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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264655, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Isolation is an indispensable measure to contain the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but it may have a negative impact on mental health and overall wellbeing. Evidence on the isolation experience, facilitating and complicating factors is needed to mitigate negative effects. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This observational, population-based cohort study enrolled 1547 adults from the general population with SARS-CoV-2 infection reported to authorities between 27 February 2020 and 19 January 2021 in Zurich, Switzerland. We assessed the proportion of individuals reporting symptoms of depression and anxiety before, during and after isolation (by DASS-21), and queried worries, positive experiences, and difficulties. We analyzed the association of these outcomes with socio-demographics using ordinal regression. Additionally, we report free-text statements by participants to capture most important aspects of isolation. The proportion of participants affected by depression or anxiety increased during isolation from 10·0% to 17·1% and 9·1% to 17·6%, respectively. Ordinal regression showed that taking care of children increased the difficulty of isolation (OR 2·10, CI 1·43-3·08) and risk of non-compliance (OR 1·63, CI 1·05-2·53), especially in younger participants. A facilitating factor that individuals commonly expressed was receiving more support during isolation. CONCLUSION: Isolation due to SARS-CoV-2 presents a mental burden, especially for younger individuals and those taking care of children. Public health authorities need to train personnel and draw from community-based resources to provide targeted support, information, and guidance to individuals during isolation. Such efforts could alleviate the negative impact isolation has on the mental and physical health of individuals and ensure compliance of the population with recommendations.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Cohort Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Regression Analysis , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265014, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742017

ABSTRACT

The objective of this research was to examine residents' awareness, attitudes, and compliance with COVID-19 public health guidelines in Vermont, which emerged as an early leader in national pandemic response. Our methods included conducting an online survey of adult Vermont residents between January and April 2021. We analyzed demographics associated with awareness and compliance, and identified features associated with non-compliance. Our results show that of the 2,208 adult Vermont residents who completed the survey, 90% were extremely aware of the state's COVID-19 guidelines, and 95% reported knowing exactly what to do to follow recommended actions. Political affiliation emerged as a primary factor related to attitudes and compliance. Self-identified Republicans were less likely to agree that public health measures keep people safe or help businesses stay open, and were less likely to follow masking, quarantine, social distancing, and vaccine guidance than Independents, Progressives, and Democrats. The large differences in COVID-19 infection and death rates across the country, and recent shift toward a "pandemic of the unvaccinated," underscore the need for identifying public health strategies that work in some areas in order to adapt and apply them to areas that have struggled with controlling the virus. Consistent with national surveys, our results show that resistance to public health guidance is a partisan challenge even in states with high compliance. Identifying populations that are less supportive or hesitant to follow guidelines while understanding factors that motivate compliance can help inform strategies for developing targeted programs to encourage collective action on pandemic response. Developing communication strategies that reach people who do not believe COVID-19 guidelines keep them safe is necessary to reach universal compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Adult , Aged , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vermont/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264237, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes more than five million deaths worldwide. Pregnant women are at high risk for infection due to the physiologic change in the immune and cardiopulmonary system and also it increases the risk of severe disease, intensive care unit admission, and receive mechanical ventilation when compared with non-pregnant women. It is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. So pregnant women need to have adhered to preventive measures to prevent COVID-19 related consequences. Therefore, this study aimed to assess adherence toCOVID-19 preventive practice and associated factors among pregnant women in Gondar city, northwest Ethiopia. METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from July 1st to 30th, 2021, in Gondar city. A cluster sampling technique was employed to select 678 pregnant women. Data were collected using a pre-tested, face-to-face interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data were entered into EPI DATA version 4.6 and exported to SPSS version 25 for analysis. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to identify associated factors. Adjusted odds ratio with a 95% confidence interval was used to report the association between covariates and the outcome variable. RESULTS: The prevalence of good adherence to COVID-19 preventive practice was 44.8% (95% CI: 41.3, 48.7). Maternal age (≤24 years) [AOR = 2.89, 95% CI: 1.37, 6.10], maternal education (secondary school) [AOR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.58, 5.53] and (college and above) [AOR = 4.57,95% CI: 2.42, 8.62], having ANC follow up [AOR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.35, 6.46] and adequate knowledge towards COVID-19 [AOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.20, 2.41] were significantly associated with good adherence to COVID-19 preventive practice. CONCLUSION: In this study, adherence towards COVID-19 preventive practice in pregnant women is low. Hence, it is important to strengthen women's awareness about COVID-19 through different media and health education. In addition, empowering women to attain ANC and special consideration should be given to women who had no formal education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Primary Prevention/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cities , Community-Based Participatory Research , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Maternal Age , Pregnancy , Primary Prevention/education , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 169-178, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591240

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To assess the association between individual-level adherence to social-distancing and personal hygiene behaviors recommended by public health experts and subsequent risk of COVID-19 diagnosis in the United States. Methods. Data are from waves 7 through 26 (June 10, 2020-April 26, 2021) of the Understanding America Study COVID-19 survey. We used Cox models to assess the relationship between engaging in behaviors considered high risk and risk of COVID-19 diagnosis. Results. Individuals engaging in behaviors indicating lack of adherence to social-distancing guidelines, especially those related to large gatherings or public interactions, had a significantly higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis than did those who did not engage in these behaviors. Each additional risk behavior was associated with a 9% higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05, 1.13). Results were similar after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and local infection rates. Conclusions. Personal mitigation behaviors appear to influence the risk of COVID-19, even in the presence of social factors related to infection risk. Public Health Implications. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual behaviors for preventing COVID-19, which may be relevant in contexts with low vaccination. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):169-178. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306565).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Risk Behaviors , Hygiene , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
6.
Sci Prog ; 104(3): 368504211042980, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the truthfulness of patients about their pre-appointment COVID-19 screening tests at a dental clinic. METHODS: A total of 613 patients were recruited for the study from the dental clinic at the Faculty of Dentistry, Najran University, Saudi Arabia. The data collection was done in three parts from the patients who visited the hospital to receive dental treatment. The first part included the socio-demographic characteristics of the patients and the COVID-19 swab tests performed within the past 14 days. The second part was the clinical examination, and the third part was a confirmation of the swab test taken by the patient by checking the Hesen website using the patient ID. After data collection, statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 26.0. Descriptive analysis was done and expressed as mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentage (%). A cross-tabulation, also described as a contingency table, was used to identify trends and patterns across data and explain the correlation between different variables. RESULTS: It was seen from the status of the swab test within 14 days of the patient's arrival at the hospital for the dental treatment that 18 (2.9%) patients lied about the pre-treatment swab test within 14 days, and 595 (97.1%) were truthful. The observed and expected counts showed across genders and diagnosis a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001), and there was no significant difference seen across different age groups (p = 0.064) of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dental healthcare workers are worried and assume a high risk of COVID-19 infection as the patients are not truthful about the pre-treatment COVID-19 swab test. Routine rapid tests on patients and the healthcare staff are a feasible option for lowering overall risks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Truth Disclosure/ethics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Dental Offices/ethics , Dental Offices/organization & administration , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Patient Compliance/psychology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 716814, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369739

ABSTRACT

Regardless of the advocacies made by the media and numerous organizations about the need for preventing the spread of COVID-19, there still exists a gap as far as compliance to regular implementation of the preventive mechanisms within communities is concerned. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to examine compliance to personal protective behavioral recommendations to contain the spread of COVID-19 among urban residents engaged in the informal economic activities in Wolaita Sodo town, Southern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design was used where quantitative data were collected through the survey research method. Three hundred and eighty-four participants of the urban-based informal economy were randomly selected and contacted in their own natural settings with an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data were inserted into SPSS software for analysis that involved both descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency and percentage distributions, binomial and multinomial logistic regressions. The results of the research indicated that only 35.4% of the respondents regularly wore a mask. In addition, 54.9% of the survey participants disclosed that they do not clean their hands with disinfectants after touching objects under circumstances where they cannot get access to water and soap. Moreover, the most commonly reported reason of respondents for non-compliance to regular wearing of a mask has been its inconvenience or discomfort (62.8%), followed by the need to appear indifferent because most people around them do not wear a mask (25.2%). Furthermore, experiences of the respondents of regularly wearing a mask are significantly associated with regular attendance of the media regarding the preventive mechanisms of COVID-19 (OR = 0.224; P < 0.001; 95%C.I: 0.109-0.460), knowledge of someone ever infected by COVID-19 (OR = 0.402; P < 0.05; 95%C.I: 0.190-0.851), the belief that COVID-19 causes a severe illness (OR = 0.444; P < 0.05; 95%C.I: 0.201-0.980), and perception of the likelihood of dying as a result of infection by COVID-19 (OR = 0.374; P < 0.01; 95% C.I: 0.197-0.711). The authors have found a low level of compliance to the recommended safety measures, especially wearing of masks. It is, therefore, important that continued efforts of raising awareness should be done by all the concerned bodies. Above all, urban safety net programs that aim at keeping such social groups at home, at least during the critical wave of the pandemic, should also be strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Humans
9.
Am J Nurs ; 121(6): 14, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322668
10.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254456, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309962

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccination programs aim to control the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the relative impacts of vaccine coverage, effectiveness, and capacity in the context of nonpharmaceutical interventions such as mask use and physical distancing on the spread of SARS-CoV-2 are unclear. Our objective was to examine the impact of vaccination on the control of SARS-CoV-2 using our previously developed agent-based simulation model. METHODS: We applied our agent-based model to replicate COVID-19-related events in 1) Dane County, Wisconsin; 2) Milwaukee metropolitan area, Wisconsin; 3) New York City (NYC). We evaluated the impact of vaccination considering the proportion of the population vaccinated, probability that a vaccinated individual gains immunity, vaccination capacity, and adherence to nonpharmaceutical interventions. We estimated the timing of pandemic control, defined as the date after which only a small number of new cases occur. RESULTS: The timing of pandemic control depends highly on vaccination coverage, effectiveness, and adherence to nonpharmaceutical interventions. In Dane County and Milwaukee, if 50% of the population is vaccinated with a daily vaccination capacity of 0.25% of the population, vaccine effectiveness of 90%, and the adherence to nonpharmaceutical interventions is 60%, controlled spread could be achieved by June 2021 versus October 2021 in Dane County and November 2021 in Milwaukee without vaccine. DISCUSSION: In controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the impact of vaccination varies widely depending not only on effectiveness and coverage, but also concurrent adherence to nonpharmaceutical interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation , Humans , Masks , Physical Distancing , Respiratory Protective Devices/statistics & numerical data , United States , Urban Health
11.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256618

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been present for many months, influencing diets such as the gluten-free diet (GFD), which implies daily challenges even in non-pandemic conditions. Persons following the GFD were invited to answer online ad hoc and validated questionnaires characterizing self-perceptions of the pandemic, current clinical condition, dietary characteristics, adherence to GFD, anxiety, and depression. Of 331 participants, 87% experienced shortage and higher cost of food and 14.8% lost their jobs. Symptoms increased in 29% and 36.6% failed to obtain medical help. Although 52.3% increased food preparation at home and purchased alternative foodstuffs, 53.8% had consumed gluten-containing foods. The Health Eating Index was intermediate/"needs improvement" (mean 65.6 ± 13.3 points); in 49.9% (perception) and 44.4% (questionnaire), adherence was "bad". Anxiety and depression scores were above the cutoff in 28% and 40.4%, respectively. Adherence and mental health were strongly related. The likelihood of poor adherence was 2.3 times higher (p < 0.004) in participants declaring that pandemic altered GFD. Those suffering depressive symptoms were 1.3 times more likely to have poor adherence (p < 0.000). Depression and faulty GFD (mandatory for treatment) appear, affecting a high proportion of participants, suggesting that support measures aimed at these aspects would help improve the health condition of people that maintain GFD. Comparisons of data currently appearing in the literature available should be cautious because not only cultural aspects but conditions and timing of data collection are most variable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Celiac Disease/psychology , Diet, Gluten-Free/psychology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Celiac Disease/diet therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Diet, Gluten-Free/statistics & numerical data , Diet, Healthy , Female , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251362, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223801

ABSTRACT

The NHS 111 telephone advice and triage service is a vital part of the management of urgent and emergency care (UEC) services in England. Demand for NHS 111 advice has increased since its introduction in 2013, and the service is of particular importance in light of the current pandemic and resulting increased demand for emergency care. Currently, little is known about the effectiveness of NHS 111 in terms of the appropriateness of the advice given, or about the compliance of patients with that advice. We aimed to address this issue by analysing a large linked routine dataset of all NHS 111 calls (n = 3,631,069) and subsequent emergency department (ED) attendances made in the Yorkshire & Humber region from March 2013-March 2017. We found that many patients do not comply with advice, with 11% (n = 289,748) of patients attending ED when they are advised to self-care or seek primary care. We also found that a considerable number of these patients are further classed as urgent (88%, n = 255,931) and a substantial minority (37%, 106,207) are subsequently admitted to hospital. Further, many patients who are sent an ambulance or told to attend ED are classed as non-urgent upon attending ED (9%, n = 42,372). This research suggests that the level at which NHS 111 is currently triaging results in many hundreds of thousands of mis-triaged cases annually. Additionally, patients frequently do not comply with the advice they receive. This has implications for understanding the accuracy and efficiency of triaging systems.


Subject(s)
Hotlines/methods , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Triage/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , England , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Young Adult
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e28973, 2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207686

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization's Emergency Committee declared the rapid, worldwide spread of COVID-19 a global health emergency. Since then, tireless efforts have been made to mitigate the spread of the disease and its impact, and these efforts have mostly relied on nonpharmaceutical interventions. By December 2020, the safety and efficacy of the first COVID-19 vaccines were demonstrated. The large social media platform Twitter has been used by medical researchers for the analysis of important public health topics, such as the public's perception on antibiotic use and misuse and human papillomavirus vaccination. The analysis of Twitter-generated data can be further facilitated by using Twitter's built-in, anonymous polling tool to gain insight into public health issues and obtain rapid feedback on an international scale. During the fast-paced course of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Twitter polling system has provided a viable method for gaining rapid, large-scale, international public health insights on highly relevant and timely SARS-CoV-2-related topics. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to understand the public's perception on the safety and acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines in real time by using Twitter polls. METHODS: We developed 2 Twitter polls to explore the public's views on available COVID-19 vaccines. The surveys were pinned to the Digital Health and Patient Safety Platform Twitter timeline for 1 week in mid-February 2021, and Twitter users and influencers were asked to participate in and retweet the polls to reach the largest possible audience. RESULTS: The adequacy of COVID-19 vaccine safety (ie, the safety of currently available vaccines; poll 1) was agreed upon by 1579 out of 3439 (45.9%) Twitter users. In contrast, almost as many Twitter users (1434/3439, 41.7%) were unsure about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. Only 5.2% (179/3439) of Twitter users rated the available COVID-19 vaccines as generally unsafe. Poll 2, which addressed the question of whether users would undergo vaccination, was answered affirmatively by 82.8% (2862/3457) of Twitter users, and only 8% (277/3457) categorically rejected vaccination at the time of polling. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to the perceived high level of uncertainty about the safety of the available COVID-19 vaccines, we observed an elevated willingness to undergo vaccination among our study sample. Since people's perceptions and views are strongly influenced by social media, the snapshots provided by these media platforms represent a static image of a moving target. Thus, the results of this study need to be followed up by long-term surveys to maintain their validity. This is especially relevant due to the circumstances of the fast-paced pandemic and the need to not miss sudden rises in the incidence of vaccine hesitancy, which may have detrimental effects on the pandemic's course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol ; 182(7): 631-636, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, and venom allergy. Compliance is essential for SCIT to obtain maximal benefit as it is a long-term treatment. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the level of real-life SCIT compliance in pediatric patients and the associated factors. Additional aims were to determine how SCIT compliance was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and why some patients dropped out SCIT. METHOD: Pediatric patients diagnosed with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, or venom allergy that received SCIT between September 2012 and July 2020 were analyzed. RESULTS: The study included 201 children (66.7% male) with a median (interquartile range) age of 12.8 years (9.4-15.2) at the time of the first SCIT injection. The overall compliance rate before COVID-19 pandemic was 86.1%. Short SCIT follow-up time and venom anaphylaxis were found to be risk factors for drop out. The leading causes of drop outs were moving to another city/country (32.1%), symptom improvement (17.8%), treatment ineffectiveness (14.2%), and adverse reactions (14.2%). Among the 108 patients that were still receiving SCIT during the COVID-19 pandemic, 31 (28.7%) dropped out the therapy. The most frequent reasons for drop-out were fear of being infected with COVID-19 (35.4%) and thinking that the AIT practise stopped due to COVID-19 pandemic (29%). Male gender and older age were found to be the independent risk factors for drop-out of SCIT. CONCLUSIONS: Real life compliance in children was found 13.9% and it was higher than adults. Nearly one-third of children dropped out during the CO-VID-19 pandemic. Male gender and older age are associated with SCIT drop-out during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Desensitization, Immunologic , Hypersensitivity, Immediate/therapy , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Desensitization, Immunologic/adverse effects , Desensitization, Immunologic/methods , Desensitization, Immunologic/psychology , Desensitization, Immunologic/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Injections, Subcutaneous , Logistic Models , Male , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Dropouts/psychology , Patient Dropouts/statistics & numerical data , Turkey
16.
Future Oncol ; 17(20): 2621-2629, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195990

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the impact of coronaphobia on treatment and follow-up compliance in cancer patients. The records of 230 cancer patients were reviewed. Coronaphobia was assessed via the validated COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S). A total of 64% of the patients had a high coronaphobia score. Among them, 59% were noncompliant. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, low educational status, treatment type, following COVID-19 news, having knowledge about COVID-19 transmission and higher C19P-S score were associated with noncompliance (p = 0.006, p < 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that having knowledge about COVID-19 transmission was related to a higher C19P-S score (p = 0.001). The cancer patients studied had significant coronaphobia. Moreover, greater coronaphobia was significantly associated with noncompliance with follow-up and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychometrics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e048001, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has placed unprecedented restrictions on people's lives and routines. To counteract the exponential spread of this virus, a lockdown was implemented in Germany in March 2020. Infected persons and their contacts were also quarantined. Compliance with quarantine measures is essential for containing the spread of the virus and avoiding incalculable consequences in terms of morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, prolonged homestays, particularly quarantining, may lead to fear, panic, anxiety and depression. Hence, determining the psychological response in people during quarantine and their coping strategies is relevant for the counselling and support of affected persons by healthcare workers. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The CoCo-Fakt-Survey (Cologne-Corona-Beratung und Unterstützung Für Index- und KontAKt-Personen während der Quarantäne-ZeiT; Cologne-Corona counselling and support for index and contacts during the quarantine period-author's translation) will examine a cohort of persons in Cologne quarantined since the beginning of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak during March 2020. The questionnaire will include demographic data, transmission route, health status, knowledge of and adherence to quarantine measurements, psychological impact on individuals and their family members including children, mental health status, and lifestyle (physical activity/sedentary behaviour, relaxation techniques, nutrition, smoking). All Cologne residents who needed to be quarantined due to a coronavirus infection and the individuals with whom they had contact will be surveyed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No risks have been identified and no complications are expected. Ethics approval was obtained from the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen Human Ethics Research Committee (351/20), and the research will be conducted in accordance with the approved protocol. The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and social medicine conferences.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Life Style , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Germany , Humans , Research Design , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Scand J Gastroenterol ; 56(5): 545-551, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have experienced changes to the routine management because of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The aim of this study was to examine patients with IBD's adherence to the restrictions imposed by society and the hospital, worries and concerns regarding medical treatment and clinical follow-up under the pandemic. METHODS: IBD patients (≥18 years) at the outpatient clinic at Oslo University Hospital were included and answered a self-report questionnaire including concerns regarding their disease, medical therapy and follow-up during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: In total, 522 IBD patients were included, 317 Crohn's disease, 205 ulcerative colitis, 386 patients <50 years. Eighteen percent were in obligatory quarantine, and more often patients <50 years compared to patients ≥50 years. Five patients tested positive to SARS- CoV-2. A higher proportion <50 years reported worries for their medical treatment and risk of COVID -19 disease compared to those ≥50 years. Forty percent avoided family, two-thirds avoided friends, and 4% cancelled their scheduled consultation at the hospital. The hospital changed physical consultation to telephone consultation for 15% of the patients. The preferred follow-up was physical consultation. A higher proportion of the patients <50 years preferred telephone consultation compared to those ≥50 years. Four out of five IBD patients were satisfied with the information about their IBD and COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affects the daily lives for patients with IBD. It is important to develop evidence-base guidelines in follow-up and treatment, as well as patient information about COVID-19and IBD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Patient Compliance , Patient Preference , Adult , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/epidemiology , Colitis, Ulcerative/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Crohn Disease/drug therapy , Crohn Disease/epidemiology , Crohn Disease/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
19.
Minerva Surg ; 76(1): 57-61, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity represents a risk factor for COVID-19 infection. Therefore, in order to reduce COVID-19 related comorbidities in obese population a continuation of obesity treatment is needed. However, bariatric procedures were postponed because of COVID-19 restrictions, delaying treatment for obese patients seeking for surgery. This study aimed to test the feasibility of a telematics pre-operative psychological and nutritional assessment as an alternative tool during COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: Twenty-six patients were contacted. The pre-operative assessment consisted in 3-weekly one-to-one online sessions and a final in-person multidisciplinary session. The protocol feasibility has been evaluated on the following outcome: rejection rate (%), dropout rate (%), compliance and satisfaction's degree. RESULTS: Eighteen participants completed the whole protocol and 10% dropped-out. Seventy-two percent of participants obtained an excess weight loss ≥5%. All participants were satisfied of the telematics assessment. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 emergency has changed standard hospital procedures and this study could represent a landmark for an online pre-operative assessment method to adopt in case of new restrictions.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nutrition Assessment , Preoperative Care/methods , Psychological Tests , Social Media , Adult , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Male , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Patient Dropouts/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Weight Loss
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