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1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 169-178, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591240

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To assess the association between individual-level adherence to social-distancing and personal hygiene behaviors recommended by public health experts and subsequent risk of COVID-19 diagnosis in the United States. Methods. Data are from waves 7 through 26 (June 10, 2020-April 26, 2021) of the Understanding America Study COVID-19 survey. We used Cox models to assess the relationship between engaging in behaviors considered high risk and risk of COVID-19 diagnosis. Results. Individuals engaging in behaviors indicating lack of adherence to social-distancing guidelines, especially those related to large gatherings or public interactions, had a significantly higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis than did those who did not engage in these behaviors. Each additional risk behavior was associated with a 9% higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05, 1.13). Results were similar after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and local infection rates. Conclusions. Personal mitigation behaviors appear to influence the risk of COVID-19, even in the presence of social factors related to infection risk. Public Health Implications. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual behaviors for preventing COVID-19, which may be relevant in contexts with low vaccination. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):169-178. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306565).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Risk Behaviors , Hygiene , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9195965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591582

ABSTRACT

Since its outbreak, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused havoc on people's lives. All activities were paused due to the virus's spread across the continents. Researchers have been working hard to find new medication treatments for the COVID-19 pandemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that safety and self-measures play a major role in preventing the virus from spreading from one person to another. Wireless technology is playing a critical role in avoiding viral propagation. This technology mainly comprises of portable devices that assist self-isolated patients in adhering to safe precautionary measures. Government officials are currently using wireless technologies to identify infected people at large gatherings. In this research, we gave an overview of wireless technologies that assisted the general public and healthcare professionals in maintaining effective healthcare services during COVID-19. We also discussed the possible challenges faced by them for effective implementation in day-to-day life. In conclusion, wireless technologies are one of the best techniques in today's age to effectively combat the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Wireless Technology/trends , Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/psychology , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
Rev Neurol ; 73(10): 345-350, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health pandemic brought about by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has limited access to neurorehabilitation programmes for many patients who have suffered stroke, traumatic brain injury or acquired brain damage due to some other cause. As telerehabilitation allows for the provision of care in situations of social distancing, it may mitigate the negative effects of confinement. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, adherence and usability of a teleneurorehabilitation intervention for patients with acquired brain injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients included in a face-to-face neurorehabilitation programme at the time of the declaration of the state of alarm in Spain due to COVID-19 and who agreed to participate in the study were included in a teleneurorehabilitation programme. The effectiveness of the programme, understood as an improvement in independence, was quantified with the Barthel index. Adherence to the programme and usability of the tool were explored through questionnaires. RESULTS: Altogether, 46 patients, accounting for 70.6% of the total, participated in the study. Participants significantly improved their independence and showed an improvement in the Barthel index between the start (77.3 ± 28.6) and the end of the programme (82.3 ± 26). Adherence to the intervention was very high (8.1 ± 2.2 out of 10) and the online sessions were the most highly rated content. The tool used showed a high usability (50.1 ± 9.9 out of 60) and could be used without assistance by more than half the participants. CONCLUSION: The teleneurorehabilitation intervention was found to be effective in improving patients' independence, and promoted a high degree of adherence and usability.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/rehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Program Evaluation , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Virtual Reality
4.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 158, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506686

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading chronic rheumatic disease in childhood. To achieve adherence to therapy, in-depth understanding of disease and treatment options are important. OBJECTIVE: Development of specifically designed illustrations and standardised, easy-to-read texts for children and adolescents with JIA. Education materials were tested for comprehensibility and content validity. We hypothesised that children would be able to increase their knowledge about JIA after presentation of materials. METHODS: The illustrations were designed by a graphic artist and the informative texts consecutively transformed to easy-to-read language. The materials appear as a modular system to allow individualized information for each patient. The illustrations and texts were tested for knowledge gain and improvement of self-efficacy in children affected by JIA/ rheumatic diseases and controls. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was tested as an overall assessment of patients' well-being. RESULTS: 46 controls (71% female) and 38 patients (48% female) with a median age of 11 years were tested in a standardised setting. In both groups knowledge gain was significant (controls: t (44) = 11.08, p < 0.001, d = 1.65; patients: t (37) = 7.48, p < 0.001, d = 1.21). The control group had a significantly higher enhancement of disease knowledge compared to patients' group (p = .046) The follow-up testing was only performed in one school class (20 controls) due to Covid-19 pandemic with significant improvement compared to the pre-test results (p = .002). The enhancement of self-efficacy through the teaching session was significantly higher in the patients' group. No impairment of HRQoL was seen. CONCLUSION: Explaining juvenile rheumatic diseases and therapeutic strategies is an important task in paediatric rheumatology. To avoid incomprehensible explanations in medical jargon, illustrations and easy-to-read texts were developed. Standardised presentation of the newly created materials resulted in a significant improvement of disease knowledge in patients and controls in addition to an enhancement of self-efficacy in patients.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Compliance , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Adolescent , Art , Child , Comprehension , Female , Humans , Male
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258781, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel viral pandemics present significant challenges to global public health. Non-pharmaceutical interventions (e.g. social distancing) are an important means through which to control the transmission of such viruses. One of the key factors determining the effectiveness of such measures is the level of public adherence to them. Research to date has focused on quantitative exploration of adherence and non-adherence, with a relative lack of qualitative exploration of the reasons for non-adherence. OBJECTIVE: To explore participants' perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 policy measures by self and others in the UK, focusing on perceived reasons for non-adherence. METHODS: Qualitative study comprising 12 focus groups conducted via video-conferencing between 25th September and 13th November 2020. Participants were 51 UK residents aged 18 and above, reflecting a range of ages, genders and race/ethnicities. Data were analysed using a thematic approach. RESULTS: Participants reported seeing an increase in non-adherence in others over the course of the pandemic. Reports of non-adherence in self were lower than reports of non-adherence in others. Analysis revealed six main themes related to participants' reported reasons for non-adherence in self and others: (1) 'Alert fatigue' (where people find it difficult to follow, or switch off from, information about frequently changing rules or advice) (2) Inconsistent rules (3) Lack of trust in government (4) Learned Helplessness (5) Resistance and rebelliousness (6)The impact of vaccines on risk perception. Participants perceived a number of systemic failures (e.g. unclear policy, untrustworthy policymakers) to strongly contribute to two forms non-adherence-violations and errors. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that latent and systemic failures-in the form of policy decisions that are commonly experienced as too changeable, inconsistent and confusing, and policy makers that are commonly perceived as untrustworthy-may play a significant role in creating the conditions that enable or encourage non-adherence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Public Health/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Public Health/methods , Public Opinion , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
8.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257945, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438354

ABSTRACT

A crucial question in the governance of infectious disease outbreaks is how to ensure that people continue to adhere to mitigation measures for the longer duration. The present paper examines this question by means of a set of cross-sectional studies conducted in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, in May, June, and July of 2020. Using stratified samples that mimic the demographic characteristics of the U.S. population, it seeks to understand to what extent Americans continued to adhere to social distancing measures in the period after the first lockdown ended. Moreover, it seeks to uncover which variables sustained (or undermined) adherence across this period. For this purpose, we examined a broad range of factors, relating to people's (1) knowledge and understanding of the mitigation measures, (2) perceptions of their costs and benefits, (3) perceptions of legitimacy and procedural justice, (4) personal factors, (5) social environment, and (6) practical circumstances. Our findings reveal that adherence was chiefly shaped by three major factors: respondents adhered more when they (a) had greater practical capacity to adhere, (b) morally agreed more with the measures, and (c) perceived the virus as a more severe health threat. Adherence was shaped to a lesser extent by impulsivity, knowledge of social distancing measures, opportunities for violating, personal costs, and descriptive social norms. The results also reveal, however, that adherence declined across this period, which was partly explained by changes in people's moral alignment, threat perceptions, knowledge, and perceived social norms. These findings show that adherence originates from a broad range of factors that develop dynamically across time. Practically these insights help to improve pandemic governance, as well as contributing theoretically to the study of compliance and the way that rules come to shape behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Physical Distancing , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , United States/epidemiology
9.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257739, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438351

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Government of Tamil Nadu, India, mandated the face mask wearing in public places as one of the mitigation measures of COVID-19. We established a surveillance system for monitoring the face mask usage. This study aimed to estimate the proportion of the population who wear face masks appropriately (covering nose, mouth, and chin) in the slums and non-slums of Chennai at different time points. METHODS: We conducted cross-sectional surveys among the residents of Chennai at two-time points of October and December 2020. The sample size for outdoor mask compliance for the first and second rounds of the survey was 1800 and 1600, respectively, for each of the two subgroups-slums and non-slums. In the second round, we included 640 individuals each in the slums and non-slums indoor public places and 1650 individuals in eleven shopping malls. We calculated the proportions and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for the mask compliance outdoors and indoors by age, gender, region, and setting (slum and non-slum). RESULTS: We observed 3600 and 3200 individuals in the first and second surveys, respectively, for outdoor mask compliance. In both rounds, the prevalence of appropriate mask use outdoors was significantly lower in the slums (28%-29%) than non-slum areas (36%-35%) of Chennai (p<0.01). Outdoor mask compliance was similar within slum and non-slum subgroups across the two surveys. Lack of mask use was higher in the non-slums in the second round (50%) than in the first round of the survey (43%) (p<0.05). In the indoor settings in the 2nd survey, 10%-11% among 1280 individuals wore masks appropriately. Of the 1650 observed in the malls, 947 (57%) wore masks appropriately. CONCLUSION: Nearly one-third of residents of Chennai, India, correctly wore masks in public places. We recommend periodic surveys, enforcement of mask compliance in public places, and mass media campaigns to promote appropriate mask use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Masks , Patient Compliance , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged
10.
Sci Prog ; 104(3): 368504211042980, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the truthfulness of patients about their pre-appointment COVID-19 screening tests at a dental clinic. METHODS: A total of 613 patients were recruited for the study from the dental clinic at the Faculty of Dentistry, Najran University, Saudi Arabia. The data collection was done in three parts from the patients who visited the hospital to receive dental treatment. The first part included the socio-demographic characteristics of the patients and the COVID-19 swab tests performed within the past 14 days. The second part was the clinical examination, and the third part was a confirmation of the swab test taken by the patient by checking the Hesen website using the patient ID. After data collection, statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 26.0. Descriptive analysis was done and expressed as mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentage (%). A cross-tabulation, also described as a contingency table, was used to identify trends and patterns across data and explain the correlation between different variables. RESULTS: It was seen from the status of the swab test within 14 days of the patient's arrival at the hospital for the dental treatment that 18 (2.9%) patients lied about the pre-treatment swab test within 14 days, and 595 (97.1%) were truthful. The observed and expected counts showed across genders and diagnosis a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001), and there was no significant difference seen across different age groups (p = 0.064) of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dental healthcare workers are worried and assume a high risk of COVID-19 infection as the patients are not truthful about the pre-treatment COVID-19 swab test. Routine rapid tests on patients and the healthcare staff are a feasible option for lowering overall risks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Truth Disclosure/ethics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Dental Offices/ethics , Dental Offices/organization & administration , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Patient Compliance/psychology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257210, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403321

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV, ages 10-19) experience complex challenges to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and remain in care, and may be vulnerable to wide-scale disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We assessed for a range of effects of the pandemic on ALHIV in western Kenya, and whether effects were greater for ALHIV with recent histories of being lost to program (LTP). METHODS: ALHIV were recruited from an ongoing prospective study at 3 sites in western Kenya. The parent study enrolled participants from February 2019-September 2020, into groups of ALHIV either 1) retained in care or 2) LTP and traced in the community. Phone interviews from July 2020-January 2021 assessed effects of the pandemic on financial and food security, healthcare access and behaviors, and mental health. Responses were compared among the parent study groups. RESULTS: Phone surveys were completed with 334 ALHIV or their caregivers, including 275/308 (89.3%) in the retained group and 59/70 (84.3%) among those LTP at initial enrollment. During the pandemic, a greater proportion of LTP adolescents were no longer engaged in school (45.8% vs. 36.4%, p = 0.017). Over a third (120, 35.9%) of adolescents reported lost income for someone they relied on. In total, 135 (40.4%) did not have enough food either some (121, 36.2%) or most (14, 4.2%) of the time. More LTP adolescents (4/59, 6.8% vs. 2/275, 0.7%, p = 0.010) reported increased difficulties refilling ART. Adolescent PHQ-2 and GAD-2 scores were ≥3 for 5.6% and 5.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating socioeconomic effects for Kenyan ALHIV and their households. ALHIV with recent care disengagement may be especially vulnerable. Meanwhile, sustained ART access and adherence potentially signal resilience and strengths of ALHIV and their care programs. Findings from this survey indicate the critical need for support to ALHIV during this crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Adolescent , Child , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology , Male , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
J Appl Behav Anal ; 54(2): 582-599, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384186

ABSTRACT

The current study taught 6 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to increase passive compliance of wearing a facemask across sequentially increasing durations of time. A changing-criterion design embedded within a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a resetting differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) without escape extinction procedure on passive compliance. Terminal probe sessions determined DRO fading intervals. Results showed that 2 participants acquired mastery level passive compliance (30 min) without fading during the initial baseline sessions. The remaining 4 participants acquired mastery level passive compliance following fading intervals within the DRO intervention. Participants' passive compliance generalized across 2 novel settings. This study replicates previous studies and extends empirical support for the use of DRO without escape extinction interventions for increasing passive compliance with medical devices in children with ASD.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , Masks , Patient Compliance/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male
15.
Pediatr Transplant ; 25(8): e14121, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young adults who underwent liver transplantation in childhood (YALTs) are highly vulnerable to non-adherent behavior and psychosocial problems. During the COVID-19 pandemic, special efforts may be necessary to maintain contact with these patients and offer support. This can be achieved through the use of telemedicine. The study's objective was to assess adherence and the psychosocial situation of YALTs during the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany and to evaluate the utilization of video consultations. METHODS: In May 2020, a questionnaire was sent to YALTs treated at the Hamburg University Transplant Center, accompanied by the offer of video appointments with the attending physician. The questionnaire included the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale 7, the Patient Health Questionnaire 2, and questions compiled by the authors. RESULTS: Of 98 YALTs, 12% used the video consultation, while 65% had an in-person appointment. The 56 patients who completed the questionnaire did not report reduced medication adherence during the pandemic, but 40% missed follow-up visits with their primary care physician or check-up laboratory tests. About 70% of YALTs were afraid to visit their physician and the transplant center, and 34% were afraid of a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Mental health and well-being were unimpaired. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, YALTs in our study did not show an increased need for psychosocial support, but a majority were afraid to attend medical appointments, and 40% reported lower appointment adherence. Acceptance of video consultations was lower than expected. The reasons for this need to be further investigated in order to optimize care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Liver Transplantation/psychology , Patient Compliance , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Germany , Humans , Male , Medication Adherence , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 716814, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369739

ABSTRACT

Regardless of the advocacies made by the media and numerous organizations about the need for preventing the spread of COVID-19, there still exists a gap as far as compliance to regular implementation of the preventive mechanisms within communities is concerned. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to examine compliance to personal protective behavioral recommendations to contain the spread of COVID-19 among urban residents engaged in the informal economic activities in Wolaita Sodo town, Southern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design was used where quantitative data were collected through the survey research method. Three hundred and eighty-four participants of the urban-based informal economy were randomly selected and contacted in their own natural settings with an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data were inserted into SPSS software for analysis that involved both descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency and percentage distributions, binomial and multinomial logistic regressions. The results of the research indicated that only 35.4% of the respondents regularly wore a mask. In addition, 54.9% of the survey participants disclosed that they do not clean their hands with disinfectants after touching objects under circumstances where they cannot get access to water and soap. Moreover, the most commonly reported reason of respondents for non-compliance to regular wearing of a mask has been its inconvenience or discomfort (62.8%), followed by the need to appear indifferent because most people around them do not wear a mask (25.2%). Furthermore, experiences of the respondents of regularly wearing a mask are significantly associated with regular attendance of the media regarding the preventive mechanisms of COVID-19 (OR = 0.224; P < 0.001; 95%C.I: 0.109-0.460), knowledge of someone ever infected by COVID-19 (OR = 0.402; P < 0.05; 95%C.I: 0.190-0.851), the belief that COVID-19 causes a severe illness (OR = 0.444; P < 0.05; 95%C.I: 0.201-0.980), and perception of the likelihood of dying as a result of infection by COVID-19 (OR = 0.374; P < 0.01; 95% C.I: 0.197-0.711). The authors have found a low level of compliance to the recommended safety measures, especially wearing of masks. It is, therefore, important that continued efforts of raising awareness should be done by all the concerned bodies. Above all, urban safety net programs that aim at keeping such social groups at home, at least during the critical wave of the pandemic, should also be strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Humans
17.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256495, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365432

ABSTRACT

Social distancing measures implemented by governments worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic have proven an effective intervention to control the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. There is a growing literature on predictors of adherence behaviours to social distancing measures, however, there are no comprehensive insights into the nature and types of non-adherence behaviours. To address this gap in the literature, we studied non-adherence in terms of counts of infringements and people's accounts on their behaviours in a sample of North London residents. We focused on the following social distancing rules: keeping 2 mts. distancing, meeting family and friends, and going out for non-essential reasons. A mixed-methods explanatory sequential design was used comprising an online survey (May 1-31, 2020) followed by semi-structured in-depth interviews held with a purposive sample of survey respondents (August 5 -September 21, 2020). A negative binomial regression model (quantitative) and Framework Analysis (qualitative) were undertaken.681 individuals completed the survey, and 30 individuals were interviewed. We integrated survey and interview findings following three levels of the Social Ecological model: individual, interpersonal and community levels. We identified non-adherence behaviours as unintentional (barriers beyond individual's control) and intentional (deliberate decision). Unintentional adherence was reported by interviewees as, lack of controllability in keeping 2 mts. distancing, environmental constraints, social responsibility towards the community and feeling low risk. Intentional non-adherence was statistically associated with and reported as lack of trust in Government, support from friends, and lack of knowledge about rules. In addition, interviewees reported individual risk assessment and decision making on the extent to following the rules, and perceived lack of adherence in the local area. Our findings indicate that unintentional and intentional non-adherence should be improved by Government partnerships with local communities to build trust in social distancing measures; tailored messaging to young adults emphasising the need of protecting others whilst clarifying the risk of transmission; and ensuring COVID-secured environments by working with environmental health officers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intention , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Compliance , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Theoretical
19.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(4): 221-229, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348726

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Indonesian government issued large-scale social restrictions (called Pembatasan Sosial Berskala Besar, or PSBB) at the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to control the spread of COVID-19 in Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Tangerang, and Bekasi (Greater Jakarta). Public compliance poses a challenge when implementing large-scale social restrictions, and various factors have contributed to public non-compliance with the regulation. This study aimed to determine the degree of non-compliance and identify the factors that contributed to public non-compliance with the PSBB in Greater Jakarta, Indonesia. METHODS: This was a quantitative study with a cross-sectional design. A total of 839 residents of Greater Jakarta participated in this study. Data were collected online using a Google Form, and convenience sampling was undertaken. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to explore the relationships between public non-compliance with the PSBB regulation and socio-demographic variables, respondents' opinion of the PSBB, and social capital. RESULTS: A total of 22.6% of subjects reported participating in activities that did not comply with the PSBB. The variables that most affected non-compliance with the PSBB were age, gender, income, opinion of the PSBB, and social capital. CONCLUSIONS: Strengthening social capital and providing information about COVID-19 prevention measures, such as washing one's hands with soap, wearing masks properly, and maintaining social distancing, is essential. Robust public understanding will foster trust and cooperation with regard to COVID-19 prevention efforts and provide a basis for mutual agreement regarding rules/penalties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance , Physical Distancing , Socioeconomic Factors , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Indonesia , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 543, 2021 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1342808

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to understand the perceptions of new mothers using virtual care via video conferencing to gain insight into the benefits and barriers of virtual care for obstetric patients. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients attending the Kingston Health Sciences Centre. The interviews were 20-25 min in length and recorded through an audio recorder. Thematic analysis was conducted in order to derive the major themes explored in this study. RESULTS: New mothers must often adopt new routines to balance their needs and their child's needs. These routines could impact compliance and motivation to attend follow-up care. In our study, participants expressed high satisfaction with virtual care, emphasizing benefits related to comfort, convenience, communication, socioeconomic factors, and the ease of technology use. Participants also perceived that they could receive emotional support and build trust with their health care providers despite the remote nature of their care. Due to its ease of use and increased accessibility, we argue that virtual care shows promise to facilitate long-term compliance to care in obstetric patients. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual care is a useful modality that could improve compliance to obstetric care. Further research and clinical endeavours should examine how social factors and determinants intersect to determine how they underpin patient perceptions of virtual and in-person care.


Subject(s)
Mothers/psychology , Postnatal Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing , Adult , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Social Determinants of Health
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