Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(12): 2109-2115, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437257

ABSTRACT

As the most well-known and popular video-sharing platform around the world, YouTube is an influential tool for the dissemination of health-related information. In addition, considering the increase in obtaining information from internet-based sources in pandemic conditions, YouTube has become more important in the presentation of information related to COVID-19. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate videos related to COVID-19 vaccination in rheumatic diseases (RD) on YouTube. In this descriptive study, 334 video URLs listed with six search terms were recorded (26 July 2021). Three quality groups (high, intermediate, and low) were created based on the Global Quality Scores (GQS). Video sources were identified and various video parameters were compared between the quality groups. Following the implementation of the exclusion criteria, 56 videos remained for further analysis; of which 37 (66.07%) were evaluated as high quality, 12 (21.42%) as intermediate quality, and 7 (12.51%) as low quality. No significant difference was determined between the quality groups in per day values of views, likes, dislikes, and comments. The sources of high-quality videos were pharmaceutical company (n = 1; 100%), pharmacist (n = 1; 100%), society-organization (n = 17; 85%), and academic (n = 3; 75%). Although two-thirds of the videos were high quality, it should be kept in mind that intermediate and low-quality videos are also available. Users should not assume the quality of the videos based on the number of views, likes, dislikes, and comments, but should focus more on video sources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Rheumatic Diseases , Social Media , Video Recording , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Information Dissemination , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
Muscle Nerve ; 64(3): 270-276, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219308

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/AIMS: Telemedicine may be particularly well-suited for myasthenia gravis (MG) due to the disorder's need for specialized care, its hallmark fluctuating muscle weakness, and the potential for increased risk of virus exposure among patients with MG during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic during in-person clinical visits. A disease-specific telemedicine physical examination to reflect myasthenic weakness does not currently exist. METHODS: This paper outlines step-by-step guidance on the fundamentals of a telemedicine assessment for MG. The Myasthenia Gravis Core Exam (MG-CE) is introduced as a MG-specific, telemedicine, physical examination, which contains eight components (ptosis, diplopia, facial strength, bulbar strength, dysarthria, single breath count, arm strength, and sit to stand) and takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. RESULTS: Pre-visit preparation, remote ascertainment of patient-reported outcome scales and visit documentation are also addressed. DISCUSSION: Additional knowledge gaps in telemedicine specific to MG care are identified for future investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Myasthenia Gravis/diagnosis , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Physical Examination/methods , Physicians , Telemedicine/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Myasthenia Gravis/therapy , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Physical Examination/standards , Physicians/standards , Telemedicine/standards
5.
Laryngoscope ; 131(11): 2471-2477, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179005

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of at home drain removal in head and neck surgery patients. METHODS: The study population included patients who underwent head and neck surgery at an academic tertiary care center between February 2020 and November 2020 and were discharged with one to four drains with instructions for home removal. Prior to discharge, patients received thorough drain removal education. Patients were prospectively followed to evaluate for associated outcomes. RESULTS: One hundred patients were evaluated in the study. There was record for ninety-seven patients receiving education at discharge. The most common methods of education were face-to-face education and written instructions with educational video link provided. Of 123 drains upon discharge, 110 drains (89.4%) were removed at home while 13 (10.6%) were removed in office. Most drains were located in the neck (86.4%). There was one seroma, two hematomas, two drain site infections, and five ED visits; however, none of these complications were directly associated with the action of drain removal at home. Calculated cost savings for travel and lost wages was $259.82 per round trip saved. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that home drain removal can provide a safe and efficacious option for patients following head and neck surgery. This approach was safe and associated with patient cost savings and better utilization of provider's time. Furthermore, patients and healthcare providers avoided additional in-person encounters and exposures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings warrant further investigation into cost savings and formal patient satisfaction associated with home drain removal. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 131:2471-2477, 2021.


Subject(s)
Device Removal/adverse effects , Drainage/instrumentation , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Neck Dissection/methods , Patient Discharge/standards , Postoperative Care/instrumentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Device Removal/economics , Drainage/methods , Efficiency , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hematoma/epidemiology , Hematoma/etiology , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Infections/epidemiology , Infections/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neck Dissection/statistics & numerical data , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Patient Education as Topic/trends , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Safety , Seroma/epidemiology , Seroma/etiology , Time Factors
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(10): e22068, 2020 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-863364

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has markedly affected renal transplant care. During this time of social distancing, limited in-person visits, and uncertainty, patients and donors are relying more than ever on telemedicine and web-based information. Several factors can influence patients' understanding of web-based information, such as delivery modes (instruction, interaction, and assessment) and social-epistemological dimensions (choices in interactive knowledge building). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to systemically evaluate the content, delivery modes, and social-epistemological dimensions of web-based information on COVID-19 and renal transplantation at time of the pandemic. METHODS: Multiple keyword combinations were used to retrieve websites on COVID-19 and renal transplantation using the search engines Google.com and Google.nl. From 14 different websites, 30 webpages were examined to determine their organizational sources, topics, delivery modes, and social-epistemological dimensions. RESULTS: The variety of topics and delivery modes was limited. A total of 13 different delivery modes were encountered, of which 8 (62%) were instructional and 5 (38%) were interactional; no assessment delivery modes were observed. No website offered all available delivery modes. The majority of delivery modes (8/13, 62%) focused on individual and passive learning, whereas group learning and active construction of knowledge were rarely encountered. CONCLUSIONS: By taking interactive knowledge transfer into account, the educational quality of eHealth for transplant care could increase, especially in times of crisis when rapid knowledge transfer is needed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internet , Kidney Transplantation , Knowledge , Living Donors/education , Patient Education as Topic , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Patient Education as Topic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , Uncertainty
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL