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1.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 255, 2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196282

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is relatively little published on the effects of COVID-19 on respiratory physiology, particularly breathing patterns. We sought to determine if there were lasting detrimental effect following hospital discharge and if these related to the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: We reviewed lung function and breathing patterns in COVID-19 survivors > 3 months after discharge, comparing patients who had been admitted to the intensive therapy unit (ITU) (n = 47) to those who just received ward treatments (n = 45). Lung function included spirometry and gas transfer and breathing patterns were measured with structured light plethysmography. Continuous data were compared with an independent t-test or Mann Whitney-U test (depending on distribution) and nominal data were compared using a Fisher's exact test (for 2 categories in 2 groups) or a chi-squared test (for > 2 categories in 2 groups). A p-value of < 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. RESULTS: We found evidence of pulmonary restriction (reduced vital capacity and/or alveolar volume) in 65.4% of all patients. 36.1% of all patients has a reduced transfer factor (TLCO) but the majority of these (78.1%) had a preserved/increased transfer coefficient (KCO), suggesting an extrapulmonary cause. There were no major differences between ITU and ward lung function, although KCO alone was higher in the ITU patients (p = 0.03). This could be explained partly by obesity, respiratory muscle fatigue, localised microvascular changes, or haemosiderosis from lung damage. Abnormal breathing patterns were observed in 18.8% of subjects, although no consistent pattern of breathing pattern abnormalities was evident. CONCLUSIONS: An "extrapulmonary restrictive" like pattern appears to be a common phenomenon in previously admitted COVID-19 survivors. Whilst the cause of this is not clear, the effects seem to be similar on patients whether or not they received mechanical ventilation or had ward based respiratory support/supplemental oxygen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hospitalization/trends , Lung/physiology , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology , Spirometry/trends , Survivors , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/physiopathology , Lung Diseases/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/trends , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Respiratory Function Tests/trends , Spirometry/methods , Young Adult
3.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(12): e513-e516, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190914

ABSTRACT

Although post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 among adult survivors has gained significant attention, data in children hospitalized for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is limited. This study of commercially insured US children shows that those hospitalized with COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children have a substantial burden of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 sequelae and associated health care visits postdischarge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Adult , Humans , Aftercare , Follow-Up Studies , Patient Discharge , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Disease Progression , Delivery of Health Care
4.
Crit Care Med ; 50(12): 1799-1808, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190850

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze functional recovery groups of critically ill COVID-19 survivors during their hospital stay and to identify the associated factors. DESIGN: Prospective observational multicenter study. SETTING: Demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables were collected, and physical and functional status were evaluated. The Barthel index was evaluated at three time points: 15 days before hospitalization, at ICU discharge, and at hospital discharge from the ward. PATIENTS: Patients with functional independence before COVID-19 diagnosis were recruited from four hospitals and followed up until hospital discharge. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Three groups of functional recovery were described for 328 patients: functional independence ( n = 144; 44%), which included patients who preserved their functional status during hospitalization; recovered functionality ( n = 109; 33.2%), which included patients who showed dependence at ICU discharge but recovered their independence by hospital discharge; and functional dependency ( n = 75; 22.8%), which included patients who were dependent at ICU discharge and had not recovered their functional status at hospital discharge. The factors associated with becoming functionally dependent at ICU discharge were time to out-of-bed patient mobilization (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.11-1.29), age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04), hyperglycemia (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.56-4.07), and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (OR, 1.022; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04). Recovery to baseline independence during ward stays was associated with ICU length of stay (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99) and muscle strength (Medical Research Council test) at ICU discharge (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08-1.18). CONCLUSIONS: Age, hyperglycemia, and time for patient mobilization out of bed were independent factors associated with becoming physically dependent after their ICU stay. Recovery of physical function at hospital discharge was associated with muscle strength at ICU discharge and length of ICU stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperglycemia , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Patient Discharge , Intensive Care Units , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Length of Stay , Hospitals
5.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(6): 794-801, 2022 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144841

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The decision to discharge a patient from the hospital with confirmed or suspected coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is fraught with challenges. Patients who are discharged home must be both medically stable and able to safely isolate to prevent disease spread. Socioeconomically disadvantaged patient populations in particular may lack resources to safely quarantine and are at high risk for COVID-19 morbidity. METHODS: We developed a telehealth follow-up program for emergency department (ED) patients who received testing for COVID-19 from April 24-June 29, 2020 and were discharged home. Patients who were discharged with a pending COVID-19 test received follow-up calls on Days 1, 4, and 8. The objective of our program was to screen and provide referrals for health-related social needs (HRSN), conduct clinical screening for worsening symptoms, and deliver risk-reduction strategies for vulnerable individuals. We conducted retrospective chart reviews on all patients in this cohort to collect demographic information, testing results, and outcomes of clinical symptom and HRSN screening. Our primary outcome measurement was the need for clinical reassessment and referral for an unmet HRSN. RESULTS: From April 24-June 29, 2020, we made calls to 1,468 patients tested for COVID-19 and discharged home. On Day 4, we reached 67.0% of the 1,468 patients called. Of these, 15.9% were referred to a physician's assistant (PA) out of concern for clinical worsening and 12.4% were referred to an emergency department (ED) patient navigator for HRSNs. On Day 8, we reached 81.8% of the 122 patients called. Of these, 19.7% were referred to a PA for clinical reassessment and 14.0% were referred to an ED patient navigator for HRSNs. Our intervention reached 1,069 patients, of whom 12.6% required referral for HRSNs and 1.3% (n = 14) were referred to the ED or Respiratory Illness Clinic due to concern for worsening clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION: In this patient population, the demand for interventions to address social needs was as high as the need for clinical reassessment. Similar ED-based programs should be considered to help support patients' interdependent social and health needs beyond those related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Deterioration , Humans , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Health Inequities , COVID-19 Testing , Emergency Service, Hospital
6.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(20): e025915, 2022 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138319

ABSTRACT

Background Cardiac complications related to COVID-19 in children and adolescents include ventricular dysfunction, myocarditis, coronary artery aneurysm, and bradyarrhythmias, but tachyarrhythmias are less understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of children and adolescents experiencing tachyarrhythmias while hospitalized for acute severe COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Methods and Results This study involved a case series of 63 patients with tachyarrhythmias reported in a public health surveillance registry of patients aged <21 years hospitalized from March 15, 2020, to December 31, 2021, at 63 US hospitals. Patients with tachyarrhythmias were compared with patients with severe COVID-19-related complications without tachyarrhythmias. Tachyarrhythmias were reported in 22 of 1257 patients (1.8%) with acute COVID-19 and 41 of 2343 (1.7%) patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. They included supraventricular tachycardia in 28 (44%), accelerated junctional rhythm in 9 (14%), and ventricular tachycardia in 38 (60%); >1 type was reported in 12 (19%). Registry patients with versus without tachyarrhythmia were older (median age, 15.4 [range, 10.4-17.4] versus 10.0 [range, 5.4-14.8] years) and had higher illness severity on hospital admission. Intervention for treatment of tachyarrhythmia was required in 37 (59%) patients and included antiarrhythmic medication (n=31, 49%), electrical cardioversion (n=11, 17%), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n=8, 13%), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (n=9, 14%). Patients with tachyarrhythmias had longer hospital length of stay than those who did not, and 9 (14%) versus 77 (2%) died. Conclusions Tachyarrhythmias were a rare complication of acute severe COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents and were associated with worse clinical outcomes, highlighting the importance of close monitoring, aggressive treatment, and postdischarge care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tachycardia, Supraventricular , Child , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , Hospitalization , Tachycardia, Supraventricular/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy
7.
Pediatr Neonatol ; 63(6): 569-574, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to describe the cardiovascular injury and clinical features of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of children with MIS-C (from September 1, 2021 to February 28, 2022) in Children's Hospital 1, Ho Chi Minh City. Demographics, clinical history, significant underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, laboratory investigations, and medical management were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 76 patients were included (median age, 5.9 years old, 2 months-16 years). The male/female ratio was 1.6/1. Most patients (75/76) had no previous medical conditions. The mean time from acute severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection to symptom onset was 39 days. During an acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, these patients are either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. In addition to fever, gastrointestinal symptoms were also prominent, as observed in our study, with 75%, 73.7%, and 72.3% of patients presenting with abdominal pain, vomiting, and loose stools, respectively. The levels of inflammatory markers increased upon admission and returned to normal levels after treatment. Echocardiography revealed decreased myocardial contractility and coronary injury in 16 (21.1%) and 32 (42.1%) patients, respectively. Most cases (72/76) had no fever within 3 days of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and methylprednisolone treatment. No deaths occurred in this study. The mean duration of hospitalization was 7.2 days. CONCLUSION: Cardiovascular involvement was observed in approximately 53.9% of the patients. Anti-inflammatory treatment with IVIG and methylprednisolone had a favorable short-term outcome. However, long-term follow-up studies on post-discharge MIS-C cases are needed to make appropriate treatment recommendations in the acute phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Child , Humans , Female , Male , Child, Preschool , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Retrospective Studies , Vietnam/epidemiology , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , Fever , Methylprednisolone
9.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276608, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study is intended to assess the prevalence of depression and anxiety in individuals who had recovered from COVID-19 and been discharged from hospital (RD hereafter) in Wuhan, China, and to explore the factors associated with these mental disorders. METHODS: Participants of this study were the RD who were infected at the beginning of the outbreak from 13 communities in Jianghan District of Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China by convenience sampling in mid-2021. The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Short Version of COVID-19 Stigma Scale, the Peace of Mind Scale, the Resilience Style Questionnaire, and the Perceived Social Support Questionnaire were used to collect relevant information of the participants. Descriptive analyses, Pearson correlation analysis, and logistic regression analysis were used to describe and analyze the data and to examine the factors associated with the mental health status of this population. RESULTS: In total, we recruited 1601 participants from 3059 COVID-19 patients, and 1541 participants completed the questionnaire survey, with a response rate of 96.25%. Finally, 1297 participants met the inclusion and exclusion criteria in this study, of whom 28.8% and 37.9% reported mild to severe levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. Perceived better mental health status during hospitalization, higher frequency of alcohol use per week, peace of mind, higher education level, and resilience were negatively associated with anxiety, while stigma and history of psychological or emotional counseling before infection was positively associated with anxiety. More severe clinical classification of COVID-19 and stigma (AOR = 1.057, P<0.001) were both positively associated with depression, while perceived better mental health status during hospitalization (AOR = 0.564, P<0.001), higher frequency of alcohol use per week (AOR = 0.462, P = 0.004), peace of mind (AOR = 0.857, P<0.001), and social support (AOR = 0.972, P = 0.034) were negatively associated with depression. CONCLUSIONS: Tailored interventions on reducing stigma, enhancing mindfulness and social support should be taken into account to alleviate anxiety and depression among RD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Discharge , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires , China/epidemiology
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(11): e2241622, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117818

ABSTRACT

Importance: Minimal data are available regarding the postdischarge treatment of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). Objectives: To evaluate clinical characteristics associated with duration of postdischarge glucocorticoid use and assess postdischarge clinical course, laboratory test result trajectories, and adverse events in a multicenter cohort with MIS-C. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included patients with MIS-C hospitalized with severe illness and followed up for 3 months in an ambulatory setting. Patients younger than 21 years who were admitted between May 15, 2020, and May 31, 2021, at 13 US hospitals were included. Inclusion criteria were inpatient treatment comprising intravenous immunoglobulin, diagnosis of cardiovascular dysfunction (vasopressor requirement or left ventricular ejection fraction ≤55%), and availability of complete outpatient data for 3 months. Exposures: Glucocorticoid treatment. Main Outcomes and Measures: Main outcomes were patient characteristics associated with postdischarge glucocorticoid treatment, laboratory test result trajectories, and adverse events. Multivariable regression was used to evaluate factors associated with postdischarge weight gain (≥2 kg in 3 months) and hyperglycemia during illness. Results: Among 186 patients, the median age was 10.4 years (IQR, 6.7-14.2 years); most were male (107 [57.5%]), Black non-Hispanic (60 [32.3%]), and Hispanic or Latino (59 [31.7%]). Most children were critically ill (intensive care unit admission, 163 [87.6%]; vasopressor receipt, 134 [72.0%]) and received inpatient glucocorticoid treatment (178 [95.7%]). Most were discharged with continued glucocorticoid treatment (173 [93.0%]); median discharge dose was 42 mg/d (IQR, 30-60 mg/d) or 1.1 mg/kg/d (IQR, 0.7-1.7 mg/kg/d). Inpatient severity of illness was not associated with duration of postdischarge glucocorticoid treatment. Outpatient treatment duration varied (median, 23 days; IQR, 15-32 days). Time to normalization of C-reactive protein and ferritin levels was similar for glucocorticoid duration of less than 3 weeks vs 3 or more weeks. Readmission occurred in 7 patients (3.8%); none was for cardiovascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia developed in 14 patients (8.1%). Seventy-five patients (43%) gained 2 kg or more after discharge (median 4.1 kg; IQR, 3.0-6.0 kg). Inpatient high-dose intravenous and oral glucocorticoid therapy was associated with postdischarge weight gain (adjusted odds ratio, 6.91; 95% CI, 1.92-24.91). Conclusions and Relevance: In this multicenter cohort of patients with MIS-C and cardiovascular dysfunction, postdischarge glucocorticoid treatment was often prolonged, but clinical outcomes were similar in patients prescribed shorter courses. Outpatient weight gain was common. Readmission was infrequent, with none for cardiovascular dysfunction. These findings suggest that strategies are needed to optimize postdischarge glucocorticoid courses for patients with MIS-C.


Subject(s)
Hyperglycemia , Pneumonia, Viral , Child , Humans , Male , Female , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Stroke Volume , Aftercare , Ventricular Function, Left , Weight Gain
11.
Kardiologiia ; 62(10): 26-34, 2022 Oct 30.
Article in Russian, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117503

ABSTRACT

Aim      To evaluate the prevalence of residual symptoms in patients hospitalized for novel coronavirus infection at 8 months after discharge and the severity of such symptoms depending on demographic characteristics, concurrent diseases, and specific features of the acute period of COVID-19.Material and methods  This study included the patients who were managed for novel coronavirus infection in a COVID-19 hospital and provided their consent to participate in the study (98 patients). At 8 months after discharge from the hospital, a structured telephone interview was performed.Results Only 40 % of patients treated for COVID-19 did not have any complaints at 8 months after discharge from the hospital. The most frequent complaints in the long term were fatigue (30.5 %), weakness (28.4 %), shortness of breath (23.2 %), arthralgia (22.1 %), myalgia (17.9 %), and anosmia (15.8 %). The background of chronic diseases and obesity, percentage of lung damage according to CT data, and the requirement for oxygen support during the acute period in our sample were not related with the presence of symptoms in the long term. The presence and severity of symptoms during the long term were not determined by the clinical condition, volume of lung damage, or requirement for oxygen support but were related with the gender and severity of inflammation upon admission.Conclusion      Independent predictors for persistence of symptoms in the patient sample with severe novel coronavirus infection during the long term included chest and joint pain during the stay in the hospital, female gender, and increased levels of C-reactive protein upon admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Patient Discharge , Hospitalization , Oxygen
12.
Am J Manag Care ; 28(11): e399-e404, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116574

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of COVID-19 surges on hospital outcomes, particularly among non-COVID-19 patients. STUDY DESIGN: An interrupted time series design. METHODS: Using data from a large insurance claims clearinghouse, the study estimates the impact of the onset of the pandemic and the share of hospital COVID-19 patients on the likelihood of (1) in-hospital death, (2) in-hospital death or discharge to hospice, (3) discharge to other hospitals, (4) discharge to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and (5) discharge to home care. RESULTS: The odds of in-hospital death were about 1.7 times that before the onset of the pandemic among all patients and 1.2 times that among non-COVID-19 patients. Increased share of COVID-19 patients was associated with higher odds of in-hospital death among all patients and non-COVID-19 patients. The effects were more pronounced among patients 45 years and older and those with septicemia or pneumonia, and they were also stronger during the months in which COVID-19 cases surged. Although no sizable changes were found in the odds of discharge to other hospitals or SNFs, transfers to home care grew during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The negative impact of the pandemic on mortality among non-COVID-19 patients confirms existing concerns about patient care. No evidence suggests large-scale changes in practices regarding discharge/transfer to other facilities. The findings shed light on future efforts to monitor and improve inpatient care as the pandemic evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicare , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Patient Discharge , Hospitals , Patient Readmission
13.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275381, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: One of the stages of reproduction of SARS-CoV-2 is the S-protein glycosylation to facilitate penetration into target cells. It has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 is able to enter erythrocytes, interact with heme and porphyrin, which could influence HbA1c levels. Assessment of HbA1c levels in individuals with acute COVID-19 and after recovery may show clinical relevance of this hypothesis. AIM: To assess HbA1c levels in patients with COVID-19 in the acute phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter prospective study, which included patients hospitalized in Endocrinology Research Centre and the City Clinical Hospital № 52" diagnosed with COVID-19, virus identified/ not identified. Patients were divided into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level and the presence or absence of previous history of diabetes previous history of diabetes mellitus (DM): HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, HbA1c > 6.0% and patients with DM. Patients were examined during the acute COVID-19 phase and in early (6-8 weeks) and late (52±2 weeks) periods after recovery. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed in the group with initial HbA1c > 6.0% to clarify the diagnosis. RESULTS: We included 194 patients in the study. During the follow-up, 52 patients were examined in 6-8 week period: 7 with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 34 with HbA1c > 6.0%, 11-with previously diagnosed DM. Carbohydrate metabolism assessment in the later stages (52±2 weeks) after recovery was performed in 78 patients: 33 patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0%, 36 patients with HbA1c > 6.0% and 9 patients with previously established diabetes. HbA1c median in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% was 5.7% [5.3;5.8], with HbA1c>6.0% -6.4% [6.2; 6.6], with previously diagnosed DM-7.7% [7.2; 8.9]. Statistically significant decrease in HbA1c over time 6-8 weeks after extracts were obtained in both groups of individuals without a history of DM (Wilcoxon test, p<0.05). After 52±2 weeks we observed HbA1c decrease in all three groups (Fridman test, p<0.05): in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.0% median HbA1c was 5.5[5.3;5.7], with HbA1c>6.0% - 6.1[6.15;6.54], with previously diagnosed DM-7.8 [5.83; 8.08]. Development of DM after 52±2 weeks was recorded in 7.24% of all examined patients without a history of DM, which is 16.6% of the total number of patients examined in dynamics with HbA1c > 6.0%. CONCLUSION: HbA1c elevation during the acute phase of COVID-19 may be false due to the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on hemoglobin kinetics and/or detection on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virion highly glycosylated S-proteins by high performance liquid chromatography determinations. Upon detection HbA1c > 6.0% in patients with COVID-19 in the active phase of the disease without concomitant hyperglycemia re-determine the level of HbA1c after recovery is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Prospective Studies , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals , Survivors
15.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30093, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090689

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: Patients surviving COVID-19 have been described as being at risk of developing sequelae. We aimed to investigate and elicit persistent symptoms, emotional status and quality-of-life in patients discharged after an acute COVID-19 episode. METHODS: Patient-reported outcome measures were collected during a telephone interview 30 days and 1 year after discharge. Patients' general health status was evaluated using questions based on their symptoms, emotional status was assessed using the items 9 to 12 of the HeartQoL questionnaire and quality of life was assessed at 1 year through the EQ-5D-5L. In patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, all 14 items of the HeartQoL questionnaire were completed to derive the HeartQoL global score. RESULTS: Among 687 patients who survived after being hospitalised for COVID-19 at the University Hospitals of Geneva between 26 February and 26 April 2020, 184 (27%) and 165 (24%), respectively, participated in the follow-up at 30 days and 1 year. Of these 184 participants, 62% were male, median age was 58 years and 21% had a past medical history of cardiovascular disease. At one month after discharge, 61% (113/184) of patients presented fatigue and 28% (52/184) dyspnoea. One year after discharge, the main complaints were persistent fatigue in 27% (45/165) of patients, neurological problems in 17% (28/165) and dyspnoea in 14% (23/165). Eight percent (14/184) of patients declared being significantly worried 1 month after discharge and 5% (9/184) feeling depressed. The number of patients reporting being significantly worried or depressed at 1 year was lower. Regarding the quality of life at 1 year, the median EQ-5D-5L visual analogue scale score was 80 (interquartile range 70-90). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately half of patients reported some symptoms 1 year after discharge following an acute episode of COVID-19. The predominant symptom was persistent fatigue both at 1-month and at 1-year follow-up. Emotional status and quality of life appeared satisfactory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17972, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087307

ABSTRACT

This study investigated whether acute liver injury (ALI) persisted and identified predictors of ALI recovery [as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level] at hospital discharge and 2 months post-discharge for 7595 hospitalized COVID-19 patients from the Montefiore Health System (03/11/2020-06/03/2021). Mild liver injury (mLI) was defined as ALT = 1.5-5 ULN, and severe livery injury (sLI) was ALT ≥ 5 ULN. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of ALI onset and recovery. There were 4571 (60.2%), 2306 (30.4%), 718 (9.5%) patients with no liver injury (nLI), mLI and sLI, respectively. Males showed higher incidence of sLI and mLI (p < 0.05). Mortality odds ratio was 4.15 [95% CI 3.41, 5.05, p < 0.001] for sLI and 1.69 [95% CI 1.47, 1.96, p < 0.001] for mLI compared to nLI. The top predictors (ALT, lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin, lymphocytes) accurately predicted sLI onset up to three days prior. Only 33.5% of mLI and 17.1% of sLI patients (survivors) recovered completely at hospital discharge. Most ALI patients (76.7-82.4%) recovered completely ~ 2 months post-discharge. The top predictors accurately predicted recovery post discharge with 83.2 ± 2.2% accuracy. In conclusion, most COVID-19 patients with ALI recovered completely ~ 2 months post discharge. Early identification of patients at-risk of persistent ALI could help to prevent long-term liver complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Liver Diseases , Male , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Alanine Transaminase , Aftercare , Liver Function Tests , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Liver Diseases/etiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Hospitals , Ferritins , Lactate Dehydrogenases
17.
Surg Endosc ; 36(11): 7898-7914, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085378

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As enhanced recovery programs (ERPs) have continued to evolve, the length of hospitalization (LOS) following elective minimally invasive colorectal surgery has continued to decline. Further refinements in multimodal perioperative pain management strategies have resulted in reduced opioid consumption. The interest in ambulatory colectomy has dramatically accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Severe restrictions in hospital capacity and fear of COVID transmission forced surgical teams to rethink strategies to further reduce length of inpatient stay. METHODS: Members of the SAGES Colorectal Surgery Committee began reviewing the emergence of SDD protocols and early publications for SDD in 2019. The authors met at regular intervals during 2020-2022 period reviewing SDD protocols, safe patient selection criteria, surrogates for postoperative monitoring, and early outcomes. RESULTS: Early experience with SDD protocols for elective, minimally invasive colorectal surgery suggests that SDD is feasible and safe in well-selected patients and procedures. SDD protocols are associated with reduced opioid use and prescribing. Patient perception and experience with SDD is favourable. For early adopters, SDD has been the natural evolution of well-developed ERPs. Like all ERPs, SDD begins in the office setting, identifying the correct patient and procedure, aligning goals and objectives, and the perioperative education of the patient and their supporting significant others. A thorough discussion with the patient regarding expected activity levels, oral intake, and pain control post operatively lays the foundation for a successful application of SDD programs. These observations may not apply to all patient populations, institutions, practice types, or within the scope of an existing ERP. However, if the underlying principles of SDD can be incorporated into an existing institutional ERP, it may further reduce the incidence of post operative ileus, prolonged LOS, and improve the effectiveness of oral analgesia for postoperative pain management and reduced opioid use and prescribing. CONCLUSIONS: The SAGES Colorectal Surgery Committee has performed a comprehensive review of the early experience with SDD. This manuscript summarizes SDD early results and considerations for safe and stepwise implementation of SDD with a specific focus on ERP evolution, patient selection, remote monitoring, and other relevant considerations based on hospital settings and surgical practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Surgery , Humans , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Colectomy/methods , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Surgery/methods , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Patient Selection , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
19.
Tomography ; 8(5): 2588-2603, 2022 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071784

ABSTRACT

Long-term pulmonary sequelae in COVID-19 patients are currently under investigation worldwide. Potential relationships between blood sampling and functional and radiological findings are crucial to guide the follow-up. In this study, we collected and evaluated clinical status, namely symptoms and patients' reported outcome, pulmonary function tests (PFT), laboratory tests, and radiological findings at 3- and 12-months post-discharge in patients admitted between 25 February and 2 May 2020, and who survived severe COVID-19 pneumonia. A history of chronic pulmonary disease or COVID-19-unrelated complications were used as exclusion criteria. Unenhanced CTs were analyzed quantitatively (compromising lung volume %) and qualitatively, with main patterns of: ground-glass opacity (GGO), consolidation, and reticular configuration. Patients were subsequently divided into groups based on their radiological trends and according to the evolution in the percentage of compromised lung volume. At 12 months post-discharge, seventy-one patients showed significantly improved laboratory tests and PFT. Among them, 63 patients also underwent CT examination: all patients with negative CT findings at three months (n = 14) had negative CT also at 12 months; among the 49/63 patients presenting CT alterations at three months, 1/49 (2%) normalized, 40/49 (82%) improved, 7/49 (14%) remained stably abnormal, and 1/49 (2%) worsened. D-dimer values were low in patients with normal CT and higher in cases with improved or stably abnormal CT (median values 213 vs. 329 vs. 1000 ng/mL, respectively). The overall compromised lung volume was reduced compared with three months post-discharge (12.3 vs. 14.4%, p &lt; 0.001). In stably abnormal CT, the main pulmonary pattern changed, showing a reduction in GGO and an increase in reticular configuration. To summarize, PFT are normal in most COVID-19 survivors 12 months post-discharge, but CT structural abnormalities persist (although sensibly improved over time) and are associated with higher D-dimer values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Discharge , Aftercare , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Survivors
20.
Int J Med Inform ; 168: 104885, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Leading influencing factors for telemedicine implementation remain unclear, affecting the focus of intervention strategies. Despite recent effectiveness evidence of video telemedicine visits, limited evidence exists regarding patients' willingness to use video follow-up. Moreover, patients' acceptance is crucial for implementing such services. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a large-sample survey to analyze patient willingness and perceptions of post-discharge video follow-up and assessed the factors influencing their willingness during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHOD: In February and March 2022, we conducted a face-to-face questionnaire survey involving inpatients in a tertiary care hospital in Longhua District, Shenzhen, China. We assessed demographics, health-related determinants, access to technology and literacy, preferences, willingness, and opinions toward video telemedicine follow-up. We implemented random forest and logistic regression analyses to obtain reliable results. RESULTS: In total, 1,017 inpatients completed the survey. Overall, as an initial choice, 44.9 % preferred telephone consultation for post-discharge follow-up, which was followed by video telemedicine (17.1 %), WeChat voice calls (11.6 %), SMS text messages (10.7 %), WeChat graphic messages (10.5 %), and in-person visits (4.5 %). Moreover, 54.9 % were willing to experience video visits. The results highlight the perceived benefits outweighing the risks (OR 2.64, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), patients' trust in the physician (OR 2.41, 95 % CI 1.45, 3.99), access to a private space (OR 2.18, 95 % CI 1.01, 2.96), medium geographical distance (compared to long distance, OR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.54, 0.98), moderate disease (compared to mild disease, OR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57, 0.99), followed by the comfort with video technology (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.76, 3.95), broadband internet accessibility (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.07, 2.27), privacy concerns (OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.43, 0.89), and prior telemedicine video experience (OR 1.77, 95 % CI 1.15, 2.72), as factors influencing the willingness to use video follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A low percentage of patients chose video visits as their initial decisions; nevertheless, most had a positive attitude toward video follow-up visits. The willingness to choose video telemedicine post-discharge follow-up was influenced by geographical distance, disease severity, basic telemedicine requirements, physician-patient relationship, and perceptions of video communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Referral and Consultation , Patient Discharge , Aftercare , Follow-Up Studies , Telephone , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods
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