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4.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e051181, 2022 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082989

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Multidisciplinary teams in cancer care are increasingly using information and communication technology (ICT), hospital health information system (HIS) functionalities and ICT-driven care components. We aimed to explore the use of these tools in multidisciplinary team meetings (MTMs) and to identify the critical challenges posed by their adoption based on the perspective of professionals representatives from European scientific societies. DESIGN: This qualitative study used discussion of cases and focus group technique to generate data. Thematic analysis was applied. SETTING: Healthcare professionals working in a multidisciplinary cancer care environment. PARTICIPANTS: Selection of informants was carried out by European scientific societies in accordance with professionals' degree of experience in adopting the implementation of ICT and from different health systems. RESULTS: Professionals representatives of 9 European scientific societies were involved. Up to 10 ICTs, HIS functionalities and care components are embedded in the informational and decision-making processes along three stages of MTMs. ICTs play a key role in opening MTMs to other institutions (eg, by means of molecular tumour boards) and information types (eg, patient-reported outcome measures), and in contributing to the internal efficiency of teams. While ICTs and care components have their own challenges, the information technology context is characterised by the massive generation of unstructured data, the lack of interoperability between systems from different hospitals and HIS that are conceived to store and classify information rather than to work with it. CONCLUSIONS: The emergence of an MTM model that is better integrated in the wider health system context and incorporates inputs from patients and support systems make traditional meetings more dynamic and interconnected. Although these changes signal a second transition in the development process of multidisciplinary teams, they occur in a context marked by clear gaps between the information and management needs of MTMs and the adequacy of current HIS.


Subject(s)
Information Technology , Neoplasms , Communication , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team
5.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2200149, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079582

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Delivering high-quality cancer care to patients through a multidisciplinary team (MDT) care approach remains a challenge, particularly in low- and middle-income countries characterized by fragmented health systems and limited human resources for cancer care. City Cancer Challenge (C/Can) is supporting cities in low- and middle-income countries as they work to improve access to equitable quality cancer care. C/Can has developed an innovative methodology to address the MDT gap, piloted in four cities-Asunciòn, Cali, Kumasi, and Yangon. METHODS: Collaborating with a network of partners, C/Can and ASCO have developed a package of technical cooperation support focusing on two priority areas that have emerged as core needs: first developing consensus-based, city-wide patient management guidelines for the most common cancers and second, building capacity for the implementation of MDTs in institutions providing cancer care in the city. RESULTS: The real-time application of C/Can's MDT approach in Cali and Asuncion underlined the importance of engaging the right stakeholders early on and embedding MDT guidelines in local and national regulatory frameworks to achieve their sustainable uptake. The results in Cali and Asuncion were essential for informing the process in Yangon, asserting the clear benefits of city-to-city knowledge exchange. Finally, the global COVID-19 pandemic prompted a rapid adaptation of the methodology from an in-person to virtual format; the unexpected success of the virtual program in Kumasi has led to its application in subsequent C/Can cities. CONCLUSION: The application of C/Can's methodology in this first set of cities has reinforced not only the importance of both resource appropriate guidelines and a highly trained health workforce but also the need for commitment to work across institutions and disciplines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Developing Countries , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team
7.
Rev. latinoam. enferm. (Online) ; 29: e3397, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2054525

ABSTRACT

Objective: to describe scientific evidence regarding the use of prone positioning in the care provided to patients with acute respiratory failure caused by COVID-19. Method: this is a scoping review. PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews was used to support the writing of this study. The search was conducted in seven databases and resulted in 2,441 studies, 12 of which compose the sample. Descriptive statistics, such as relative and absolute frequencies, was used to analyze data. Results: prone positioning was mainly adopted in Intensive Care Units, lasted from a minimum of 12 up to 16 hours, and its prescription was based on specific criteria, such as PaO2/FiO2 ratio, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate. The most prevalent complications were: accidental extubation, pressure ulcer, and facial edema. Decreased hypoxemia and mortality rates were the main outcomes reported. Conclusion: positive outcomes outweighed complications. Various cycles of prone positioning are needed, which may cause potential work overload for the health staff. Therefore, an appropriate number of trained workers is necessary, in addition to specific institutional protocols to ensure patient safety in this context.


Objetivo: descrever as evidências científicas acerca da utilização da posição prona na assistência ao paciente com insuficiência respiratória aguda provocada por COVID-19. Método: trata-se de uma scoping review. O instrumento PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews foi utilizado para a redação do estudo. As buscas foram realizadas em sete bases de dados, resultando em 2.441 estudos dos quais 12 compõem a amostra. Uma análise descritiva dos dados foi realizada empregando frequências relativas e absolutas. Resultados: a utilização da posição prona ocorreu principalmente em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva, com duração mínima de 12 a 16 horas, e teve como fundamentos de indicação critérios específicos, tais como a relação PaO2/FiO2, a saturação de oxigênio e a frequência respiratória. As complicações mais prevalentes da sua utilização foram: extubação acidental, lesão por pressão e edema facial. Identificou-se a redução da hipoxemia e da mortalidade como principais desfechos evidenciados na amostra. Conclusão: os desfechos positivos sobressaíram-se face às complicações. São necessários vários ciclos de pronação do paciente, fator causador de possível sobrecarga de trabalho da equipe de saúde. Portanto, são importantes um adequado dimensionamento dos profissionais, uma equipe treinada e protocolos institucionais específicos a fim de se garantir a segurança do paciente nesse contexto.


Objetivo: describir las evidencias científicas acerca de la utilización de la posición prona en la atención al paciente con insuficiencia respiratoria aguda provocada por COVID-19. Método: se trata de una revisión de escopo. El instrumento PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews fue utilizado para la redacción del estudio. Las búsquedas fueron realizadas en siete bases de datos, resultando en 2.441 estudios de los cuales 12 integran la muestra. Un análisis descriptivo de los datos fue desarrollado empleando frecuencias relativas y absolutas. Resultados: la utilización de la posición prona ocurrió principalmente en Unidades de Terapia Intensiva, con duración mínima de 12 a 16 horas, y tuvo como fundamentos de indicación criterios específicos, tales como la relación PaO2/FiO2, la saturación de oxígeno y la frecuencia respiratoria. Las complicaciones más frecuentes de su uso fueron: desintubación accidental, lesión por presión y edema facial. Se identificó la reducción de la hipoxemia y de la mortalidad como principales resultados evidenciados en la muestra. Conclusión: los resultados positivos se destacaran ante las complicaciones. Son necesarios varios ciclos de pronación del paciente, factor causante de una posible sobrecarga de trabajo del equipo de salud. Por lo tanto, son importantes un adecuado dimensionamiento de los profesionales, un equipo capacitado y protocolos institucionales específicos a fin de garantizar la seguridad del paciente en ese contexto.


Subject(s)
Patient Care Team , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , Respiratory Tract Infections , Prone Position , Coronavirus Infections , Pressure Ulcer , Edema , Alkalies , Equipment and Supplies , Airway Extubation , Critical Care Nursing , Intensive Care Units , Hypoxia
8.
JBI Evid Implement ; 20(S1): S41-S48, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051813

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to improve communication skills of medical laboratory staff and the quality of health services. INTRODUCTION: Communication is the basis of all interpersonal actions; optimal and efficient communication needs permanent awareness and training in order to learn these skills. The healthcare industry is a constantly changing field, so communication becomes a very important tool that contributes to change. METHODS: This project has been conducted following the JBI framework to improve the communication process in a medical laboratory. A baseline audit involved 30 multidisciplinary healthcare providers (HCP). Using audit criteria provided by JBI, data for clinical audits were collected using a completed audit questionnaire based on direct observation and interview of participants, and checking the records. Once the information had been gathered, the team involved in the project implemented a three sessions workshop focused on communication to solve/improve identified barriers. A follow-up audit was conducted to assess the outcomes of the intervention. RESULTS: The implementation of the project resulted in the evolution of the participants and the cohesion of the healthcare team. The baseline compliance with best practice for audit criteria shows that only a part of those involved in the study benefited from training communication. Lack of time for team briefings and interactions led to different points of view. In the pandemic context, the implementation of the communication improvement strategy was conducted online, with all 30 HCP participating in training sessions. After the follow-up audit, the evolution was demonstrated by the improvement of the HCP compliance compared with the two audit criteria identified with the insufficient compliance in the basic audit. CONCLUSION: Effective communication is a necessity to meet patient needs and to provide high-quality services. The healthcare team received training for communication focused on interpersonal communication.


Subject(s)
Evidence-Based Practice , Health Personnel , Humans , Communication , Patient Care Team
9.
J Wound Care ; 31(Sup8): S3, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025628
11.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(4): 316-323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018335

ABSTRACT

Our city was significantly impacted by the initial COVID-19 outbreak in the United States. We describe how members of our Quality and Safety team were able to leverage skills in relational coordination and process improvement to respond to rapidly changing needs in a flexible and effective way.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Care Team , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Literacy , United States/epidemiology , Weather
12.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 35(9): 1-6, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001449

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To use evidence-based practice and an interprofessional approach to improve outcomes for adult patients with tracheostomies and enhance staff knowledge during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The core interprofessional Tracheostomy Thursday team included staff nurses, respiratory therapists, and nursing leadership who collaborated with surgeons and materials management staff at an urban academic medical center in New York, the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US. The team implemented hospital-wide bedside rounds on all adults with tracheostomies. Skin and safety assessments were performed with peer-to-peer coaching. Data were collected and analyzed to understand areas of improvement. RESULTS: After 6 months of hospital-wide rounding, implementation of a bedside tracheostomy safety checklist, and a continued interprofessional approach, safety measures increased by 48%, and preventive dressing use increased by 24% with improvement in preventing tracheostomy-related medical device-related pressure injuries. The team's work was professionally recognized through institutional policy change, conference poster presentations, and Sigma's international excellence award. CONCLUSION: Bundling an interprofessional approach, staff education, bedside rounds, and standard preventive measures was key to the team's success. A bedside safety checklist fostered team communication and supported direct care nurses in managing individuals with a new tracheostomy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Teaching Rounds , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team , Tracheostomy
13.
Am J Infect Control ; 50(8): 963-965, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000220

ABSTRACT

A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the bundle of techniques developed by the multidisciplinary team to minimize infections in an adult intensive care unit over a 22-year span. Two periods were analyzed: 1996-2006 and 2007-2017. Bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonia declined 58.6%, 56.7%, and 82.6%, respectively (P < .05) from 2007 to 2017 compared with these same infections during 1996-2006.


Subject(s)
Catheter-Related Infections , Cross Infection , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Adult , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Patient Care Team , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies
14.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1532, 2022 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults are particularly at risk for severe illness or death from COVID-19. Accordingly, the Veterans Health Administration (VA) has prioritized this population group in its COVID-19 vaccination strategy. This study examines the receptivity of Veterans enrolled in the VA's Geriatric Patient Aligned Care Team (GeriPACT) to receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. GeriPACT is an outpatient primary care program that utilizes multi-disciplinary teams to provide health services to older Veterans. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with 42 GeriPACT-enrolled Veterans from five states. Participants were asked to identify barriers to vaccine acceptance. We gathered data from January-March 2021 and analyzed them using qualitative methods. RESULTS: Both White and African American GeriPACT Veterans had minimal vaccine hesitancy towards the COVID-19 vaccine. On-line registration and ineligibility of a spouse/caregiver for vaccination were primary barriers to early vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: As the first wave of early adopters of the COVID-19 vaccination effort nears completion, targeted strategies are needed to understand and respond to vaccine hesitancy to lower the risk of subsequent waves of infections. The 2021 SAVE LIVES Act, begins to address identified vaccination barriers by permitting vaccination of Veteran spouses and caregivers, but consideration must be given to creating alternatives to on-line registration and allowing spouses and caregivers to register for appointments together.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Veterans , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Patient Care Team , Vaccination
15.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272942, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993504

ABSTRACT

The rapid increase of acute and intensive care capacities in hospitals needed during the response to COVID-19 created an urgent demand for skilled healthcare staff across the globe. To upscale capacity, many hospitals chose to increase their teams in these departments with rapidly re-deployed inter-professional healthcare personnel, many of whom had no prior experience of working in a high-risk environment and were neither prepared nor trained for work on such wards. This systematic review of reviews examines the current evidence base for successful teamwork in rapidly deployed interprofessional teams in intensive and acute care settings, by assessing systematic reviews of empirical studies to inform future deployments and support of rapidly formed clinical teams. This study identified 18 systematic reviews for further analysis. Utilising an integrative narrative synthesis process supported by thematic coding and graphical network analysis, 13 themes were found to dominate the literature on teams and teamwork in inter-professional and inter-disciplinary teams. This approach was chosen to make the selection process more transparent and enable the thematic clusters in the reviewed papers to be presented visually and codifying four factors that structure the literature on inter-professional teams (i.e., team-internal procedures and dynamics, communicative processes, organisational and team extrinsic influences on teams, and lastly patient and staff outcomes). Practically, the findings suggest that managers and team leaders in fluid and ad-hoc inter-professional healthcare teams in an intensive care environment need to pay attention to reducing pre-existing occupational identities and power-dynamics by emphasizing skill mix, establishing combined workspaces and break areas, clarifying roles and responsibilities, facilitating formal information exchange and developing informal opportunities for communication. The results may guide the further analysis of factors that affect the performance of inter-professional teams in emergency and crisis deployment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Patient Care Team
17.
Health Expect ; 25(4): 1730-1740, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961580

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Improving health services integration through primary health care (PHC) teams for patients with chronic conditions is essential to address their complex health needs and facilitate better health outcomes. The objective of this study was to explore if and how patients, family members, and caregivers were engaged or wanted to be engaged in developing, implementing and evaluating health policies related to PHC teams. This patient-oriented research was carried out in three provinces across Canada: British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario. METHODS: A total of 29 semi-structured interviews with patients were conducted across the three provinces and data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three key themes were identified: motivation for policy engagement, experiences with policy engagement and barriers to engagement in policy. The majority of participants in the study wanted to be engaged in policy processes and advocate for integrated care through PHC teams. Barriers to patient engagement in policy, such as lack of opportunities for engagement, power imbalances, tokenism, lack of accessibility of engagement opportunities and experiences of racism and discrimination were also identified. CONCLUSION: This study increases the understanding of patient, family member, and caregiver engagement in policy related to PHC team integration and the barriers that currently exist in this engagement process. This information can be used to guide decision-makers on how to improve the delivery of integrated health services through PHC teams and enhance patient, family member, and caregiver engagement in PHC policy. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: We would like to acknowledge the contributions of our patient partners, Brenda Jagroop and Judy Birdsell, who assisted with developing and pilot testing the interview guide. Judy Birdsell also assisted with the preparation of this manuscript. This study also engaged patients, family members, and caregivers to share their experiences with engagement in PHC policy.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Chronic Disease , Delivery of Health Care , Family , Health Policy , Patient Participation , Primary Health Care , Canada , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Humans , Patient Care Team , Primary Health Care/standards , Qualitative Research
18.
Nurs Forum ; 57(4): 671-680, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The concept of resilience has been used as a descriptor for individuals and organizations with the dominant themes of bouncing back and moving forward. AIMS: To examine the concept of resilience in providers and healthcare teams during pandemic disasters. RESEARCH DESIGN: Walker and Avant's eight-step concept analysis method. DATA SOURCE: CINAHL, EBSCO Host, PubMed, and SCOPUS were searched using the combined terms "resilience" or "resiliency" or "resilient" and "healthcare professionals," or "healthcare worker" or "healthcare team" or "physician" or "nurse" or "doctor" and "pandemic" or "disaster." METHODS: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Checklist was used to review the literature and apply findings using the eight-step Walker and Avant method for concept analysis. RESULTS: Three clusters emerged as attributes of individual resilience that may be applied to healthcare teams in times of pandemic disasters: (1) resilience is a dynamic contextual process, (2) resilience stabilizes the team to maintain a routine level of function, and (3) resilience is a catalyst for the actualization of innate or acquired skills and ability within the healthcare team. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests that resilience enhances the healthcare team's ability to maintain function during acute changes created by pandemic disasters. Resilience in healthcare teams during pandemics requires future research to explore the phenomenon.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team
20.
Prof Case Manag ; 27(4): 169-180, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922417

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: At one tertiary, academic medical center, two general medicine units averaged 94% and 97% occupancy causing strain on patient throughput. This project was implemented at these two comparable general medicine units, totaling 64 beds. On each of these units, Pareto analyses on causal factors related to discharge order to exit time (DOTE) were performed. DOTE was defined as the period in minutes from when a provider orders a discharge to when the patient actually exits a room. Prime DOTE reduction opportunities were elicited that highlighted the need to address coordination of hospital discharge transportation; that is, arriving family members averaged 120 and 129 min for the two units, and medicars and ambulances averaged 122 and 156 min, which fell above the established 90-min overall strategic DOTE goal. Coordinating efficient discharges decreases the likelihood of hospital bottlenecking and improves patient satisfaction. CASE MANAGEMENT SETTING: The health care team is composed of physician and provider services, nursing, and case management, as well as the patient and family. Team-focused interventions aimed at reducing DOTE included leveraging interdisciplinary communication technology and messaging for efficiency and accuracy within the health care team and proactive scheduling of hospital discharge transportation arrival. Process objectives measured included percentage of the health care team educated and utilization of the discharge suite. Outcome objectives measured included median DOTE times, patient satisfaction, and emergency department boarding volume and times. Significantly, admissions for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) cases were also rapidly increasing early on during program implementation resulting in one of the two general medicine units to be designated for COVID-19 overflow. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: Using Lean methodology, the project design was formed based on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's work on improving hospital-wide patient flow and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) IDEAL patient discharge framework to better achieve the well-known, triple aim. In response to COVID-19 demands, the Plan-Do-Study-Act process was warranted to be able to manage acute changes, using iterative processing. RESULTS AND IMPLICATIONS: This program evaluation study assessed whether a communication training program that taught an interdisciplinary team of case managers, nurses, physicians, and related staff how to reduce DOTE was useful. The program had a material impact on the DOTE metric knowing that the hospital's ultimate strategic goal is to reduce DOTE to 90 min or less. A reduction in discharge time was documented when using weekly data from the hospital's discharge dashboard powered by the Maestro database. More specifically, nurses fully trained in the interdisciplinary communications program aimed to reduce DOTE had significantly lower DOTE outcomes on their discharges compared with untrained staff (i.e., average untrained = 127 min, average trained = 93 min). In addition, the fully trained nurses had 14% more of their discharges fall at or below the 90-min goal compared with untrained staff (i.e., untrained = 40%, trained = 54%). Supplemental research also suggested that the content of the communication training program was very relevant (e.g., empowering families to pick up the patients and using scheduling vs. will-call transportation strategies with patients lowered the DOTE metric). Corollary analyses showed that readmissions were also lowered, and patient satisfaction ratings increased. In addition, the interdisciplinary communications training program can benefit from being updated to include content on how COVID-19 issues adversely impact discharge times since significant relationships between various COVID-19 measures and higher discharge exit times were documented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interdisciplinary Communication , Humans , Patient Care Team , Patient Discharge , Patient Satisfaction
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