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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 725840, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775845

ABSTRACT

Background: Health literacy, a recently determined construct plays an important role in how individuals are able to manage their health. A useful approach for the assessment of health literacy is to measure the comprehension of available patient education materials (PEMs). Objective: We aimed at assessing the usefulness of PEMS available in Hungarian by testing comprehension of selected PEMs in different groups of users. Methods: Comprehension of patient education materials in the domain of healthcare was tested by selecting PEMs and creating questions based on their text in 3 dimensions of health literacy: understand, process/appraise, apply/use. Twenty questions were created that could be answered without pre-existing knowledge by reading the appropriate text taken from PEMs. Comprehension was examined in four groups: laypersons, non-professional healthcare workers, 1st year healthcare students, and 5th year medical students. Readability indices were calculated for the same texts to which questions were created. Results: Laypersons answered <50% of the PEMs-based questions correctly. Non-professional healthcare workers performed better with 57% of right answers but significantly worse than healthcare students or medical students. Those with at least high school qualification (maturity exam) showed significantly higher comprehension compared to those with lower educational attainment. Persons in good or very good health also had significantly better comprehension than those in less favorable health. All readability indices showed that comprehension of the tested PEMs required at least 10 years of schooling or more. Therefore, these PEMS are difficult to understand for persons with less than high school level of education. Conclusion: Rephrasing of the investigated patient educational materials would be recommended so that they better fit the educational attainment of the Hungarian population. Evaluation of the readability and comprehensibility of other PEMs also seems warranted.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Comprehension , Educational Status , Humans , Patient Education as Topic
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e31449, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760105

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of mobile health technologies has been necessary to deliver patient education to patients with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This open-label randomized controlled trial evaluated the effects of a diabetes educational platform-Taipei Medical University-LINE Oriented Video Education-delivered through a social media app. METHODS: Patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a clinic through physician referral. The social media-based program included 51 videos: 10 about understanding diabetes, 10 about daily care, 6 about nutrition care, 21 about diabetes drugs, and 4 containing quizzes. The intervention group received two or three videos every week and care messages every 2 weeks through the social media platform for 3 months, in addition to usual care. The control group only received usual care. Outcomes were measured at clinical visits through self-reported face-to-face questionnaires at baseline and at 3 months after the intervention, including the Simplified Diabetes Knowledge Scale (true/false version), the Diabetes Care Profile-Attitudes Toward Diabetes Scales, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Health literacy was measured at baseline using the Newest Vital Sign tool. Differences in HbA1c levels and questionnaire scores before and after the intervention were compared between groups. The associations of knowledge, attitudes, and self-care activities with health literacy were assessed. RESULTS: Patients with type 2 diabetes completed the 3-month study, with 91 out of 181 (50.3%) patients in the intervention group and 90 (49.7%) in the control group. The change in HbA1c did not significantly differ between groups (intervention group: mean 6.9%, SD 0.8% to mean 7.0%, SD 0.9%, P=.34; control group: mean 6.7%, SD 0.6% to mean 6.7%, SD 0.7%, P=.91). Both groups showed increased mean knowledge scores at 12 weeks, increasing from 68.3% (SD 16.4%) to 76.7% (SD 11.7%; P<.001) in the intervention group and from 64.8% (SD 18.2%) to 73.2% (SD 12.6%; P<.001) in the control group. Positive improvements in attitudes and self-care activities were only observed in the intervention group (attitudes: mean difference 0.2, SD 0.5, P=.001; self-care activities: mean difference 0.3, SD 1.2, P=.03). A 100% utility rate was achieved for 8 out of 21 (38%) medication-related videos. Low health literacy was a significant risk factor for baseline knowledge scores in the intervention group, with an odds ratio of 2.80 (95% CI 1.28-6.12; P=.01); this became insignificant after 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: The social media-based program was effective at enhancing the knowledge, attitudes, and self-care activities of patients with diabetes. This intervention was also helpful for patients with low health literacy in diabetes knowledge. The program represents a potentially useful tool for delivering diabetes education to patients through social media, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04876274; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT04876274.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , Social Media , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic
4.
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(2): e220354, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699967

ABSTRACT

Importance: COVID-19 has disproportionately killed older adults and racial and ethnic minority individuals, raising questions about the relevance of advance care planning (ACP) in this population. Video decision aids and communication skills training offer scalable delivery models. Objective: To assess whether ACP video decision aids and a clinician communication intervention improved the rate of ACP documentation during an evolving pandemic, with a focus on African American and Hispanic patients. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Advance Care Planning: Communicating With Outpatients for Vital Informed Decisions trial was a pre-post, open-cohort nonrandomized controlled trial that compared ACP documentation across the baseline pre-COVID-19 period (September 15, 2019, to March 14, 2020), the COVID-19 wave 1 period (March 15, 2020, to September 14, 2020), and an intervention period (December 15, 2020, to June 14, 2021) at a New York metropolitan area ambulatory network of 22 clinics. All patients 65 years or older who had at least 1 clinic or telehealth visit during any of the 3 study periods were included. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was ACP documentation. Results: A total of 14 107 patients (mean [SD] age, 81.0 [8.4] years; 8856 [62.8%] female; and 2248 [15.9%] African American or Hispanic) interacted with clinicians during the pre-COVID-19 period; 12 806 (mean [SD] age, 81.2 [8.5] years; 8047 [62.8%] female; and 1992 [15.6%] African American or Hispanic), during wave 1; and 15 106 (mean [SD] 80.9 [8.3] years; 9543 [63.2%] female; and 2535 [16.8%] African American or Hispanic), during the intervention period. Clinicians documented ACP in 3587 patients (23.8%) during the intervention period compared with 2525 (17.9%) during the pre-COVID-19 period (rate difference [RD], 5.8%; 95% CI, 0.9%-7.9%; P = .01) and 1598 (12.5%) during wave 1 (RD, 11.3%; 95% CI, 6.3%-12.1%; P < .001). Advance care planning was documented in 447 African American patients (30.0%) during the intervention period compared with 233 (18.1%) during the pre-COVID-19 period (RD, 11.9%; 95% CI, 4.1%-15.9%; P < .001) and 130 (11.0%) during wave 1 (RD, 19.1%; 95% CI, 11.7%-21.2%; P < .001). Advance care planning was documented for 222 Hispanic patients (21.2%) during the intervention period compared with 127 (13.2%) during the pre-COVID-19 period (RD, 8.0%; 95% CI, 2.1%-10.9%; P = .004) and 82 (10.2%) during wave 1 (RD, 11.1%; 95% CI, 5.5%-14.5%; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This intervention, implemented during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic, was associated with higher rates of ACP documentation, especially for African American and Hispanic patients. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04660422.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Clinical Decision-Making , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , New York/epidemiology , Patient Education as Topic , Videotape Recording
7.
Dermatol Surg ; 48(2): 187-190, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 Pandemic prompted the widespread implementation of telemedicine across healthcare. OBJECTIVE: To analyze telemedicine adoption by Mohs Micrographic surgeons (MMS) during the COVID-19 pandemic; to analyze the attitudes and perceived barriers to its long-term continuation by MMS practices. METHODS AND MATERIALS: An online multiple-choice survey was distributed to members of the American College of Mohs Surgeons. RESULTS: 86.1% of surveyed Mohs surgeons initiated telemedicine during the pandemic surge. The most common uses for telemedicine amongst respondents were post-surgery management (77.4%), "spot checks" (60.9%), and surgical consultations (59.1%). 73.1% report patients were receptive to telemedicine. 68.6% believe that telemedicine has a place in dermatologic surgery; 49.5% plan to incorporate telemedicine into their surgical practices long-term. Physical exam limitations, fitting telemedicine into practice workflow, and patient reception/patient training were viewed as the most significant barriers to long-term implementation. CONCLUSIONS: While valuable use cases for telemedicine were identified with most Mohs surgeon respondents feeling that telemedicine has a place in their practices, there is uncertainty in how to implement telemedicine into the dermatologic surgery practice workflow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Mohs Surgery , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/organization & administration , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Examination , Pilot Projects , Postoperative Care , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workflow
8.
Nutrients ; 13(2)2021 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575167

ABSTRACT

Childhood obesity is a worldwide health emergency. In many cases, it is directly linked to inappropriate eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. During lockdown aimed at containing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread, children have been forced to stay at home. The present study aimed at investigating the lifestyles of outpatients (aged 5-17 years) with complicated obesity enrolled in the day-hospital food education program at the Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù in Rome. A survey was performed based on a structured questionnaire, investigating dietary habits and lifestyles. The questionnaire answers were rated as "yes/no/sometimes" or "often/never/sometimes". Eighty-eight families correctly completed the questionnaire between March and May 2020. The results highlighted that 85.2% (N = 75) of the patients ate breakfast regularly, and 64.3% (N = 72) consumed fruit as an afternoon snack. However, 21.6% (N = 19) did just "often" home workouts, and 50.0% (N = 44) reported an increase of feeling hungry with "sometimes" frequency. There is a significant relationship of feeling hungry with gender (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.048) and, also, between gender with having breakfast (p = 0.020) and cooking (p = 0.006). Living a healthy lifestyle during lockdown was difficult for the outpatients, mainly due to the increase in a sedentary lifestyle and the increase in feeling hungry, but some healthy eating habits were maintained, as advised during the food education program provided before lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Patient Education as Topic , Pediatric Obesity/prevention & control , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology
9.
Diabet Med ; 39(4): e14755, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid implementation of remote care delivery in type 1 diabetes. We studied current modes of care delivery, healthcare professional experiences and impact on insulin pump training in type 1 diabetes care in the United Kingdom (UK). METHODS: The UK Diabetes Technology Network designed a 48-question survey aimed at healthcare professionals providing care in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-three healthcare professionals (48% diabetes physicians, 52% diabetes educators and 88% working in adult services) from approximately 75 UK centres (52% university hospitals, 46% general and community hospitals), responded to the survey. Telephone consultations were the main modality of care delivery. There was a higher reported time taken for video consultations versus telephone (p < 0.001). Common barriers to remote consultations were patient familiarity with technology (72%) and access to patient device data (67%). We assessed the impact on insulin pump training. A reduction in total new pump starts (73%) and renewals (61%) was highlighted. Common barriers included patient digital literacy (61%), limited healthcare professional experience (46%) and time required per patient (44%). When grouped according to size of insulin pump service, pump starts and renewals in larger services were less impacted by the pandemic compared to smaller services. CONCLUSION: This survey highlights UK healthcare professional experiences of remote care delivery. While supportive of virtual care models, a number of factors highlighted, especially patient digital literacy, need to be addressed to improve virtual care delivery and device training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Health Personnel , Self-Management/education , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Biomedical Technology/education , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/instrumentation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Glycemic Control/instrumentation , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Insulin Infusion Systems , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Self-Management/methods , Self-Management/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
10.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 27(12): 719-725, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Preoperative counseling can affect postoperative outcomes and satisfaction. We hypothesized that patient preparedness would be equivalent after preoperative counseling phone calls versus preoperative counseling office visits before prolapse surgery. METHODS: This was an equivalence randomized controlled trial of women undergoing pelvic organ prolapse surgery. Participants were randomized to receive standardized counseling via a preoperative phone call or office visit. The primary outcome was patient preparedness measured on a 5-point Likert scale by the Patient Preparedness Questionnaire at the postoperative visit. A predetermined equivalence margin of 20% was used. Two 1-sided tests for equivalence were used for the primary outcome. RESULTS: We randomized 120 women. The study was concluded early because of COVID-19 and subsequent surgery cancellations. There were 85 participants with primary outcome data (43 offices, 42 phones). Mean age was 62.0 years (±1.0) and 64 (75.3%) had stage III or stage IV prolapse. The primary outcome, patient preparedness measured at the postoperative visit, was equivalent between groups (office, n = 43 [97.7%]; phone, n = 42 [97.6%], P < 0.001). Most women reported they would have preferred a phone call (n = 66, 65.5%) with more women in the phone group expressing this preference than the office group (office 40.5% vs phone 90.5%, P < 0.001). Ultimately, nearly all women (96.5%) were satisfied with their method of counseling. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative counseling phone calls were equivalent to office visits for patient preparedness for pelvic organ prolapse surgery. This study demonstrates patient acceptance of phone calls for preoperative counseling. Telehealth modalities should be considered as an option for preoperative patient counseling.


Subject(s)
Counseling/methods , Office Visits , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Pelvic Organ Prolapse/surgery , Telephone , Early Termination of Clinical Trials , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Patient Preference , Patient Satisfaction , Preoperative Care
11.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 158, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506686

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading chronic rheumatic disease in childhood. To achieve adherence to therapy, in-depth understanding of disease and treatment options are important. OBJECTIVE: Development of specifically designed illustrations and standardised, easy-to-read texts for children and adolescents with JIA. Education materials were tested for comprehensibility and content validity. We hypothesised that children would be able to increase their knowledge about JIA after presentation of materials. METHODS: The illustrations were designed by a graphic artist and the informative texts consecutively transformed to easy-to-read language. The materials appear as a modular system to allow individualized information for each patient. The illustrations and texts were tested for knowledge gain and improvement of self-efficacy in children affected by JIA/ rheumatic diseases and controls. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was tested as an overall assessment of patients' well-being. RESULTS: 46 controls (71% female) and 38 patients (48% female) with a median age of 11 years were tested in a standardised setting. In both groups knowledge gain was significant (controls: t (44) = 11.08, p < 0.001, d = 1.65; patients: t (37) = 7.48, p < 0.001, d = 1.21). The control group had a significantly higher enhancement of disease knowledge compared to patients' group (p = .046) The follow-up testing was only performed in one school class (20 controls) due to Covid-19 pandemic with significant improvement compared to the pre-test results (p = .002). The enhancement of self-efficacy through the teaching session was significantly higher in the patients' group. No impairment of HRQoL was seen. CONCLUSION: Explaining juvenile rheumatic diseases and therapeutic strategies is an important task in paediatric rheumatology. To avoid incomprehensible explanations in medical jargon, illustrations and easy-to-read texts were developed. Standardised presentation of the newly created materials resulted in a significant improvement of disease knowledge in patients and controls in addition to an enhancement of self-efficacy in patients.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Compliance , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Adolescent , Art , Child , Comprehension , Female , Humans , Male
12.
Curr Oncol ; 28(5): 3420-3429, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504966

ABSTRACT

As multiple different treatment options are available for prostate cancer (PCa) and YouTube is commonly used as a source for medical information, we performed a systematic and comparative assessment of available videos guiding patients on their choice for the optimal treatment. An independent search for surgical therapy or radiotherapy of PCa on YouTube was performed and the 40 most viewed videos of both groups were analyzed. The validated DISCERN questionnaire and PEMAT were utilized to evaluate their quality and misinformation. The median overall quality of the videos was found to be low for surgery videos, while radiotherapy videos results reached a moderate quality. The median PEMAT understandability score was 60% (range 0-100%) for radiotherapy and 75% (range 40-100) for surgery videos. The radiotherapy videos contained less misinformation and were judged to be of higher quality. Summarized, the majority of the provided videos offer insufficient quality of content and are potentially subject to commercial bias without reports on possible conflict of interest. Thus, most of available videos on YouTube informing PCa patients about possible treatment methods are not suited for a balanced patient education or as a basis for the patient's decision.


Subject(s)
Prostatic Neoplasms , Social Media , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Patient Education as Topic , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Video Recording
13.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480894

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the implementation of policies that mandate various restrictions on daily life, including social distancing, the closure of public services and schools, and movement limitations. Even though these restrictive measures decreased the COVID-19 spread, they may have detrimental effects on various lifestyle components such as physical inactivity, sedentary behavior, and dietary habits, influencing the maintenance of weight and contributing to obesity among children and adolescents. The coexistence of childhood obesity and COVID-19 and changes in the bioecological environment have put children and adolescents at increased risk for developing obesity and exacerbating the severity of this disorder. The use of telehealth technology is a modern approach useful for the delivery of health care services by health care professionals, where distance is a critical factor. Telehealth is effective in promoting increased self-monitoring and behavioral change, and provides the opportunity to perform online nutritional support and exercise training programs to promote a healthy lifestyle and reduce sedentary behaviors in children and adolescents. Telehealth, including tele-exercise and tele-nutrition, has the potential to address many of the key challenges in providing health services, including in patients with obesity during the COVID-19 outbreak. This narrative review aims to describe the role of telehealth as an opportunity in the management of pediatric obesity in the COVID-19 era, and to deliver nutrition and exercise programs for the maintenance of health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Healthy , Exercise Therapy , Nutritive Value , Pediatric Obesity/therapy , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adolescent Behavior , Age Factors , Child , Child Behavior , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Patient Education as Topic , Pediatric Obesity/diagnosis , Pediatric Obesity/physiopathology , Pediatric Obesity/psychology , Treatment Outcome
14.
J Pediatr ; 241: 203-211.e1, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473386

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine if training residents in a structured communication method elicits specific behaviors in a laboratory model of interaction with vaccine-hesitant parents. STUDY DESIGN: Standardized patients portraying vaccine-hesitant parents were used to assess the effectiveness of training in the Announce, Inquire, Mirror, Secure (AIMS) Method for Healthy Conversations. Blinded pediatric residents were pseudorandomized to receive AIMS or control training and underwent pre- and post-training encounters with blinded standardized patients. Encounters were assessed by blinded raters using a novel tool. Participant confidence and standardized patient evaluations of the participants' general communication skills were assessed. RESULTS: Ratings were available for 27 AIMS and 26 control participants. Statistically significant increases in post-training scores (maximum = 30) were detected in AIMS, but not in control, participants (median, 21.3 [IQR, 19.8-24.8] vs 18.8 [IQR, 16.9-20.9]; P < .001). Elements (maximum score = 6) with significant increases were Inquire (0.67 [IQR, 0-1.76] vs -0.33 [IQR, -0.67 to 0.33]; P < .001); Mirror (1.33 [IQR, 0 to 2] vs -0.33 [IQR, -0.92 to 0]; P < .001) and Secure (0.33 [IQR, 0 to 1.67] vs -0.17 [IQR, -0.67 to 0.33]; P = .017). Self-confidence increased equally in both groups. Standardized patients did not detect a difference in communication skills after training and between groups. Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool were modest. CONCLUSIONS: Standardized patients proved useful in studying the effectiveness of structured communication training, but may have been limited in their ability to perceive a difference between groups owing to the predetermined encounter outcome of vaccine refusal. AIMS training should be studied in real-world scenarios to determine if it impacts vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Communication , Internship and Residency/methods , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations , Adult , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Infant , Kentucky , Male , Parents , Patient Simulation
15.
Nurs Outlook ; 70(1): 137-144, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has required nursing innovations to meet patient care needs not previously encountered. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe nursing innovations conceived, implemented, and desired during the first COVID-19 surge. METHODS: The investigators invited registered nurses employed across 16 Midwest hospitals (6,207) to complete the survey. Respondents provided demographics and written descriptions of innovations they conceived, witnessed, and desired. Investigators analyzed text responses using standard content analytic procedures and summarized quantitative demographics using percentages. FINDINGS: Nurses reported seven types of innovations that would (a) improve personal protective equipment (PPE), (b) limit the need to repeatedly don and doff PPE, (c) ensure safer practice, (d) conserve and access supplies, (e) provide patient and family education and support, (f) make team member communication more efficient, and (g) improve peer support. DISCUSSION: Nurses are in a unique position to generate innovative solutions to meet patient care needs under adverse and rapidly changing situations.


Subject(s)
Communication , Diffusion of Innovation , Occupational Health , Patient Care/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Universities , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Indiana , Male , Patient Education as Topic , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211044344, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440890

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many aspects of everyday life. Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) are in a particularly difficult situation. The purpose of the present study was to contribute to the very limited research on the everyday aspects of functioning in PID patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The survey included 85 adult PID patients treated with immunoglobulin replacement therapy in four reference centers for immunology. Everyday functioning of the patients as well as their opinion concerning new solutions in medical care were analyzed. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the percentage of patients experiencing fear/anxiety has increased from 47% to 70%. The wide dissemination of information about the SARS-CoV-2 in the media has increased anxiety in 40% of the patients. Patients diagnosed with PID were most afraid of the exposure to contact with strangers, especially in public places. As many as 67 respondents (79%) considered the introduction of restrictions concerning social functioning as good. Only every fifth person learned about the pandemic from reliable sources. Eighty three percent of the patients receiving immunoglobulin substitution experienced less fear of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The patients positively evaluated the solutions related to the direct delivery of drugs to the place of residence in order to continue home IgRT therapy. Fifty three respondents (62.5%) believed that the possibility of a remote consultation was a very good solution. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to increase educational activities concerning the pandemic provided by health care professionals, as patients obtain information mainly from the media and the Internet, which adversely affects the feeling of anxiety. The pandemic, in addition to the very negative impact on patients and the deterioration of their daily functioning, has made patients appreciate their life more, devote more time to family and friends, and do things they like.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/drug therapy , Access to Information , Adult , Affect , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cost of Illness , Drug Substitution , Fear , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Education as Topic , Poland , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/diagnosis , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/psychology , Social Behavior , Telemedicine , Treatment Outcome
17.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(12): 2109-2115, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437257

ABSTRACT

As the most well-known and popular video-sharing platform around the world, YouTube is an influential tool for the dissemination of health-related information. In addition, considering the increase in obtaining information from internet-based sources in pandemic conditions, YouTube has become more important in the presentation of information related to COVID-19. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate videos related to COVID-19 vaccination in rheumatic diseases (RD) on YouTube. In this descriptive study, 334 video URLs listed with six search terms were recorded (26 July 2021). Three quality groups (high, intermediate, and low) were created based on the Global Quality Scores (GQS). Video sources were identified and various video parameters were compared between the quality groups. Following the implementation of the exclusion criteria, 56 videos remained for further analysis; of which 37 (66.07%) were evaluated as high quality, 12 (21.42%) as intermediate quality, and 7 (12.51%) as low quality. No significant difference was determined between the quality groups in per day values of views, likes, dislikes, and comments. The sources of high-quality videos were pharmaceutical company (n = 1; 100%), pharmacist (n = 1; 100%), society-organization (n = 17; 85%), and academic (n = 3; 75%). Although two-thirds of the videos were high quality, it should be kept in mind that intermediate and low-quality videos are also available. Users should not assume the quality of the videos based on the number of views, likes, dislikes, and comments, but should focus more on video sources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Rheumatic Diseases , Social Media , Video Recording , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Information Dissemination , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
19.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1119-1131, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428326

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused severe economic and health impacts in the United States, and the impact is disproportionately more in socially disadvantages areas. The available data, albeit limited in children, suggest that the initial concerns of the potential of serious impact of COVID-19 illness in children with asthma are unproven so far. The reduction in asthma morbidities is due to improved adherence, COVID-19 control measures, school closures, and decreased exposure to allergens and viral infections in children. During the pandemic, asthma guidelines were updated to guide physicians in asthma care. In the face of unprecedented time, it is important to be vigilant, adhere to treatment guidelines, and implement preventive measures to eradicate the virus and improve outcomes in children with asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma/enzymology , Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Education as Topic/methods , School Health Services/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Humans , Medication Adherence , Schools/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States
20.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(17): 5542-5546, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417451

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The role of nurses has great educational-scientific potential in COVID-19 vaccination. The aim of this work is to clarify whether the educational role of IBD nurses in vaccination is perceived by IBD patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out, through a questionnaire, to evaluate how many IBD patients received health education about vaccinations from the dedicated nurses (IBD nurses). RESULTS: There were four hundred questionnaires, 310 patients (77.5%) answered all questions. The nurse does not appear to help educate patients on influenza vaccination (66.1%) or pneumococcal vaccination (81.6%). Disclosed patients have many doubts about the new COVID-19 vaccination (74.4%) and many seek information (74.8%) and think that the nurse can provide the necessary information (70%). CONCLUSIONS: IBD nurses do not seem very active in the vaccination education role, and they do not meet patients' expectations, which are conversely very high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nurse's Role , Patient Education as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Fear , Female , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/psychology , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses , Trust , Young Adult
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