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1.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 38(6): e5949, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238482

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association between depression and non-compliance with COVID-19 preventive behaviors among community-dwelling South Korean older adults. METHODS: We utilized the 2020 Korean Community Health Survey-a community-based nationwide survey. A score of 10 points or higher on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was defined as depression. Non-compliance with COVID-19 preventive behaviors was assessed on the following three behaviors: washing hands, wearing masks, and watching distance. We also included socio-demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and COVID-19-related characteristics as covariates. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, and all statistical analyses were stratified by sex. RESULTS: The 70,693 participants included 29,736 men and 40,957 women. Notably, 2.3% of men and 4.2% of women had depression. Non-compliance with washing hands was significantly higher in men than women (1.3% vs. 0.9%), whereas no significant differences were observed in wearing masks and watching distance. The adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that depression was positively associated with non-compliance with washing hands and watching distance in both sexes. The association between depression and non-compliance with wearing masks was significant only in women. CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between depression and non-compliance with COVID-19 preventive behaviors in South Korean older adults. This signifies that health providers need to reduce depression to improve compliance with preventive behaviors in older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Male , Female , Humans , Aged , Depression/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Sexual Behavior , Patient Compliance , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
2.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 71(5): 2105-2108, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323554

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak on compliance to amblyopia therapy from the perspective of parents of amblyopic children. Methods: The participants for the qualitative study were enrolled from the medical records of a tertiary eye care center during the COVID-19 pandemic. The trained researcher conducted telephonic interviews consisting of validated 15 open-ended questions for 15 min. The questions were related to patients' compliance toward amblyopia treatment and the date of follow-up with their practitioners. The data collected were entered on Excel sheets in the participant's own words and later converted to a transcript for analysis. Results: A total of 217 parents of children with amblyopia who were due for follow-up were contacted through telephone. The response rate for willingness to participate was only 36% (n = 78). Of these, 76% (n = 59) of parents reported that their child was compliant toward the treatment during the therapy period and 69% reported that their child was currently not on treatment for amblyopia. Conclusion: In the current study, we have observed that although reported compliance by parents during the therapy period was good, around 69% of patients had discontinued amblyopia therapy. The main reason for the discontinuation of therapy was the failure to visit the hospital during the scheduled follow-up with the eye care practitioner.


Subject(s)
Amblyopia , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Amblyopia/epidemiology , Amblyopia/therapy , Visual Acuity , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Compliance , Tertiary Care Centers , Sensory Deprivation , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(19): e33716, 2023 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313152

ABSTRACT

It has been reported that during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, bronchiectasis patients were adversely affected due to their limited respiratory functions and acute exacerbations which were triggered by viral infections. The increased concern in the population during the pandemic has affected the attitudes of people toward avoiding disease and patients' treatment compliance. It is unclear whether treatment adherence and anxiety levels of bronchiectasis patients have changed during the pandemic. We aimed to evaluate treatment adherence and anxiety levels in patients with bronchiectasis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between May and November 2021. A total of 123 patients with bronchiectasis and 110 adults without chronic diseases were included in the control group. Patient demographic information, bronchiectasis follow-up data, and COVID-19 history were recorded. Then, patients filled out "MARS-5 Index" (Medical Adherence Report Scale-5), Beck Anxiety Scale and the Effect of Events Scale (IES-R). Responses of questionnaires were statistically analyzed. Our results showed that the majority of patients with bronchiectasis had high Medical Adherence Report Scale-5 index total scores during the COVID-19 pandemic (86.2%). The total scores on the Beck Anxiety Scale of bronchiectasis patients who did not have COVID-19 were significantly higher than those who had COVID-19 (P = .04). The total scores on the IES-R were found to be significantly higher in the control group (P < .001). No significant difference was found in the total scores on the Beck Anxiety Scale between the patients and the control group. The bronchiectasis patients had high adherence to their current treatment during the COVID-19 period and were less affected by the pandemic and its psychological effects compared to the healthy population. Furthermore, individuals diagnosed with bronchiectasis who were not infected with COVID-19 demonstrated increased levels of anxiety compared to those who were infected with COVID-19 which may be due to their concern about contracting the disease.


Subject(s)
Bronchiectasis , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Patient Compliance , Bronchiectasis/complications , Bronchiectasis/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
4.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 751, 2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is vital for individuals to comply with the government's prevention and control measures. This study aims to explore determinants of college students' compliance behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This study conducted an online survey among 3,122 individuals aged 18 and above from March to November 2022 in China. Individuals' compliance behaviour was divided into protective behaviour (that includes wearing a mask, maintaining a physical distance, and getting vaccinated) and restrictive behaviour (that includes offering health codes and a nucleic acid test certificate). Individuals' compliance motivation was divided into calculated motivation (including the fear of being infected, the fear of being published, and previous experience of pandemic prevention) and normative motivation (including the sense of social responsibility and trust in government). We defined young people aged between 18 and 24 with a college degree as young elites, and constructed ordinary least squares linear regression to compare their compliance behaviour with young people without a college degree (young non-elites), and non-young people with a college degree (non-young elites). RESULTS: Almost three years after the outbreak of the pandemic, Chinese individuals retained a high degree of compliance with COVID-19 prevention and control policies, particularly with respect to the provision of health codes. Young elites were more compliant with getting vaccinated, wearing a mask, providing health codes and testing results than their counterparts. The sense of social responsibility and trust in government were the major drivers of young elites' compliance behaviour during the pandemic. Young elites who were male, had a rural "hukou", and were not a member of the China Communist Party were more compliant with COVID-19 prevention and control measures. CONCLUSION: This study found that young elites in China had high policy compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic. These young elites' compliance behaviour was driven by their sense of social responsibility and trust in government rather than the fear of being infected and the fear of being punished as a result of violating the regulations. We suggest that in the context of managing health crises, in stead of introducing punitive measures to enforce citizens to comply with the management measures, promoting citizens' sense of social responsibility and building a trusting relationship with citizens contrite to the enhancement of citizens' policy compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Patient Compliance , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , East Asian People , Motivation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(5): 296, 2023 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295464

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Motivation to treat cancer and prevent its negative impact has been largely explored in a non-pandemic context. However, little is known about the motivation to comply with the treatment, especially during a pandemic. To fill this gap, we have explored the individual and contextual factors impacting patients' motivation during the COVID-19 period using the integrated model. METHODS: We have conducted two qualitative studies before (study 1) and during the COVID-19 (study 2) period in a cancer centre. We respectively interviewed 30 and 22 patients with various chronic cancers in study 1 and also with COVID-19 in study 2. Data analysis was based on content analysis and grounded theory approach identifying the factors affecting patient motivations during both periods, and then comparing them. RESULTS: Our results show the mechanisms that allow patients to maintain their motivation despite the threats related to COVID-19. They underline the importance of respecting the rules and laws for patients' motivation. CONCLUSION: Compliance with legislation fuels the psychological need of protection in patients, which is a key determinant of motivation in the context of the pandemic. Considering patients' self-regulatory activities to assess motivational factors, going beyond clinical aspects, to include organisational and quality-of-life-related aspects throughout their care pathway is crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Motivation , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Compliance , Quality of Life/psychology
6.
Med Care ; 61(Suppl 1): S30-S38, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: In recent years, 2 circumstances have changed provider-patient interactions in ambulatory care: (1) the replacement of virtual for in-person visits and (2) the COVID-19 pandemic. We studied the potential impact of each event on provider practice and patient adherence by comparing the frequency of the association of provider orders, and patient fulfillment of those orders, by visit mode and pandemic period, for incident neck or back pain (NBP) visits in ambulatory care. METHODS: Data were extracted from the electronic health records of 3 Kaiser Permanente regions (Colorado, Georgia, and Mid-Atlantic States) from January 2017 to June 2021. Incident NBP visits were defined from ICD-10 coded as primary or first listed diagnoses on adult, family medicine, or urgent care visits separated by at least 180 days. Visit modes were classified as virtual or in-person. Periods were classified as prepandemic (before April 2020 or the beginning of the national emergency) or recovery (after June 2020). Percentages of provider orders for, and patient fulfillment of orders, were measured for 5 service classes and compared on: virtual versus in-person visits, and prepandemic versus recovery periods. Comparisons were balanced on patient case-mix using inverse probability of treatment weighting. RESULTS: Ancillary services in all 5 categories at each of the 3 Kaiser Permanente regions were substantially ordered less frequently on virtual compared with in-person visits in both the prepandemic and recovery periods (both P ≤ 0.001). Conditional on an order, patient fulfillment within 30 days was high (typically ≥70%) and not likely meaningfully different between visit modes or pandemic periods. CONCLUSIONS: Ancillary services for incident NBP visits were ordered less frequently during virtual than in-person visits in both prepandemic and recovery periods. Patient fulfillment of orders was high, and not significantly different by mode or period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Back Pain/therapy , Ambulatory Care , Patient Compliance
7.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 189, 2023 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People often feel urges to engage in activities that violate pandemic public health guidelines. Research on these urges has been reliant on measures of typical behaviour, which fail to capture these urges as they unfold. Guideline adherence could be improved through interventions, but few methods allow for ecologically valid observation of the range of behaviours that pandemic guidelines prescribe. METHODS: In this preregistered parallel randomised trial, 95 participants aged 18-65 from the UK were assigned to three groups using blinded block randomisation, and engaged in episodic future thinking (n = 33), compassion exercises (n = 31), or a control procedure (n = 31). Following an ecological momentary assessment procedure, participants report on the intensity of their occurrent urges (min. 1, max. 10) and their ability to control them. The study further investigates whether, and through which mechanism, state impulsivity and vaccine attitudes affect guideline adherence. RESULTS: Episodic future thinking (b = -1.80) and compassion exercises (b = -1.45) reduced the intensity of urges. State impulsivity is associated with stronger urges, but we found no evidence that vaccine hesitancy predicts lesser self-control. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that episodic future thinking exercises and compassion training may be used to decrease non-compliance urges of individuals who are an acute public health risk for the community, such as those in voluntary isolation.


Subject(s)
Empathy , Public Health , Humans , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Patient Compliance
8.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(3): e231587, 2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268580

ABSTRACT

This survey study assesses whether parents had ever engaged in specific misrepresentation and nonadherence behaviors regarding public health measures for preventing COVID-19 transmission among children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parents , Patient Compliance , Child , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control
10.
J Community Psychol ; 51(3): 1408-1426, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2235981

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to examine whether the way one copes with stressful situations, as measured by John Henryism Active Coping (JHAC), influences behavioral responses to the pandemic, such as whether they engaged in mask wearing, social distancing, and hand washing. The data for this study come from the 2020 Blair Center Poll, which was conducted by the Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society at the University of Arkansas. Results show that high JHAC had a significant effect on COVID-19 policy compliance. Additionally, there was an interaction effect between JHAC and race on COVID-19 policy compliance. This effect was significant for only African Americans and Hispanics-not Whites. In other words, among African Americans and Hispanics, high JHAC had a significant effect on their compliance with COVID-19 policies. These findings suggest that coping structures policy compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adaptation, Psychological , Black or African American , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hispanic or Latino , Pandemics , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data
11.
J Health Commun ; 27(10): 764-775, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2166084

ABSTRACT

The media are important information disseminators in society. Particularly in uncertain times, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, citizens are very "media dependent." The way in which people are informed about the coronavirus heavily depends on the type of media they use. Especially on social media, the share of misinformation is considerable, which might impact the way in which people comply with preventive measures. Our study investigates how media use affects misperceptions about the coronavirus and whether this influences important behavioral determinants as well as compliance behavior itself. The results of a unique 5-wave panel survey (N = 1,741) conducted between April 2020 and October 2020 show that the use of mass media reduces misperceptions. The same was found for Twitter users, whereas Facebook and Instagram users have more misperceptions about the coronavirus. Misperceptions negatively influence the perceived severity, susceptibility and efficacy of preventive measures taken by governments, which may ultimately result in decreased compliance. Our findings underline the important role of media consumption and misperceptions in shaping citizens' beliefs and behavior regarding COVID-19. They re-emphasize the importance of mass media, such as newspapers, television broadcasts or reliable news websites, to inform the public about current affairs. They also imply that platform media might be more heterogeneous in their effects than mass media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mass Media , Social Media , Humans , Communication , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Compliance , Health Behavior
12.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 90(2): 811-822, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent innovative non-pharmacological interventions and neurostimulation devices have shown potential for application in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These include photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy. OBJECTIVE: This pilot study assesses the safety, compliance with, and efficacy of a brain-gut PBM therapy for mild-to-moderate AD patients. METHODS: This double-blind, randomized, monocentric sham-controlled study started in 2018 and ended prematurely in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Fifty-three mild-to-moderate AD patients were randomized, 27 in the PBM group and 26 in the sham group. All patients had 40 treatment sessions lasting 25 min each over 8 weeks and were followed for 4 weeks afterwards. Compliance with the treatment was recorded. Safety was assessed by recording adverse events (AEs), and efficacy was evaluated using neuropsychological tests. RESULTS: The PBM therapy proved to be safe in regard to the number of recorded AEs (44% of the patients), which were balanced between the PBM and sham groups. AEs were mainly mild, and no serious AEs were reported. The majority of the patients (92.5%) were highly compliant, which confirms the feasibility of the PBM treatment. Compared to the sham patients, the PBM patients showed lower ADAS-Cog comprehension subscores, higher forward verbal spans, and lower TMT-B execution times, which suggests an improvement in cognitive functions. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the tolerability of and patient compliance with a PBM-based treatment for mild-to-moderate AD patients. It highlights encouraging efficacy trends and provides insights for the design of the next phase trial in a larger AD patient sample.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Low-Level Light Therapy , Humans , Pilot Projects , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome , Alzheimer Disease/radiotherapy , Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy , Brain , Double-Blind Method , Patient Compliance
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e059813, 2022 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078962

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Shielding aimed to protect those predicted to be at highest risk from COVID-19 and was uniquely implemented in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinically extremely vulnerable people identified through algorithms and screening of routine National Health Service (NHS) data were individually and strongly advised to stay at home and strictly self-isolate even from others in their household. This study will generate a logic model of the intervention and evaluate the effects and costs of shielding to inform policy development and delivery during future pandemics. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a quasiexperimental study undertaken in Wales where records for people who were identified for shielding were already anonymously linked into integrated data systems for public health decision-making. We will: interview policy-makers to understand rationale for shielding advice to inform analysis and interpretation of results; use anonymised individual-level data to select people identified for shielding advice in March 2020 and a matched cohort, from routine electronic health data sources, to compare outcomes; survey a stratified random sample of each group about activities and quality of life at 12 months; use routine and newly collected blood data to assess immunity; interview people who were identified for shielding and their carers and NHS staff who delivered healthcare during shielding, to explore compliance and experiences; collect healthcare resource use data to calculate implementation costs and cost-consequences. Our team includes people who were shielding, who used their experience to help design and deliver this study. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received approval from the Newcastle North Tyneside 2 Research Ethics Committee (IRAS 295050). We will disseminate results directly to UK government policy-makers, publish in peer-reviewed journals, present at scientific and policy conferences and share accessible summaries of results online and through public and patient networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , State Medicine , Humans , Wales , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Patient Compliance
14.
Health Soc Care Community ; 30(5): e2255-e2263, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001638

ABSTRACT

Patients who miss scheduled appointments reduce clinical productivity and delay access to care for other patients. Reminders have improved attendance for healthcare appointments previously, but it is not known if short message service (SMS) implementation reduces incidence of patients unable to attend (UTA) or who fail to attend (FTA) appointments in the public dental service. This paper studied the effectiveness of SMS reminders in increasing appointment attendance at outpatient public dental services in Queensland. Data were sourced from the adult service and the children and adolescent oral health service (CAOHS) at West Moreton Hospital and Health Service, a public dental service in Queensland. A total of 63,238 appointments pre-implementation of SMS reminders and 55,028 appointments post-implementation over a period of 2 years were analysed for rates of attendance, UTA and FTA. Characteristics of UTA and FTA appointments were analysed to identify factors that hindered improvement after implementation of reminders. For the CAOHS, the attendance rate decreased 4% (95% CI: 2%, 6%) following SMS implementation. The UTA rate also increased by 20% (95% CI: 15%, 25%). Following SMS implementation in the adult service, the attendance rate increased from 73.5 (95% CI: 72.6, 74.4) to 77.7 (95% CI: 76.6-78.8) per 100 appointments. The FTA rate post-implementation was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.16) times that from pre-intervention, and the UTA rate decreased from 21.7 (95% CI: 21.2, 22.2) to 17.1 (95% CI: 16.6, 17.7) per 100 appointments. The SMS reminders had a mixed effect on the attendance, UTA and FTA rates for the CAOHS and adult services. Reminders reduced the rates of UTA for the CAOHS service and increased the rate of attendance for the adult service. There was an increase in the FTA rate for both services.


Subject(s)
Outpatients , Reminder Systems , Adolescent , Adult , Appointments and Schedules , Child , Dental Care , Humans , Patient Compliance , Retrospective Studies
15.
Prim Care Diabetes ; 16(5): 658-663, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983798

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study was carried out to investigate fear levels, treatment compliance, and metabolic control of type II Diabetes Mellitus patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study employed a single-center, observational design and was conducted between January and April 2021. The study consisted of 303 patients who attended the internal medicine outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Turkey. For data collection, the Patient Identification Form, COVID-19 Fear Scale, and the Type II Diabetes Treatment Compliance Scale were used. The study complied with the Helsinki Declaration criteria. IBM SPSS v25.0 statistics package program was used for data analysis. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 45.8 ± 7.5 years, the mean duration of illness was 8.2 ± 3.6 years. Moreover, 40.6% of patients presented with poor levels of treatment compliance. In addition, the mean FCV-19S score of the patients was 29.1 ± 3.05. It was noticeable that those with high mean scores of FCV-19S had poor compliance with treatment and metabolic control during the pandemic (p < 0.05). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Fear of COVID-19 negatively affects treatment compliance and metabolic control of type II diabetes patients. The patients avoided attending their regular follow-ups at the hospital due to fear of contracting COVID-19. In order to reduce the fear of COVID-19 it is paramount to maintain optimum metabolic control and treatment compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance
17.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 284, 2022 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is rapidly changed medical habits, and dental clinics have been forced to adapt. This study explored the pandemic-induced changes in patient utilization of dental services to assist practitioners in responding efficiently to similar public crises as references in the future. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the correlation between patient profiles and dental visits attendance within 2 months before and during the outbreak. RESULTS: A total of 332 patients, 210 women and 122 men (total number of visits: 1068) were enrolled in this study. A significantly lower attendance rate was noted during the COVID-19 period (70.3%) than prior to the pandemic (83.4%). The rate of return visits for patients with a high education level during the COVID-19 period was significantly reduced from 96.5 to 93.1%. In addition, the number of days between two visits significantly increased during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that, during the pandemic period, the attendance rates of return dental appointments decreased, and the rate of missed appointments for patients with a high educational levels was higher than that of patients with a low educational level. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Preventive management of these patients who are easy to miss dental appointments may enable more effective use of medical resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Appointments and Schedules , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Compliance , Retrospective Studies
18.
South Med J ; 115(7): 420-421, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903946

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Compliance with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) guidelines, including the use of masks and social distancing and vaccinations, has been poor. Our study examined what factors may identify those who will be more or less compliant, especially in regard to those with identified higher risk. METHODS: A telephone survey of 200 adult patients from two practices, one general internal medicine and the other rheumatology, was performed in May and June 2021. Questions included age, sex, perception of immunocompetence, smoking history, mask and social distancing compliance, COVID-19 symptoms and/or test-proven infection, and immunization status for COVID-19. Those agreeing to participate also underwent chart review for body mass index, physician-assessed immunocompetence, and diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: No clinical factors approached statistical significance for the prediction of compliance or noncompliance. Compliance with mask and social distancing highly correlated with vaccination and avoidance of infection, however. CONCLUSIONS: Attempts to improve compliance cannot be focused on any of the particular groups examined in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Adult , Appalachian Region , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Patient Compliance , Vaccination
19.
Ther Apher Dial ; 26(5): 977-982, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883160

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It is aimed in this study to evaluate the relationship between COVID-19 anxiety and treatment compliance in hemodialysis patients. METHODS: This study was conducted descriptively with 128 hemodialysis patients treated in the hemodialysis unit of a district state hospital between September and December 2021. RESULTS: It was observed that there was a significant relationship between the dialysis duration as well as the variable of forgetting to take their medicines while traveling and the coronavirus anxiety scores according to the multiple regression analysis regarding the variables affecting the coronavirus anxiety levels of the participants, and that these two variables were 25% determinant in the mean score of the coronavirus anxiety (R2  = 0.25, p = 0.00). CONCLUSION: It was found, as a conclusion, that the majority of the patients were compliant to the treatment and such variables as gender, education, profession, and dialysis duration were related to the coronavirus anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renal Dialysis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Patient Compliance , Prospective Studies
20.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 40: 84-90, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850645

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the effect of health anxiety experienced by elderly individuals during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on their disease perception and treatment compliance. DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted between November 2020 and March 2021. The research data was collected using the Patient Information Form, Health Anxiety Scale (HAS), Disease Perception Scale-Short Form (DPS-SF) and Turkish Modified Morisky Treatment Compliance Scale (MMTCS). RESULTS: Of the 401 study participants, 63.1% were in the 65-69 years age group. The mean HAS, DPS-SF and MMTCS motivation and knowledge level sub-dimension scores of the participants were 18.73 ± 8.87, 54.24 ± 9.98, 1.28 ± 0.74 and 2.04 ± 0.92, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study showed that the health anxiety and disease perception scores were high among elderly individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic, which hindered their treatment compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Patient Compliance , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
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