ABSTRACT

The transmission of COVID-19 is dependent on social mixing, the basic rate of which varies with sociodemographic, cultural, and geographic factors. Alterations in social mixing and subsequent changes in transmission dynamics eventually affect hospital admissions. We employ these observations to model and predict regional hospital admissions in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic. We use an SEIR-model for each region in Sweden in which the social mixing is assumed to depend on mobility data from public transport utilisation and locations for mobile phone usage. The results show that the model could capture the timing of the first and beginning of the second wave of the pandemic 3 weeks in advance without any additional assumptions about seasonality. Further, we show that for two major regions of Sweden, models with public transport data outperform models using mobile phone usage. We conclude that a model based on routinely collected mobility data makes it possible to predict future hospital admissions for COVID-19 3 weeks in advance.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/transmission , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting/methods , Geography , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sweden/epidemiology , Travel/statistics & numerical data
2.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(10): 671-680, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has been reported to be increasing in frequency during the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to examine the rates of DKA hospital admissions and the patient demographics associated with DKA during the pandemic compared with in prepandemic years. METHODS: Using a comprehensive, multiethnic, national dataset, the Secondary Uses Service repository, we extracted all emergency hospital admissions in England coded with DKA from March 1 to June 30, 2020 (first wave of the pandemic), July 1 to Oct 31, 2020 (post-first wave), and Nov 1, 2020, to Feb 28, 2021 (second wave), and compared these with DKA admissions in the equivalent periods in 2017-20. We also examined baseline characteristics, mortality, and trends in patients who were admitted with DKA. FINDINGS: There were 8553 admissions coded with DKA during the first wave, 8729 during the post-first wave, and 10 235 during the second wave. Compared with preceding years, DKA admissions were 6% (95% CI 4-9; p<0·0001) higher in the first wave of the pandemic (from n=8048), 6% (3-8; p<0·0001) higher in the post-first wave (from n=8260), and 7% (4-9; p<0·0001) higher in the second wave (from n=9610). In the first wave, DKA admissions reduced by 19% (95% CI 16-21) in those with pre-existing type 1 diabetes (from n=4965 to n=4041), increased by 41% (35-47) in those with pre-existing type 2 diabetes (from n=2010 to n=2831), and increased by 57% (48-66) in those with newly diagnosed diabetes (from n=1072 to n=1681). Compared with prepandemic, type 2 diabetes DKA admissions were similarly common in older individuals and men but were higher in those of non-White ethnicities during the first wave. The increase in newly diagnosed DKA admissions occurred across all age groups and these were significantly increased in men and people of non-White ethnicities. In the post-first wave, DKA admissions did not return to the baseline level of previous years; DKA admissions were 14% (11-17) lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (from n=5208 prepandemic to n=4491), 30% (24-36) higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (from n=2011 to n=2613), and 56% (47-66) higher in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes (from n=1041 to n=1625). During the second wave, DKA admissions were 25% (22-27) lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (from n=5769 prepandemic to n=4337), 50% (44-56) higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (from n=2608 to n=3912), and 61% (52-70) higher in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes (from n=1234 to n=1986). INTERPRETATION: Our results provide evidence for differences in the numbers and characteristics of people presenting with DKA during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with in the preceding 3 years. Greater awareness of risk factors for DKA in type 2 diabetes and vigilance for newly diagnosed diabetes presenting with DKA during the COVID-19 pandemic might help mitigate the increased impact of DKA. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Population Surveillance , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Databases, Factual/trends , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/therapy , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Population Surveillance/methods , Time Factors , Young Adult
3.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 601, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic represents one of the most massive health emergencies in the last century and has caused millions of deaths worldwide and a massive economic and social burden. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the COVID-19 pandemic-during the Italian lockdown period between 8 March and 4 May 2020-influenced orthopaedic access for traumatic events to the Emergency Department (ER). METHODS: A retrospective review of the admission to the emergency room and the discharge of the trauma patients' records was performed during the period between 8 March and 4 May 2020 (block in Italy), compared to the same period of the previous year (2019). Patients accesses, admissions, days of hospitalisation, frequency, fracture site, number and type of surgery, the time between admission and surgery, days of hospitalisation, and treatment cost according to the diagnosis-related group were collected. Chi-Square and ANOVA test were used to compare the groups. RESULTS: No significant statistical difference was found for the number of emergency room visits and orthopaedic hospitalisations (p < 0.53) between the year 2019 (9.5%) and 2020 (10.81%). The total number of surgeries in 2019 was 119, while in 2020, this was just 48 (p < 0.48). A significant decrease in the mean cost of orthopaedic hospitalisations was detected in 2020 compared (261.431 euros, equal to - 52.07%) relative to the same period in 2019 (p = 0.005). Although all the surgical performances have suffered a major decline, the most frequent surgery in 2020 was intramedullary femoral nailing. CONCLUSION: We detected a decrease in traumatic occasions during the lockdown period, with a decrease in fractures in each district and a consequent decrease in the diagnosis-related group (DRG).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/economics , Patient Admission/economics , Tertiary Care Centers/economics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Costs and Cost Analysis/trends , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Pandemics/economics , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20308, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467131

ABSTRACT

The positivity rate of testing is currently used both as a benchmark of testing adequacy and for assessing the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, since the former is a prerequisite for the latter, its interpretation is often conflicting. We propose as a benchmark for COVID-19 testing effectiveness a new metric, termed 'Severity Detection Rate' (SDR), that represents the daily needs for new Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions, per 100 cases detected (t - i) days ago, per 10,000 tests performed (t - i) days ago. Based on the announced COVID-19 monitoring data in Greece from May 2020 until August 2021, we show that beyond a certain threshold of daily tests, SDR reaches a plateau of very low variability that begins to reflect testing adequacy. Due to the stabilization of SDR, it was possible to predict with great accuracy the daily needs for new ICU admissions, 12 days ahead of each testing data point, over a period of 10 months, with Pearson r = 0.98 (p = 10-197), RMSE = 7.16. We strongly believe that this metric will help guide the timely decisions of both scientists and government officials to tackle pandemic spread and prevent ICU overload by setting effective testing requirements for accurate pandemic monitoring. We propose further study of this novel metric with data from more countries to confirm the validity of the current findings.


Subject(s)
Benchmarking/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Admission/trends , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106028, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic greatly influenced the overall quality of healthcare. The purpose of this study was to compare the time variables for acute stroke treatment and evaluate differences in the pre-hospital and in-hospital care before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, as well as between the first and second waves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Observational and retrospective study from an Italian hospital, including patients who underwent thrombectomy between January 1st 2019 and December 31st 2020. RESULTS: Out of a total of 594 patients, 301 were treated in 2019 and 293 in 2020. The majority observed in 2019 came from spoke centers (67,1%), while in 2020 more than half (52%, p < 0.01) were evaluated at the hospital's emergency room directly (ER-NCGH). When compared to 2019, time metrics were globally increased in 2020, particularly in the ER-NCGH groups during the period of the first wave (N = 24 and N = 56, respectively): "Onset-to-door":50,5 vs 88,5, p < 0,01; "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin":13 vs 25, p < 0,01; "Door-to-groin":118 vs 143,5, p = 0,02; "Onset-to-groin":180 vs 244,5, p < 0,01; "Groin-to-recanalization": 41 vs 49,5, p = 0,03. When comparing ER-NCGH groups between the first (N = 56) and second (N = 49) waves, there was an overall improvement in times, namely in the "Door-to-CT" (47,5 vs 37, p < 0,01), "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin" (25 vs 20, p = 0,03) and "Onset-to-groin" (244,5 vs 227,5, p = 0,02). CONCLUSIONS: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, treatment for stroke patients was delayed, particularly during the first wave. Reallocation of resources and the shutting down of spoke centers may have played a determinant role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Female , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
7.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 4(9): 669-677, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In April, 2020, clinicians in the UK observed a cluster of children with unexplained inflammation requiring admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics, course, management, and outcomes of patients admitted to PICUs with this condition, which is now known as paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). METHODS: We did a multicentre observational study of children (aged <18 years), admitted to PICUs in the UK between April 1 and May 10, 2020, fulfilling the case definition of PIMS-TS published by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. We analysed routinely collected, de-identified data, including demographic details, presenting clinical features, underlying comorbidities, laboratory markers, echocardiographic findings, interventions, treatments, and outcomes; serology information was collected if available. PICU admission rates of PIMS-TS were compared with historical trends of PICU admissions for four similar inflammatory conditions (Kawasaki disease, toxic shock syndrome, haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and macrophage activation syndrome). FINDINGS: 78 cases of PIMS-TS were reported by 21 of 23 PICUs in the UK. Historical data for similar inflammatory conditions showed a mean of one (95% CI 0·85-1·22) admission per week, compared to an average of 14 admissions per week for PIMS-TS and a peak of 32 admissions per week during the study period. The median age of patients was 11 years (IQR 8-14). Male patients (52 [67%] of 78) and those from ethnic minority backgrounds (61 [78%] of 78) were over-represented. Fever (78 [100%] patients), shock (68 [87%]), abdominal pain (48 [62%]), vomiting (49 [63%]), and diarrhoea (50 [64%]) were common presenting features. Longitudinal data over the first 4 days of admission showed a serial reduction in C-reactive protein (from a median of 264 mg/L on day 1 to 96 mg/L on day 4), D-dimer (4030 µg/L to 1659 µg/L), and ferritin (1042 µg/L to 757 µg/L), whereas the lymphocyte count increased to more than 1·0 × 109 cells per L by day 3 and troponin increased over the 4 days (from a median of 157 ng/mL to 358 ng/mL). 36 (46%) of 78 patients were invasively ventilated and 65 (83%) needed vasoactive infusions; 57 (73%) received steroids, 59 (76%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, and 17 (22%) received biologic therapies. 28 (36%) had evidence of coronary artery abnormalities (18 aneurysms and ten echogenicity). Three children needed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and two children died. INTERPRETATION: During the study period, the rate of PICU admissions for PIMS-TS was at least 11-fold higher than historical trends for similar inflammatory conditions. Clinical presentations and treatments varied. Coronary artery aneurysms appear to be an important complication. Although immediate survival is high, the long-term outcomes of children with PIMS-TS are unknown. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 185-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is always missed. After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done for the period through April 2020. Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was the modified Rankin Scale on day 90. RESULTS: No outcome differences were found in gender, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90-1.28; OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.82-1.26; OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.68; and OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.58-1.22, respectively). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke correlated with poorer prognosis (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.48-0.77; OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.50-0.73; and OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99, respectively). However, hyperlipidemia correlated with better prognosis (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.58). CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or previous stroke correlate with poorer outcomes. Intriguingly, hyperlipidemia correlates with better prognosis. These factors may help inform triage decisions when considering MT for posterior circulation stroke patients. However, large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these observations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thrombectomy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Recovery of Function , Referral and Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(9): 105985, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294009

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 pandemic has forced important changes in health care worldwide. Stroke care networks have been affected, especially during peak periods. We assessed the impact of the pandemic and lockdowns in stroke admissions and care in Latin America. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multinational study (7 countries, 18 centers) of patients admitted during the pandemic outbreak (March-June 2020). Comparisons were made with the same period in 2019. Numbers of cases, stroke etiology and severity, acute care and hospitalization outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: Most countries reported mild decreases in stroke admissions compared to the same period of 2019 (1187 vs. 1166, p = 0.03). Among stroke subtypes, there was a reduction in ischemic strokes (IS) admissions (78.3% vs. 73.9%, p = 0.01) compared with 2019, especially in IS with NIHSS 0-5 (50.1% vs. 44.9%, p = 0.03). A substantial increase in the proportion of stroke admissions beyond 48 h from symptoms onset was observed (13.8% vs. 20.5%, p < 0.001). Nevertheless, no differences in total reperfusion treatment rates were observed, with similar door-to-needle, door-to-CT, and door-to-groin times in both periods. Other stroke outcomes, as all-type mortality during hospitalization (4.9% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001), length of stay (IQR 1-5 days vs. 0-9 days, p < 0.001), and likelihood to be discharged home (91.6% vs. 83.0%, p < 0.001), were compromised during COVID-19 lockdown period. CONCLUSIONS: In this Latin America survey, there was a mild decrease in admissions of IS during the COVID-19 lockdown period, with a significant delay in time to consultations and worse hospitalization outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , COVID-19/transmission , Cause of Death/trends , Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Female , Health Care Surveys , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Latin America , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Patient Admission/trends , Patient Discharge/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106793, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293656

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear how interventions designed to restrict community and in-hospital exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus influenced stroke care for patients seeking acute treatment. Therefore, we aimed to determine how these COVID-19 interventions impacted acute stroke treatment times and to assess the risk of contracting COVID-19 due to their stay in our medical center. METHODS: Retrospective, single center, two-phase study evaluating hospital and community trends from 12/2019 - 04/2020 compared to the previous year and pre/post (n = 156/93) intervention implementation. Phase I assessed stroke treatment times, delay to hospital arrival, and witnessed stroke volume. Phase II, a post-implementation telephone survey, assessed risk of developing symptoms or testing positive for COVID-19. RESULTS: Stroke volume declined by 29% (p < .05) from April to March compared to the previous year. However, no significant delays in seeking medical care (pre Mdn=112, post Mdn=95, p = .34) was observed. Witnessed stroke volume decreased 11% (p < .001) compared to the pre-implementation group, but no significant delay in IV alteplase (pre Mdn=22 mins; post Mdn=26 mins, p = .08) nor endovascular treatment (pre Mdn=60 mins; post Mdn=80 mins, p = .45) was observed. In Phase II, 63 patients participated, two tested (3%) COVID-19 positive during admission and four (6%) within two weeks of discharge. COVID-19 contraction risk during and after hospitalization remained similar to the general population (RR=1.75, 95%CI: 0.79-3.63). Overall results indicated a marked decrease in stroke volume, no significant delays to either seek or provide acute stroke care were evident, and COVID-19 contraction risk was low. CONCLUSIONS: Seeking acute stroke medical care outweighs the risk of COVID-19 exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stroke/therapy
12.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253434, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Descriptive analyses of 2009-2016 were performed using the data of the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) which covers nearly 70 percent of the Thai population. The analyses described the time and geographical trends of nationwide admission rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular diseases, retinopathy, cataract, and diabetic foot amputation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The database of T2DM patients aged 15-100 years who were admitted between 2009 and 2016 under the UCS and that of the UCS population were retrieved for the analyses. The admitted cases of T2DM were extracted from the database using disease codes of principal and secondary diagnoses defined by the International Classification of Diseases 9th and 10th Revisions. The T2DM admission rates in 2009-2016 were the number of admissions divided by the number of the UCS population. The standardized admission rates (SARs)were further estimated in contrast to the expected number of admissions considering age and sex composition of the UCS population in each region. A linearly increased trend was found in T2DM admission rates from 2009 to 2016. Female admission rates were persistently higher than that of males. In 2016, an increase in the T2DM admission rates was observed among the older ages relative to that in 2009. Although the SARs of T2DM were generally higher in Bangkok and central regions in 2009, except that with CKD and foot amputation which had higher trends in northeastern regions, the geographical inequalities were fairly reduced by 2016. CONCLUSION: Admission rates of T2DM and its major complications increased in Thailand from 2009 to 2016. Although the overall geographical inequalities in the SARs of T2DM were reduced in the country, further efforts are required to improve the health system and policies focusing on risk factors and regions to manage the increasing T2DM.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Patient Admission/trends , Universal Health Insurance/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cataract/complications , Cataract/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/etiology , Diabetic Foot/complications , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Diabetic Retinopathy/complications , Diabetic Retinopathy/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Thailand , Young Adult
13.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 496-498, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288680

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic progressed across the UK and Northern Ireland in March 2020, our otolaryngology department began to make preparations and changes in practice to accommodate for potentially large numbers of patients with COVID-19 related respiratory illness in the hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the number of non-elective admissions to our department between the months of January and May in 2019 and 2020. A significant reduction in admissions of up to 94% during the months of the pandemic was observed. Our practice shifted to manage patients with epistaxis and peritonsillar abscess on an outpatient basis, and while prospectively collecting data on this, we did not observe any significant adverse events. We view this as a positive learning point and change in our practice as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/standards , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Epistaxis/surgery , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Northern Ireland/epidemiology , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/standards , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Peritonsillar Abscess/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
14.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 91(1): 241-246, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, New York instituted a statewide stay-at-home mandate to lower viral transmission. While public health guidelines advised continued provision of timely care for patients, disruption of safety-net health care and public fear have been proposed to be related to indirect deaths because of delays in presentation. We hypothesized that admissions for emergency general surgery (EGS) diagnoses would decrease during the pandemic and that mortality for these patients would increase. METHODS: A multicenter observational study comparing EGS admissions from January to May 2020 to 2018 and 2019 across 11 NYC hospitals in the largest public health care system in the United States was performed. Emergency general surgery diagnoses were defined using International Classification Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes and grouped into seven common diagnosis categories: appendicitis, cholecystitis, small/large bowel, peptic ulcer disease, groin hernia, ventral hernia, and necrotizing soft tissue infection. Baseline demographics were compared including age, race/ethnicity, and payor status. Outcomes included coronavirus disease (COVID) status and mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,376 patients were admitted for EGS diagnoses from January to May 2020, a decrease compared with both 2018 (1,789) and 2019 (1,668) (p < 0.0001). This drop was most notable after the stay-at-home mandate (March 22, 2020; week 12). From March to May 2020, 3.3%, 19.2%, and 6.0% of EGS admissions were incidentally COVID positive, respectively. Mortality increased in March to May 2020 compared with 2019 (2.2% vs. 0.7%); this difference was statistically significant between April 2020 and April 2019 (4.1% vs. 0.9%, p = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Supporting our hypothesis, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and subsequent stay-at-home mandate resulted in decreased EGS admissions between March and May 2020 compared with prior years. During this time, there was also a statistically significant increase in mortality, which peaked at the height of COVID infection rates in our population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiological, level IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergencies/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality/trends , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease/mortality , Acute Disease/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/mortality , Appendicitis/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cholecystitis/diagnosis , Cholecystitis/mortality , Cholecystitis/surgery , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hernia, Inguinal/diagnosis , Hernia, Inguinal/mortality , Hernia, Inguinal/surgery , Hernia, Ventral/diagnosis , Hernia, Ventral/mortality , Hernia, Ventral/surgery , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Necrosis/diagnosis , Necrosis/mortality , Necrosis/surgery , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/trends , Peptic Ulcer/diagnosis , Peptic Ulcer/mortality , Peptic Ulcer/surgery , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Soft Tissue Infections/diagnosis , Soft Tissue Infections/mortality , Soft Tissue Infections/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Young Adult
15.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 27(10): 1127-1135, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270830

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine if neurologic symptoms at admission can predict adverse outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: Electronic medical records of 1053 consecutively hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed infection of SARS-CoV-2 from one large medical center in the USA were retrospectively analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed with the calculation of areas under the curve (AUC) and concordance index (C-index). Patients were stratified into subgroups based on the presence of encephalopathy and its severity using survival statistics. In sensitivity analyses, patients with mild/moderate and severe encephalopathy (defined as coma) were separately considered. RESULTS: Of 1053 patients (mean age 52.4 years, 48.0% men [n = 505]), 35.1% (n = 370) had neurologic manifestations at admission, including 10.3% (n = 108) with encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was an independent predictor for death (hazard ratio [HR] 2.617, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.481-4.625) in multivariable Cox regression. The addition of encephalopathy to multivariable models comprising other predictors for adverse outcomes increased AUCs (mortality: 0.84-0.86, ventilation/ intensive care unit [ICU]: 0.76-0.78) and C-index (mortality: 0.78 to 0.81, ventilation/ICU: 0.85-0.86). In sensitivity analyses, risk stratification survival curves for mortality and ventilation/ICU based on severe encephalopathy (n = 15) versus mild/moderate encephalopathy (n = 93) versus no encephalopathy (n = 945) at admission were discriminative (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Encephalopathy at admission predicts later progression to death in SARS-CoV-2 infection, which may have important implications for risk stratification in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnosis , Brain Diseases/mortality , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Patient Admission/trends , Adult , Aged , Brain Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies
16.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(8): 105860, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240473

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Amongst all the global catastrophe due to Coronavirus disease 2019, a significant bright spot is a reduction in air pollution as countries undergo lockdowns to limit the spread of infection. Another reduction that has been reported is in the number of strokes presenting to hospitals, despite the virus implicated in causing a hypercoagulable state. Acute exposure to air pollution has been linked to increase in stroke incidence and the improvement in air quality may be responsible for the decrease in stroke presentations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To explore this hypothesis, we compared the air quality index (AQI) of Karachi, the largest cosmopolitan city of Pakistan, during the lockdown period in 2020 to the same period in the previous year. RESULTS: We found a significant drop in AQI depicting an improvement in air quality. Simultaneously, we identified a drop in number of stroke admissions to less than half from 2019 to 2020 at one of the largest tertiary care hospitals of the city, during this period of interest. CONCLUSION: We hypothesize that one important reason for this drop in stroke admissions, may be an actual reduction in stroke incidence brought about by an improvement in air quality.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants/adverse effects , Air Pollution/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Environmental Exposure/prevention & control , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Patient Admission/trends , Urban Health/trends , Aged , Environmental Exposure/adverse effects , Environmental Monitoring , Female , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
17.
BJS Open ; 5(3)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on healthcare in many countries. This study assessed the effect of a nationwide lockdown in France on admissions for acute surgical conditions and the subsequent impact on postoperative mortality. METHODS: This was an observational analytical study, evaluating data from a national discharge database that collected all discharge reports from any hospital in France. All adult patients admitted through the emergency department and requiring a surgical treatment between 17 March and 11 May 2020, and the equivalent period in 2019 were included. The primary outcome was the change in number of hospital admissions for acute surgical conditions. Mortality was assessed in the matched population, and stratified by region. RESULTS: During the lockdown period, 57 589 consecutive patients were admitted for acute surgical conditions, representing a decrease of 20.9 per cent compared with the 2019 cohort. Significant differences between regions were observed: the decrease was 15.6, 17.2, and 26.8 per cent for low-, intermediate- and high-prevalence regions respectively. The mortality rate was 1.92 per cent during the lockdown period and 1.81 per cent in 2019. In high-prevalence zones, mortality was significantly increased (odds ratio 1.22, 95 per cent c.i. 1.06 to 1.40). CONCLUSION: A marked decrease in hospital admissions for surgical emergencies was observed during the lockdown period, with increased mortality in regions with a higher prevalence of COVID-19 infection. Health authorities should use these findings to preserve quality of care and deliver appropriate messages to the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Emergencies , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality , Urinary Calculi/surgery , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
18.
Int Heart J ; 62(3): 540-545, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216967

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patient admissions to Hunan's cardiac intensive care units (CCUs).We conducted a retrospective, single-center study. Data were collected from patients who were confirmed to have critical cardiovascular disease and admitted to the CCU of the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Hunan, from January 23 to April 23, 2020. Compared with the same period in 2019, the results show that the number of hospitalization decreased by 19.6%; the inhospital mortality rate of CCU was decreased (28.57% versus 16.67%; odds ratio (OR), 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.251-0.996; P = 0.047); hospital stay was decreased (7.97 versus 12.36, P < 0.001); hospital emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rate in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) significantly decreased (76.00% versus 39.00%, P < 0.001); among this, the PCI rate of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) decreased (76.32% versus 55.17%, P = 0.028) as well. In addition, the number of patients transferred from other hospitals significantly decreased (76.79% versus 56.67%, P = 0.002), and the number of patients transferred from other cities also decreased by 10.75%.During the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic in Hunan Province, the number of patients admitted to CCU decreased, as well as the mortality rate; fewer patients with severe cardiovascular disease can be transported to better hospitals from remote rural areas. In addition to epidemic prevention and control, experts in China should focus on improved emergency transport medical services to reduce this impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Coronary Care Units/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Patient Transfer/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
19.
Health Secur ; 19(S1): S34-S40, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214455

ABSTRACT

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, reassessing intensive care unit (ICU) use by population should be a priority for hospitals planning for critical care resource allocation. In our study, we reviewed the impact of COVID-19 on a community hospital serving an urban region, comparing the sociodemographic distribution of ICU admissions before and during the pandemic. We executed a time-sensitive analysis to see if COVID-19 ICU admissions reflect the regional sociodemographic populations and ICU admission trends before the pandemic. Sociodemographic variables included sex, race, ethnicity, and age of adult patients (ages 18 years and older) admitted to the hospital's medical and cardiac ICUs, which were converted to COVID-19 ICUs. The time period selected was 18 months, which was then dichotomized into pre-COVID-19 admissions (December 1, 2018 to March 13, 2020) and COVID-19 ICU admissions (March 14 to May 31, 2020). Variables were compared using Fisher's exact tests and Wilcoxon tests when appropriate. During the 18-month period, 1,861 patients were admitted to the aforementioned ICUs. The mean age of the patients was 62.75 (SD 15.57), with the majority of these patients being male (52.23%), White (64.43%), and non-Hispanic/Latinx (95.75%). Differences were found in racial and ethnic distribution comparing pre-COVID-19 admissions to COVID-19 admissions. Compared with pre-COVID-19 ICU admissions, we found an increase in African American versus White admissions (P = .01) and an increase in Hispanic/Latinx versus non-Hispanic/Latinx admissions (P < .01), during the COVID-19 pandemic. During the first 3 months of admissions to COVID-19 ICUs, the number of admissions among Hispanic/Latinx and African American patients increased while the number of admissions among non-Hispanic/Latinx and White patient decreased, compared with the pre-COVID-19 period. These findings support development of strategies to enhance allocation of resources to bolster novel, equitable strategies to mitigate the incidence of COVID-19 in urban populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/trends , Intensive Care Units/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
20.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 114(5): 371-380, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the national lockdown have led to significant changes in the use of emergency care by the French population. AIMS: To describe the national and regional temporal trends in emergency department (ED) admissions for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, before, during and after the first national lockdown. METHODS: The weekly numbers of ED admissions for MI and stroke were collected from the OSCOUR® network, which covers 93.3% of all ED admissions in France. National and regional incidence rate ratios from 02 February until 31 May (2020 versus 2017-2019) were estimated using Poisson regression for MI and stroke, before, during and after lockdown. RESULTS: A decrease in ED admissions was observed for MI (-20% for ST-segment elevation MI and-25% for non-ST-segment elevation MI) and stroke (-18% for ischaemic and-22% for haemorrhagic) during the lockdown. The decrease became significant earlier for stroke than for MI. No compensatory increase in ED admissions was observed at the end of the lockdown for these diseases. Important regional disparities in ED admissions were observed, without correlation with the regional levels of COVID-19 cases. The impact of lockdown on ED admissions was particularly significant in six regions (Ile-de France, Occitanie, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Nouvelle Aquitaine, Hauts-de-France and Bretagne). CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in ED admissions for MI and stroke observed during the lockdown was probably caused by fear of COVID-19 and augmented by the lockdown, and was heterogeneous across the French territory. ED admissions were slow to return to the usual levels from previous years, without a compensatory increase. These results underline the need to reinforce messages directed at the population to encourage them to seek care without delay in case of cardiovascular symptoms.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Admission/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , France/epidemiology , Geography, Medical , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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