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3.
Hepatol Commun ; 7(6)2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326175

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cirrhosis care and outcomes are improved with access to subspecialty gastroenterology and hepatology care. In qualitative interviews, we investigated clinicians' perceptions of factors that optimize or impede cirrhosis care. METHODS: We conducted 24 telephone interviews with subspecialty clinicians at 7 Veterans Affairs medical centers with high- and low-complexity services. Purposive sampling stratified Veterans Affairs medical centers on timely post-hospitalization follow-up, a quality measure. We asked open-ended questions about facilitators and barriers of care coordination, access to appointments, procedures, transplantation, management of complications, keeping up to date with medical knowledge, and telehealth use. RESULTS: Key themes that facilitated care were structural: multidisciplinary teams, clinical dashboards, mechanisms for appointment tracking and reminders, and local or virtual access to transplant and liver cancer specialists through the "specialty care access network extension for community health care outcomes" program. Coordination and efficient communication between transplant and non-transplant specialists and between transplant and primary care facilitated timely care. Same-day access to laboratory, procedural, and clinical services is an indicator of high-quality care. Barriers included lack of on-site procedural services, clinician turnover, patient social needs related to transportation, costs, and patient forgetfulness due to HE. Telehealth enabled lower complexity sites to obtain recommendations for complex patient cases. Barriers to telehealth included lack of credit (eg, VA billing equivalent), inadequate staff, lack of audiovisual technology support, and patient and staff discomfort with technology. Telehealth was optimal for return visits, cases where physical examination was nonessential, and where distance and transportation precluded in-person care. Rapid telehealth uptake during the COVID-19 pandemic was a positive disruptor and facilitated use. CONCLUSIONS: We identify multi-level factors related to structure, staffing, technology, and care organization to optimize cirrhosis care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Liver Cirrhosis , Communication , Patient Care Team
4.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e23, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315150

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the experiences of caregivers of children with tracheostomies. DESIGN: Qualitative semistructured interviews. SETTING: All participants were currently, or had previously cared for, a tracheostomised child who had attended a tertiary care centre in the North of England. Health professionals were purposively sampled to include accounts from a range of professions from primary, community, secondary and tertiary care. PARTICIPANTS: Carers of children with tracheostomies (n=34), including health professionals (n=17) and parents (n=17). INTERVENTIONS: Interviews were undertaken between July 2020 and February 2021 by telephone or video link. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Qualitative reflexive thematic analysis with QSR NVivo V.12. RESULTS: The pandemic has presented an additional and, for some, substantial challenge when caring for tracheostomised children, but this was not always felt to be the most overriding concern. Interviews demonstrated rapid adaptation, normalisation and varying degrees of stoicism and citizenship around constantly changing pandemic-related requirements, rules and regulations. This paper focuses on four key themes: 'reconceptualising safe care and safe places'; 'disrupted support and isolation'; 'relationships, trust and communication'; and 'coping with uncertainty and shifting boundaries of responsibility'. These are described within the context of the impact on the child, the emotional and physical well-being of carers and the challenges to maintaining the values of family-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: As we move to the next phase of the pandemic, we need to understand the impact on vulnerable groups so that their needs can be prioritised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Parents/psychology , Tracheostomy , Adaptation, Psychological , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Social Support , Trust
5.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 419, 2023 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318672

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) are integral to healthcare provision. However, healthcare has historically adopted a hierarchical power structure meaning some voices within the MDT have more influence than others. While power dynamics can influence interprofessional communication and care coordination, the field's understanding of these power structures during the COVID-19 pandemic is limited. METHODS: Adopting a narrative inquiry methodology, this research addresses this knowledge gap and provides an in-depth understanding of MDT power dynamics during COVID-19. Using semi-structured interviews (n = 35) and inductive thematic analysis, this research explores staff perspectives of changing power dynamics in MDTs during the pandemic response. RESULTS: An in-depth analysis generated three overarching themes: (1) Healthcare: a deeply embedded hierarchy reveals that while a hierarchical culture prevails within the Irish health system, staff perceptions of influence in MDTs and 'real' experiences of autonomy differ significantly. (2) Team characteristics: the influence of team structure on MDT power dynamics highlights the impact of organisational structures (e.g., staff rotations) and local processes (e.g., MDT meeting structure) on collaborative practice. (3) Ongoing effort to stimulate true collaboration underscores the importance of ongoing interprofessional education to support collaborative care. CONCLUSION: By offering a greater understanding of MDT power dynamics throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, this research supports the development of more appropriate strategies to promote the provision of interprofessional care in practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interprofessional Relations , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Attitude of Health Personnel
6.
Semergen ; 48(5): 334-343, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe interventions included in the implementation of a multidisciplinary Geriatrics Program that gives support to nursing homes, in coordination with Primary Care and Public Health, in collaboration with other hospital departments. METHODS: An observational descriptive study was conducted in an area that includes 60 nursing homes with nearly 4600 residents from June 1 st, 2020 to October 1 st, 2021. The program consists of different interventions including Telemedicine and support of a Geriatric Consultation Liaison Team. An estimation of avoided costs through these interventions was carried out. RESULTS: The activity recorded was 11502 telephone calls, 2247 e-mails, 313 visits to these centres in where 4085 patients underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment. During this period of time 442 patients received intravenous therapy in their nursing homes, including 7541 different types of medication which 5850 of them were antibiotics. According to the Diagnosis-related-Group (DRG) of the patients that received intravenous treatment in their nursing homes, was estimated a cost reduction of 1,500,00€ and a total of 2800 days of hospital stay avoided. In the group of 198 patients that received video consultation was estimated reduction of costs of 37,026€. A hospital multidisciplinary care team focused on the nursing home patients was created. CONCLUSIONS: This program improves continuity of nursing homes patients care and to enhance communication and coordination among Primary Care, Hospitals and Public Health services and secondarily, reducing hospital costs.


Subject(s)
Geriatric Assessment , Nursing Homes , Aged , Community Health Services , Humans , Patient Care Team , Primary Health Care
8.
Gastroenterol Nurs ; 46(3): 232-242, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301627

ABSTRACT

The advanced practice provider collaborates with other clinicians and works to educate, advocate, and increase access for patients in the clinical setting. Research has shown that advanced practice providers working collaboratively with physicians yield improved quality of care and outcomes; however, the current level of understanding of this role in gastroenterology has not been explored in detail. Across two academic institutions, we conducted 16 semi-structured interviews to examine how the environment of the gastroenterology department aligns with the professional satisfaction of its advanced practice providers. Thematic saturation was achieved, revealing four themes: (1) productivity of the working relationship; (2) inconsistent understandings of the advanced practice provider role in clinical care; (3) mixed advanced practice provider experience relating to colleague support; and (4) autonomy impacts satisfaction. These themes highlight not only a reasonable degree of advanced practice provider satisfaction, but also the need to engage with colleagues regarding the advanced practice provider role in care to allow for better integration into the overall gastroenterology healthcare team. The results from different institutions suggest the need to interview gastroenterology advanced practice providers in different settings to better understand whether similar themes exist.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Professionalism , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Patient Care Team
9.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e064911, 2023 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299851

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the UK, the National Cancer Plan (2000) requires every cancer patient's care to be reviewed by a multidisciplinary team (MDT). Since the introduction of these guidelines, MDTs have faced escalating demands with increasing numbers and complexity of cases. The COVID-19 pandemic has presented MDTs with the challenge of running MDT meetings virtually rather than face-to-face.This study aims to explore how the change from face-to-face to virtual MDT meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic may have impacted the effectiveness of decision-making in cancer MDT meetings and to make recommendations to improve future cancer MDT working based on the findings. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A mixed-methods study with three parallel phases:Semistructured remote qualitative interviews with ≤40 cancer MDT members.A national cross-sectional online survey of cancer MDT members in England, using a validated questionnaire with both multiple-choice and free-text questions.Live observations of ≥6 virtual/hybrid cancer MDT meetings at four NHS Trusts.Participants will be recruited from Cancer Alliances in England. Data collection tools have been developed in consultation with stakeholders, based on a conceptual framework devised from decision-making models and MDT guidelines. Quantitative data will be summarised descriptively, and χ2 tests run to explore associations. Qualitative data will be analysed using applied thematic analysis. Using a convergent design, mixed-methods data will be triangulated guided by the conceptual framework.The study has been approved by NHS Research Ethics Committee (London-Hampstead) (22/HRA/0177). The results will be shared through peer-reviewed journals and academic conferences. A report summarising key findings will be used to develop a resource pack for MDTs to translate learnings from this study into improved effectiveness of virtual MDT meetings.The study has been registered on the Open Science Framework (https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/D2NHW).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team
10.
Am J Manag Care ; 27(7): e215-e217, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295314

ABSTRACT

As the number of inpatients with advanced age and chronic conditions rises, so too does the need for inpatient palliative care (PC). Despite the strong evidence base for PC, less than 50% of all inpatient PC needs are met by inpatient consults. Over the past several months in epicenters of the COVID-19 pandemic, PC providers have responded to the increased need for PC services through innovative digital programs including telepalliative care programs. In this article, we explore how PC innovations during COVID-19 could transform the PC consult to address workforce shortages and expand access to PC services during and beyond the pandemic. We propose a 3-pronged strategy of bolstering inpatient telepalliative care services, expanding electronic consults, and increasing training and educational tools for providers to help meet the increased need for PC services in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Palliative Care/methods , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data
11.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 150: w20233, 2020 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257418

ABSTRACT

Due to the current development around the COVID-19 pandemic, palliative ch has created a Task Force to provide recommendations for health professionals on the treatment of palliative care patients in the various settings ‒ inpatient and outpatient.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Decision Making , Health Personnel/psychology , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Advance Care Planning , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Patient Care Team , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
12.
Hernia ; 27(3): 623-633, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients often need admission at an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), immediately after complex abdominal wall reconstruction (CAWR). Lack of ICU resources requires adequate patient selection for a planned postoperative ICU admission. Risk stratification tools like Fischer score and Hernia Patient Wound (HPW) classification may improve patient selection. This study evaluates the decision-making process in a multidisciplinary team (MDT) on justified ICU admissions for patients after CAWR. METHODS: A pre-Covid-19 pandemic cohort of patients, discussed in a MDT and subsequently underwent CAWR between 2016 and 2019, was analyzed. A justified ICU admission was defined by any intervention within the first 24 h postoperatively, considered not suitable for a nursing ward. The Fischer score predicts postoperative respiratory failure by eight parameters and a high score (> 2) warrants ICU admission. The HPW classification ranks complexity of hernia (size), patient (comorbidities) and wound (infected surgical field) in four stages, with increasing risk for postoperative complications. Stages II-IV point to ICU admission. Accuracy of the MDT decision and (modifications of) risk-stratification tools on justified ICU admissions were analyzed by backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Pre-operatively, the MDT decided a planned ICU admission in 38% of all 232 CAWR patients. Intra-operative events changed the MDT decision in 15% of all CAWR patients. MDT overestimated ICU need in 45% of ICU planned patients and underestimated in 10% of nursing ward planned patients. Ultimately, 42% went to the ICU and 27% of all 232 CAWR patients were justified ICU patients. MDT accuracy was higher than the Fischer score, HPW classification or any modification of these risk stratification tools. CONCLUSION: A MDT's decision for a planned ICU admission after complex abdominal wall reconstruction was more accurate than any of the other risk-stratifying tools. Fifteen percent of the patients experienced unexpected operative events that changed the MDT decision. This study demonstrated the added value of a MDT in the care pathway of patients with complex abdominal wall hernias.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , COVID-19 , Humans , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Herniorrhaphy/adverse effects , Intensive Care Units , Hernia , Patient Care Team
15.
Soins Psychiatr ; 44(344): 41-44, 2023.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275908

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has taken its toll on health care teams faced with deaths and hospital overcrowding. Some caregivers suffered from vicarious trauma. Analyzing the impact of this trauma, its inclusion in a context of tension, fatigue and increased lassitude, is imperative in order to propose adjusted care. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy seems to have a relevant place in this context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Caregivers , Pandemics , Hospitals , Patient Care Team
16.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 149, 2023 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To describe epidemiologists' experience of team dynamics and leadership during emergency response, and explore the utility of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) tool during future public health emergency responses. The TEAM tool included categories for leadership, teamwork, and task management. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey between October 2019 and February 2020 with the global applied field epidemiology workforce. To validate the TEAM tool for our context, we used exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: We analysed 166 completed surveys. Respondents included national and international emergency responders with representation of all WHO regions. We were unable to validate the TEAM tool for use with epidemiology teams involved in emergency response, however descriptive analysis provided insight into epidemiology emergency response team performance. We found female responders were less satisfied with response leadership than male counterparts, and national responders were more satisfied across all survey categories compared to international responders. CONCLUSION: Functional teams are a core attribute of effective public health emergency response. Our findings have shown a need for a greater focus on team performance. We recommend development of a fit-for-purpose performance management tool for teams responding to public health emergencies. The importance of building and supporting the development of the national workforce is another important finding of this study.


Subject(s)
Epidemiologists , Leadership , Humans , Male , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce , Perception , Patient Care Team
17.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 70(1): 78-88, 2023 Feb.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241576

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & PROBLEMS: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an important issue in patient safety. After investigation, we identified the causes of the low rate of resuscitation completion in our emergency department as: incomplete utilization of available first-aid equipment, lack of standards related to task allocation, unclear moving line and instrument placement, lack of teamwork, and poor resuscitation-related communications during the COVID-19 pandemic. PURPOSE: The project aimed to improve the resuscitation performance completion rate. RESOLUTION: The project included designing equipment reminder cards and an airway car, designating specific responsibilities for each team member, establishing standard layouts and traffic flows, and providing situational simulation and team resource management training. RESULTS: After the intervention, the resuscitation performance completion rate had risen to 91.6% from the pre-intervention rate of 69.1%. This has since further risen to a relatively constant completion rate of 98.1%. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the team resource management and situational simulation training intervention in our ED improved both the resuscitation completion rate and the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Simulation Training , Humans , Pandemics , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Emergency Service, Hospital , Patient Care Team
18.
J Emerg Nurs ; 49(2): 287-293, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240183

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to assess if implementing a code role delineation intervention in an emergency department would improve the times to defibrillation and medication administration and improve the nurse perception of teamwork. METHODS: A quantitative quasi-experimental study used a retrospective chart review to gather data. A pre- and post-test measured nurse perception of teamwork in a code using the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) after a code role delineation intervention using a paired samples t-test. Pearson r correlations were used to determine relationships between nurse participant (N = 30) demographics and results of the MHPTS scores. RESULTS: A significant increase in teamwork was noted in 5 of the 16 items on the MHPTS regarding improved communication and identified roles in a code: the team leader assures maintenance of an appropriate balance between command authority and team member participation (t = -5.607, P < .001), team members demonstrated a clear understanding of roles (t = -5.415, P < .001), team members repeat back instructions and clarifications to indicate that they heard them correctly (t = -2.400, P = .029), all members of the team are appropriately involved and participate in the activity (t = -2.236, P = .041), and conflicts among team members are addressed without a loss of situation awareness (t = -2.704, P = .016). There was significance between total pre- and post-test scores (t = -3.938, P = .001). DISCUSSION: Implementation of code role delineation identifiers is an effective method of improving teamwork in a code in an emergency department setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Humans , Patient Care Team , Retrospective Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital
19.
Online braz. j. nurs. (Online) ; 21(supl.1): e20226596, 14 janeiro 2022. ilus
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2229529

ABSTRACT

OBJETIVO: Mapear, na literatura, evidências de oportunidades e barreiras que influenciam a comunicação interprofissional no cotidiano das equipes da Atenção Primária à Saúde e interferem na produção do cuidado do paciente ante a pandemia da Covid-19. MÉTODO: Revisão de escopo, conduzida em conformidade com as recomendações do Joanna Briggs Institute e a extensão PRISMA-ScR, cujo procedimento da estratégia de busca acontecerá a partir da definição dos vocabulários controlados e correspondentes, em combinações com operadores booleanos. RESULTADOS: Serão extraídos dados que constituem características bibliográficas e aspectos metodológicos dos estudos, além de elementos, atividades ou recursos empregados que oportunizam ou bloqueiam a comunicação interprofissional. As evidências mapeadas serão apresentadas em formato de diagramas, gráficos e síntese narrativa. CONCLUSÃO: Pressupõe-se que profissionais de diferentes núcleos de conhecimento assumam compromisso em menor ou maior grau dentro dos serviços. Outrossim, comunicação interprofissional torna-se ferramenta essencial à melhoria do cuidado, especialmente ao enfrentamento de situações pandêmicas. Descritores: Pessoal de Saúde; Relações Interprofissionais; Comunicação; Infecções por Coronavírus.


OBJECTIVE: To map, in the literature, evidence of opportunities and barriers that influence interprofessional communication in the daily lives of Primary Health Care teams and interfere in the production of patient care in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. METHOD: Scoping review, conducted under the recommendations from the Joanna Briggs Institute and the PRISMA-ScR extension, whose search strategy will take place from the definition of the controlled and corresponding vocabularies in combinations with Boolean operators. RESULTS: Data on the bibliographic characteristics and methodological aspects of the studies will be extracted, in addition to elements, activities, or resources used that provide or restrain interprofessional communication. The mapped evidence will be presented in the form of diagrams, graphs, and narrative synthesis. CONCLUSION: It is assumed that professionals from different knowledge centers assume the commitment to a lesser or greater degree within the services. Furthermore, interprofessional communication becomes essential for improving care, especially when dealing with pandemic situations.


Subject(s)
Patient Care Team , Primary Health Care , Communication , Patient Care , COVID-19 , Interprofessional Relations
20.
Quintessence Int ; 53(5): 381-382, 2022 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229931
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