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2.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2067024, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819703

ABSTRACT

Medical schools initially removed students from clinical rotations at the outset of COVID-19 for safety reasons when students were eager to help and health systems needed personnel. In response, we rapidly implemented an innovative 2-week rotation for medical students to participate in health systems operations and care through remote efforts including triage and resource allocation. The curriculum also contained online self-paced educational modules covering topics including ethics, crisis standards of care, and modeling. As the health system needs shifted, so too did learners' work. One hundred and twenty-five 3rd and 4th-year students completed the experience over 10 months. Learner satisfaction, confidence, and knowledge assessed through pre- and post-rotation surveys showed statistically significant and educationally meaningful improvement. A near uniform change greater than 1 point (on a 5-point scale) was demonstrated upon rotation completion. Blending health systems and educational structures to meet the needs of both creates unique opportunities to educate students in new ways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Patient Care
4.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 42(Suppl 1): S8-S12, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784405

ABSTRACT

The past decade has seen a shift in health care delivery models to be more value-based: patient-centered, accessible, and cost-effective. One of the primary modes of addressing these needs has been through the implementation of telemedicine-digital health care technology that streamlines and enhances traditional health care delivery. In the orthopaedic setting, there are various methods of telemedicine utilization, each uniquely optimized for different clinical scenarios. There are certain financial and technological limitations when utilizing telemedicine for orthopaedic care that pose notable barriers to uniform utilization across the specialty. Nonetheless, these challenges are currently being tested as orthopaedic surgeons continuously become more innovative and creative as to how they deliver care. As we enter our "new normal" in the post-COVID-19 era, the availability and use of telemedicine will equip orthopaedic surgeons to deliver high-quality, affordable, and accessible care in an ever-changing health care landscape.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Telemedicine , Biomedical Technology , Humans , Patient Care
7.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2100251, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731565

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The HOLA COVID-19 study sought to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on oncology practices across Latin America (LATAM), challenges faced by physicians, and how practices and physicians adapted while delivering care to patients with cancer. METHODS: This international cross-sectional study of oncology physicians in LATAM included a 43-item anonymous online survey to evaluate changes and adaptations to clinical practice. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of caring for patients with COVID-19 and changes to clinical practice. RESULTS: A total of 704 oncology physicians from 19 countries completed the survey. Among respondents, the most common specialty was general oncology (34%) and 56% of physicians had cared for patients with COVID-19. The majority of physicians (70%) noted a decrease in the number of new patients evaluated during the COVID-19 pandemic when compared with prepandemic, and 73% reported adopting the use of telemedicine in their practice. More than half (58%) of physicians reported making changes to the treatments that they offered to patients with cancer. In adjusted models, physicians who had cared for patients with COVID-19 had higher odds of changing the type of chemotherapy or treatments that they offered (adjusted odds ratio 1.81; 95% CI, 1.30 to 2.53) and of delaying chemotherapy start (adjusted odds ratio 2.05; 95% CI, 1.49 to 2.81). Physicians identified significant delays in access to radiation and surgical services, diagnostic tests, and supportive care. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly disrupted global cancer care. Although changes to health care delivery are a necessary response to this global crisis, our study highlights the significant disruption and changes to the treatment plans of patients with cancer in LATAM resulting from the COVID-19 health care crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715384

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to understand and describe the experiences of nurses who cared for patients with COVID-19. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to collect data from individual in-depth interviews with 14 nurses, from 20 October 2020 to 15 January 2021. Data were analyzed using the phenomenological method of Colaizzi. Five theme clusters emerged from the analysis: (1) nurses struggling under the weight of dealing with infectious disease, (2) challenges added to difficult caring, (3) double suffering from patient care, (4) support for caring, and (5) expectations for post-COVID-19 life. The findings of this study are useful primary data for developing appropriate measures for health professionals' wellbeing during outbreaks of infectious diseases. Specifically, as nurses in this study struggled with mental as well as physical difficulties, it is suggested that future studies develop and apply mental health recovery programs for them. To be prepared for future infectious diseases and contribute to patient care, policymakers should improve the work environment, through various means, such as nurses' practice environment management and incentives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 118, 2022 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709251

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about using telehealth patient visits as an educational mode. Therefore, rapid implementation of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic had to be done without understanding how to optimize telehealth for education. With the likely sustained/post-pandemic use of telehealth in ambulatory patient care, filling gaps in our understanding of how telehealth can be used for instruction in this context is critical. This study sought to understand perceptions of pediatric postgraduate trainees and supervisors on the use of telehealth for instruction in ambulatory settings with the goal of identifying effective ways to enhance learning during telehealth visits. METHODS: In May-June of 2020, the authors purposefully sampled first- and third-year postgraduate trainees and supervising attendings from pediatric fellowship programs at one institution that implemented telehealth for instructional activities. They conducted semi-structured interviews; interviews lasted a median of 51 min (trainees) and 41 min (supervisors). They conducted interviews and data analysis iteratively until reaching saturation. Using thematic analysis, they created codes and constructed themes from coded data. They organized themes using the Replace-Amplify-Transform (RAT) model, which proposes that technology can replace in-person learning and/or amplify and transform learning. RESULTS: First-year trainees (n = 6), third-year trainees (n = 5) and supervisors (n = 6) initially used telehealth to replace in-person learning. However, skills that could be practiced in telehealth visits differed from in-person visits and instructional activities felt rushed or awkward. Trainees and supervisors adapted and used telehealth to amplify learning by enhancing observation and autonomy. They also transformed learning, using telehealth to develop novel skills. CONCLUSIONS: To harness telehealth for instructional activities, our findings indicated that trainees and supervisors should shift from using it as a direct replacement for in-person education to taking advantage of novel opportunities to amplify and transform education in PGME. The authors provide data-driven recommendations to help PGME trainees, supervisors and educators capitalize on the educational advantages of telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Eur Geriatr Med ; 13(2): 505-506, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682539
13.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 11(1): 30, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Protecting healthcare workers (HCWs) from exposure to SARS-CoV-2 during patient care is central to managing the current pandemic. Higher levels of trust in personal protective equipment (PPE) and infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies have been previously related to lower levels of emotional exhaustion, yet little is known on how to achieve such a perception of safety. We thus sought to identify institutional actions, strategies and policies related to HCWs' safety perception during the early phase of the pandemic at a tertiary care center in Switzerland by interviewing HCWs from different clinics, professions, and positions. METHODS: For this qualitative study, 36 face-to-face semi-structured interviews were performed. Interviews were based on a guide that addressed the perception of institutional strategies and policies during the first phase of the pandemic in March 2020. The participants included doctors (n = 19) and nurses (n = 17) in senior and non-senior positions from eight clinics in the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, all involved in patient care. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and organized using MAXQDA (VERBI Software GmbH, Berlin). FINDINGS: Five recurring themes were identified to affect HCWs' perception of their safety during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: (1) transparency and clarity of information, (2) communication on the availability of PPE (with the provision of information alone increasing the feeling of safety even if supplies of PPE were reported as low), (3) uniformity and consistency of guidelines, (4) digital resources to support face-to-face teaching (although personal information transfer is still being considered superior in terms of strengthening safety perception) and (5) support and appreciation for the work performed. CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies institutional policies and actions influencing HCWs' safety perception during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, the most important of which is the factor of transparent communication. This knowledge reveals potential areas of action critical to improving preparedness and management in hospitals faced with an infectious disease threat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Tertiary Care Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
14.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0245182, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674002

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Working under pandemic conditions exposes health care workers (HCWs) to infection risk and psychological strain. A better understanding of HCWs' experiences of following local infection prevention and control (IPC) procedures during COVID-19 is urgently needed to inform strategies for protecting the psychical and psychological health of HCWs. The objective of this study was therefore to capture the perceptions of hospital HCWs on local IPC procedures and the impact on their emotional wellbeing during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe. METHODS: Participants were recruited in two sampling rounds of an international cross-sectional survey. Sampling took place between 31 March and 17 April 2020 via existing research networks and between 14 May and 31 August 2020 via online convenience sampling. Main outcome measures were behavioural determinants of HCWs' adherence to IPC guidelines and the WHO-5 Well-Being Index, a validated scale of 0-100 reflecting emotional wellbeing. The WHO-5 was interpreted as a score below or above 50 points, a cut-off score used in previous literature to screen for depression. RESULTS: 2289 HCWs from 40 countries in Europe participated. Mean age was 42 (±11) years, 66% were female, 47% and 39% were medical doctors and nurses, respectively. 74% (n = 1699) of HCWs were directly treating patients with COVID-19, of which 32% (n = 527) reported they were fearful of caring for these patients. HCWs reported high levels of concern about COVID-19 infection risk to themselves (71%) and their family (82%) as a result of their job. 40% of HCWs considered that getting infected with COVID-19 was not within their control. This feeling was more common among junior than senior HCWs (46% versus 38%, P value < .01). Sufficient COVID-19-specific IPC training, confidence in PPE use and institutional trust were positively associated with the feeling that becoming infected with COVID-19 was within their control. Female HCWs were more likely than males to report a WHO-5 score below 50 points (aOR 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.8). CONCLUSIONS: In Europe, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a differential impact on those providing direct COVID-19 patient care, junior staff and women. Health facilities must be aware of these differential impacts, build trust and provide tailored support for this vital workforce during the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Care/methods , Patient Care/standards
15.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 57(4): 1072-1075, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630763

ABSTRACT

Primary ciliary dyskinesis (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with impaired mucociliary clearance caused by defects in ciliary structure and function. The major clinical feature of PCD is recurring or persistent respiratory tract infection. Respiratory tract colonization with drug-resistant organisms impacts the frequency of infections and lung function decline. Protective gear has been employed by caregivers in an attempt to control respiratory tract bacterial spread between patients with cystic fibrosis, but use in PCD is not known. We conducted a web-based survey to investigate infection control and prevention practices of PCD centers in North America, and how practices have been influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The response rate was 87.0%. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, glove, gown, and mask use were variable, and only 3.7% of centers used masks during encounters with PCD outpatients. After COVID-19 mandates are lifted, 48.1% of centers plan to continue to use masks during outpatient care, while the practice regarding the use of gloves and gowns was not influenced by the current pandemic. There is no uniform practice for infection control in PCD care indicating the need for practice guidelines. Mitigation of respiratory virus transmission learned during the COVID-19 pandemic may impact future infection control approaches used for patients with PCD and other lung diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ciliary Motility Disorders , Cystic Fibrosis , Kartagener Syndrome , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ciliary Motility Disorders/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Humans , Infection Control , Kartagener Syndrome/complications , Kartagener Syndrome/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care
16.
Heart Lung ; 52: 152-158, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620699

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus (COVID-19) had a profound impact on the delivery of care in both hospital and outpatient settings across the United States. Patients with heart failure (HF) and healthcare providers had to abruptly adapt. OBJECTIVE: To describe how the COVID-19 pandemic affected practice patterns of HF nurses. METHODS: Practicing HF nurses completed a cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey of perceptions of HF practice. Analyses involved descriptive and comparative statistics. RESULTS: Of 171 nurses who completed surveys, outpatient HF visits decreased and 63.2% added telehealth visits. Despite spending about 29 min educating patients during visits, 27.5% of nurses perceived that the pandemic decreased patients' abilities to provide optimal self-care. Nurses reported decreased ability to collect objective data (62.4%; n = 78), although subjective assessment stayed the same (41.6%; n = 52). CONCLUSION: Nurses' practice patterns provided insight into patient care changes made during COVID-19. Most core components of HF management were retained, but methods of delivery during the pandemic differed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e051335, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The prolonged effects of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to have a serious impact on healthcare workers. We described and compared the experiences of healthcare workers in Japan during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic from March to May 2020, and during the lull from June to July 2020. DESIGN: In this qualitative study, we used a web-based survey to obtain comments from healthcare workers about their experiences during the pandemic, and explored these using inductive content analysis. SETTING: A tertiary emergency hospital in Tokyo, in April and July 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were staff in the hospital, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, radiological technicians and laboratory medical technicians. Many, but not all, had directly cared for patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: In total, 102 participants in the first survey and 154 in the second survey provided open-ended comments. Three themes were extracted: concerns, requests and gratitude. There were four subthemes under concerns: the hospital infection control system, fear of spreading infection to others, uncertainty about when the pandemic would end and being treated as a source of infection. There were 53 requests in the first survey and 106 in the second survey. These requests were divided into seven subthemes: compensation, staffing, information, facilities, leave time, PCR tests and equitable treatment. The theme on gratitude had two subthemes: information and emotional support, and material support. The fears and desires of healthcare workers included two types of uncertainty-related concerns, and requests were very different across the two surveys. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to apply a balance of information to help staff adjust to their new work environment, as well as support to minimise the burden of infection and impact on their families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
18.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 36(2): 468-481, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family members provide the majority of informal care for older adults in Sweden. Nevertheless, by providing a range of assistance, peers often emerge as a central to counter social isolation among older adults. Therefore, there is a need to know more about what informal care provision by older adults to their peers means for different groups of older adults. AIM: This study investigated the types of informal care and support that older adults provide to their peers in Sweden, and how these types of care and support are associated with demographic characteristics and social isolation. We also compared older adults who provide informal care and support with those who do not. METHOD: For this purpose, we used a national online survey named "Involuntary loneliness among senior citizens" answered by 10,044 older adults enrolled in the Swedish Citizen Panel. We adopted a mixed-method design to analyse the survey data, including free-text options (n = 2155) and numerical data. Social isolation was assessed using a score built from the social loneliness items of the UCLA Loneliness Scale. RESULTS: In our population, 21.5% of the older adults were providing informal care and support to their peers. Practical/instrumental help was frequently offered by younger participants (<75 years), men and respondents who were less socially isolated. On a general level, the factors that were positively associated with giving informal care and support to peers were older age, being male, retired, married/living in a relationship, living in an urban area/big city and exhibiting greater isolation. Focusing specifically on social support shows that older participants (>80) and those experiencing less social isolation (score < 24) were more engaged in social activities.  CONCLUSION: This paper is unique in exploring the informal peer-caregiver's perceptions of isolation. Data were collected during the COVID-19 pandemic; this highlights the need to recognise informal care and support between older adults and to acknowledge their contributions as an essential component of Swedish civil society, especially during a societal crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Demography , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Male , Patient Care , Social Isolation , Social Support , Sweden
19.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(4): 1222-1226, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is lethal and transmissible. We assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK CJD surveillance. We hypothesized that (i) disruptions prolonged diagnostic latency; (ii) autopsy rates declined; and (iii) COVID-19 infection negatively affected diagnosis, care, and survival. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated the first year of the pandemic, using the preceding year as a comparator, quantifying numbers of individuals assessed by the UK National CJD Research & Surveillance Unit for suspected CJD, time to diagnosis, disease duration, and autopsy rates. We evaluated the impact of COVID-19 status on diagnosis, care, and survival in CJD. RESULTS: A total of 148 individuals were diagnosed with CJD in the pandemic (from a total of 166 individuals assessed) compared to 141 in the comparator (from 145 assessed). No differences were identified in disease duration or time to diagnosis. Autopsy rates were unchanged. Twenty individuals had COVID-19; 60% were symptomatic, and 10% had severe disease. Disruptions in diagnosis and care were frequently identified. Forty percent of COVID-19-positive individuals died; however, COVID-19 status did not significantly alter survival duration in CJD. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has not impacted UK CJD case ascertainment or survival, but diagnostic evaluation and clinical care of individuals have been affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome , COVID-19/epidemiology , Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome/diagnosis , Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
rev. colomb. cienc. soc ; 12(2): 778-804, 2021.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1573042

ABSTRACT

El objetivo de este trabajo fue realizar una aproximación conceptual y análisis de prácticas que permitan problematizar la inclusión de estrategias comunitarias en abordajes integrales de salud mental. Desde una perspectiva cualitativa, este escrito es producto de un proceso de articulación conceptual y sistematización derivado de un análisis reflexivo sobre prácticas de salud mental desarrolladas en el primer nivel de atención en la ciudad y provincia de Buenos Aires desde el año 2010. Se reconoce la fragilización de redes comunitarias como una problemática colectiva en salud mental, y se propone a la promoción en salud mental como estrategia central que permite, desde una perceptiva no normativa e integral, el desarrollo de acciones participativas y el fortalecimiento de lazos comunitarios solidarios como recursos colectivos para el cuidado de la salud mental. Se abordan ejes problemáticos relevados en la implementación de dichas prácticas y su relación con una vigente tensión entre los modelos biomédico e integral de atención. Se articulan reflexiones relacionadas a la pandemia por COVID-19, evidenciando una necesidad actual de profundizar el desarrollo de estrategias comunitarias en salud mental.


The objective of this work was to carry out a conceptual approach and analysis of practices that allow problematizing the inclusion of community strategies in comprehensive mental health approaches. From a qualitative perspective, this paper is the result of a process of conceptual articulation and systematization derived from a reflexive analysis of mental health practices developed in the first level of care in the City and Province of Buenos Aires since 2010. The fragilization of community networks is recognized as a collective mental health problem, and mental health promotion is proposed as a central strategy that allows, from a non-normative and comprehensive perspective, the development of participatory actions and the strengthening of supportive community bonds, as collective resources for mental health care. It addresses problematic axes revealed in the implementation of such practices and their relationship with a current tension between the biomedical and integral models of care. Reflections related to the COVID-19 pandemic are articulated, evidencing a current need to deepen the development of community strategies in mental health.


Subject(s)
Humans , Patients/psychology , Psychology, Social , Community Participation/methods , Patient Care
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