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3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
4.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6): 671-676, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724736

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The current pandemic caused by COVID-19 is the biggest challenge for national health systems for a century. While most medical resources are allocated to treat COVID-19 patients, several non-COVID-19 medical emergencies still need to be treated, including vertebral fractures and spinal cord compression. The aim of this paper is to report the early experience and an organizational protocol for emergency spinal surgery currently being used in a large metropolitan area by an integrated team of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons. METHODS: An organizational model is presented based on case centralization in hub hospitals and early management of surgical cases to reduce hospital stay. Data from all the patients admitted for emergency spinal surgery from the beginning of the outbreak were prospectively collected and compared to data from patients admitted for the same reason in the same time span in the previous year, and treated by the same integrated team. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients (11 males and eight females, with a mean age of 49.9 years (14 to 83)) were admitted either for vertebral fracture or spinal cord compression in a 19-day period, compared to the ten admitted in the previous year. No COVID-19 patients were treated. The mean time between admission and surgery was 1.7 days, significantly lower than 6.8 days the previous year (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The structural organization and the management protocol we describe allowed us to reduce the time to surgery and ultimately hospital stay, thereby maximizing the already stretched medical resources available. We hope that our early experience can be of value to the medical communities that will soon be in the same emergency situation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6):671-676.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Models, Organizational , Neurosurgical Procedures , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , Spinal Cord Compression/surgery , Spinal Fractures/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Efficiency, Organizational , Emergencies , Female , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Prospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263750, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674021

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify meanings of and challenges to enacting equitable diversification of genomics research, and specifically precision medicine research (PMR), teams. METHODS: We conducted in-depth interviews with 102 individuals involved in three U.S.-based precision medicine research consortia and conducted over 400 observation hours of their working group meetings, consortium-wide meetings, and conference presentations. We also reviewed published reports on genomic workforce diversity (WFD), particularly those relevant to the PMR community. RESULTS: Our study finds that many PMR teams encounter challenges as they strive to achieve equitable diversification on scientific teams. Interviewees articulated that underrepresented team members were often hired to increase the study's capacity to recruit diverse research participants, but are limited to on-the-ground staff positions with little influence over study design. We find existing hierarchies and power structures in the academic research ecosystem compound challenges for equitable diversification. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that meaningful diversification of PMR teams will only be possible when team equity is prioritized as a core value in academic research communities.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/ethics , Cultural Diversity , Laboratory Personnel/ethics , Precision Medicine/ethics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Genomics/ethics , Health Workforce/ethics , Humans , Laboratory Personnel/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Care Team/ethics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , United States , Young Adult
8.
Reumatol Clin (Engl Ed) ; 17(9): 491-493, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510266

ABSTRACT

SARS-COV-2 infection has spread worldwide since it originated in December 2019, in Wuhan, China. The pandemic has largely demonstrated the resilience of the world's health systems and is the greatest health emergency since World War II. There is no single therapeutic approach to the treatment of COVID-19 and the associated immune disorder. The lack of randomised clinical trials (RCTs) has led different countries to tackle the disease based on case series, or from results of observational studies with off-label drugs. We as rheumatologists in general, and specifically rheumatology fellows, have been on the front line of the pandemic, modifying our activities and altering our training itinerary. We have attended patients, we have learned about the management of the disease and from our previous experience with drugs for arthritis and giant cell arteritis, we have used these drugs to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Factors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Physician's Role , Rheumatologists , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Education, Medical, Graduate , Fellowships and Scholarships , Global Health , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/immunology , Rheumatologists/education , Rheumatologists/organization & administration , Rheumatology/education , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/organization & administration , Spain/epidemiology
9.
Nutr Hosp ; 38(Spec No1): 41-45, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503007

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The debate from the course preceding the SENPE (Spanish Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) 2020 Conference gathered together well-known professionals who form part of nutritional support teams (NSTs), as well as other specialists from departments whose patients benefit from the services offered by these NSTs. In this article, relevant points from the round table, including strengths and weaknesses detected in the implementation of nutrition support teams, are summarized.


INTRODUCCIÓN: El debate del curso previo al congreso de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Clínica y Metabolismo (SENPE) 2020 reunió en una mesa redonda a profesionales de prestigio que forman parte de unidades de nutrición y dietética, y a otros especialistas de servicios cuyos pacientes se benefician de los servicios de estas unidades. En este artículo se muestran los puntos relevantes que se trataron en el mismo y se muestran algunas fortalezas y debilidades que se han detectado en la implementación de las unidades de nutrición.


Subject(s)
Food Service, Hospital , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Nutritional Support , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e15, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501686

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated an urgent reconfiguration of our difficult asthma (DA) service. We rapidly switched to virtual clinics and rolled out home spirometry based on clinical need. From March to August 2020, 110 patients with DA (68% virtually) were seen in clinic, compared with March-August 2019 when 88 patients were seen face-to-face. There was DA clinic cancellation/non-attendance (16% vs 43%; p<0.0003). In patients with home spirometers, acute hospital admissions (6 vs 26; p<0.01) from March to August 2020 were significantly lower compared with the same period in 2019. There was no difference in the number of courses of oral corticosteroids or antibiotics prescribed (47 vs 53; p=0.81). From April to August 2020, 50 patients with DA performed 253 home spirometry measurements, of which 39 demonstrated >20% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s, resulting in new action plans in 87% of these episodes. In our DA cohort, we demonstrate better attendance rates at virtual multidisciplinary team consultations and reduced hospital admission rates when augmented with home spirometry monitoring.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry
11.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 173, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468745

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), first appearing in Wuhan, China, and later declared as a pandemic, has caused serious morbidity and mortality worldwide. Severe cases usually present with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia, acute kidney injury (AKI), liver damage, or septic shock. However, with recent advances in severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) research, the virus´s effect on cardiac tissues has become evident. Reportedly, an increased number of COVID-19 patients manifested serious cardiac complications such as heart failure, increased troponin, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels (NT-proBNP), cardiomyopathies, and myocarditis. These cardiac complications initially present as chest tightness, chest pain, and heart palpitations. Diagnostic investigations such as telemetry, electrocardiogram (ECG), cardiac biomarkers (troponin, NT-proBNP), and inflammatory markers (D-dimer, fibrinogen, PT, PTT), must be performed according to the patient´s condition. The best available options for treatment are the provision of supportive care, anti-viral therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, IL-6 blockers, statins, thrombolytic, and anti-hypertensive drugs. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) healthcare workers should be well-informed about the evolving research regarding COVID-19 and approach as a multi-disciplinary team to devise effective strategies for challenging situations to reduce cardiac complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Humans , Patient Care Team/organization & administration
12.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 101, 2020 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Having psychologically safe teams can improve learning, creativity and performance within organisations. Within a healthcare context, psychological safety supports patient safety by enabling engagement in quality improvement and encouraging staff to speak up about errors. Despite the low levels of psychological safety in healthcare teams and the important role it plays in supporting patient safety, there is a dearth of research on interventions that can be used to improve psychological safety or its related constructs. This review synthesises the content, theoretical underpinnings and outcomes of interventions which have targeted psychological safety, speaking up, and voice behaviour within a healthcare setting. It aims to identify successful interventions and inform the development of more effective interventions. METHODS: A key word search strategy was developed and used to search electronic databases (PsycINFO, ABI/Inform, Academic search complete and PubMed) and grey literature databases (OpenGrey, OCLC WorldCat, Espace). Covidence, an online specialised systematic review website, was used to screen records. Data extraction, quality appraisal and narrative synthesis were conducted on identified papers. RESULTS: Fourteen interventions were reviewed. These interventions fell into five categories. Educational interventions used simulation, video presentations, case studies and workshops while interventions which did not include an educational component used holistic facilitation, forum play and action research meetings. Mixed results were found for the efficacy or effectiveness of these interventions. While some interventions showed improvement in outcomes related to psychological safety, speaking up and voice, this was not consistently demonstrated across interventions. Included interventions' ability to demonstrate improvements in these outcomes were limited by a lack of objective outcome measures and the ability of educational interventions alone to change deeply rooted speaking up behaviours. CONCLUSION: To improve our understanding of the efficacy or effectiveness of interventions targeting psychological safety, speaking up and voice behaviour, longitudinal and multifaceted interventions are needed. In order to understand whether these interventions are successful, more objective measures should be developed. It is recommended that future research involves end users in the design phase of interventions, target both group and organisational levels, ensure visible leader support and work across and within interdisciplinary teams. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42018100659.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/psychology , Interprofessional Relations , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Safety , Humans , Patient Safety
14.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(4): 899-906, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398200

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: In the wake of the death toll resulting from coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), in addition to the economic turmoil and strain on our health care systems, plastic surgeons are taking a hard look at their role in crisis preparedness and how they can contribute to crisis response policies in their own health care teams. Leaders in the specialty are charged with developing new clinical policies, identifying weaknesses in crisis preparation, and ensuring survival of private practices that face untenable financial challenges. It is critical that plastic surgery builds on the lessons learned over the past tumultuous year to emerge stronger and more prepared for subsequent waves of COVID-19. In addition, this global health crisis presents a timely opportunity to reexamine how plastic surgeons can display effective leadership during times of uncertainty and stress. Some may choose to emulate the traits and policies of leaders who are navigating the COVID-19 crisis effectively. Specifically, the national leaders who offer empathy, transparent communication, and decisive action have maintained high public approval throughout the COVID-19 crisis, while aggressively controlling viral spread. Crises are an inevitable aspect of modern society and medicine. Plastic surgeons can learn from this pandemic to better prepare for future turmoil.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Leadership , Professional Role , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team/economics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/economics , Uncertainty
15.
Nursing ; 51(7): 44-47, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393335

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is a recommended therapy for patients with COVID-19 who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article describes the creation, operation, and evolution of the pronation therapy team at the author's Veterans Affairs facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Veterans/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 587, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused ongoing challenges in health services worldwide. Despite the growing body of literature on COVID-19, reports on perinatal care in COVID-19 cases are limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a 36-year-old G5/P2 pregnant woman with morbid obesity, confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and fulminant respiratory failure. At 28+ 1 gestational weeks, the patient delivered an uninfected newborn. Using ImmunoCAP ISAC® technology, we found no immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies, suggesting that no mother-to-child viral transmission occurred during pregnancy or delivery. The maternal respiratory state improved rapidly after delivery; both maternal and neonatal outcomes were encouraging given the early gestational age and fulminant course of respiratory failure in our patient. CONCLUSIONS: The management of ARDS in pregnant women with COVID-19 is complex and requires an individualized, multidisciplinary approach, while considering maternal and fetal outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fetal Monitoring/methods , Gestational Age , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Obesity, Morbid/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Perinatal Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/etiology , Premature Birth/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
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