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2.
Eur Respir Rev ; 32(168)2023 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317148

ABSTRACT

Awake prone positioning (APP) of patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure gained considerable attention during the early phases of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Prior to the pandemic, reports of APP were limited to case series in patients with influenza and in immunocompromised patients, with encouraging results in terms of tolerance and oxygenation improvement. Prone positioning of awake patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure appears to result in many of the same physiological changes improving oxygenation seen in invasively ventilated patients with moderate-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. A number of randomised controlled studies published on patients with varying severity of COVID-19 have reported apparently contrasting outcomes. However, there is consistent evidence that more hypoxaemic patients requiring advanced respiratory support, who are managed in higher care environments and who can be prone for several hours, benefit most from APP use. We review the physiological basis by which prone positioning results in changes in lung mechanics and gas exchange and summarise the latest evidence base for APP primarily in COVID-19. We examine the key factors that influence the success of APP, the optimal target populations for APP and the key unknowns that will shape future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , Wakefulness , Prone Position/physiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Lung , Patient Positioning/methods
3.
Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi ; 62(5): 568-571, 2023 May 01.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316792
4.
Surgeon ; 20(4): e144-e148, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307830

ABSTRACT

The utilisation of prone positioning has been vital during the COVID-19 pandemic, however risks the development of anterior pressure ulcers. An observational study was performed to examine the prevalence of pressure ulcers in this population and define risk factors. Eighty-seven patients admitted to critical care were studied. Of 62 patients with >1 day in prone position, 55 (88.7%) developed anterior pressure ulcers, 91% of which were anterior. The most commonly affected site were the oral commisures (34.6%), related to endotracheal tube placement. Prone positioning (p < .001) and the number of days prone (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.46-6.62, p = 0.003) were a significant risk factors in development of an anterior ulcer. Prone positioning is therefore a significant cause of anterior pressure ulcers in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Prone Position
6.
Crit Care ; 27(1): 98, 2023 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298389

ABSTRACT

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2023. Other selected articles can be found online at https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2023 . Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from https://link.springer.com/bookseries/8901 .


Subject(s)
Emergency Medicine , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Prone Position , Critical Care , Patient Positioning , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Intensive Care Units
8.
J Wound Care ; 31(LatAm sup 5): 6-9, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253637

ABSTRACT

SINOPSIS: El siguiente editorial presenta los resultados de una encuesta a los líderes de las 13 asociaciones de la Confederación Multidisciplinar Latinoamericana de Heridas, Estomas e Incontinencias (COMLHEI). La encuesta buscó determinar, de manera general, la situación de los pacientes con Covid-19 en posición prono (PP) con desarrollo de lesiones por presión (LPP). Los resultados indican que, en América latina, las LPP en pacientes en PP son frecuentes. Se evidenciaron deficiencias en estudios epidemiológicos y de elementos de protección, prevención y educación, además de brechas entre los diferentes países e instituciones en cuanto a la disponibilidad de personal para poder cumplir con las recomendaciones de posicionamiento de los pacientes. Las autoras sugieren tener en cuenta los resultados del estudio internacional PRONEtect para identificar, revisar y evaluar las pautas internacionales de pronación y cuidado de la piel, y hacer un inventario de los equipos y recursos de capacitación de uso común.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Prone Position , Patient Positioning
10.
Intern Emerg Med ; 18(3): 691-709, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2170390

ABSTRACT

The objective of the study was to evaluate all available systematic reviews on the use of prone positional ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). An umbrella review on the efficacy of prone positional ventilation in adult patients ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome was conducted. We performed a systematic search in the database of Medline (Pubmed), Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Epistemonikos. The ROBIS tools and GRADE methodology were used to assess the risk of bias and certainty of evidence. We estimated the necessary number of patients to be treated to have benefit. For the synthesis of the result, we selected the review with the lowest risk of bias. Sixteen systematic reviews including 64 randomized clinical trials and evaluating the effect of prone positional ventilation, with or without other ventilation strategies were included. Aoyama 2019 observed prone positioning, without complementary ventilation strategies, leading to a reduction in the 28-day mortality only when compared to high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.39-0.95) and lung-protective ventilation in the supine position (RR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48-0.98), with an ARR of 9.32% and 14.94%, an NNTB of 5.89 and 8.04, and a low and moderate certainty of evidence, respectively. Most reviews had severe methodological flaws that led to results with very low certainty of evidence. The review with the lowest risk of bias presented results in favor of prone positional ventilation compared with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and lung-protective ventilation. There is a need to update the available reviews to obtain more accurate results.


Subject(s)
Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Adult , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Patient Positioning/methods
11.
Respir Physiol Neurobiol ; 310: 104015, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2182741

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome coronavirus disease-2 (SARS-CoV-2) can lead to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) with possible multisystemic involvement. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch and shunt increase are critical determinants of hypoxemia. Understanding hypoxemia and the mechanisms involved in its genesis is essential to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy. High flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) and awake prone positioning (APP) in patients with COVID-19 AHRF showed promising benefits. The aim of this systematic review was to depict current situation around the combined use of HFNO and APP in patients with COVID-19 AHRF. Particularly, to investigate and report the pathophysiological rationale for adopting this strategy and to evaluate the (1) criteria for initiation, (2) timing, monitoring and discontinuation, and to assess the (3) impact of HFNO/ APP on outcome. METHODS: We performed a systematic search collecting the articles present in PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases with the following keywords: COVID-19 pneumonia, high flow nasal oxygen, awake prone position ventilation. RESULTS: Thirteen studies displayed inclusion criteria and were included, accounting for 1242 patients who received HFNO/ APP. The combination of HFNO/ APP has an encouraging pathophysiological rationale for implementing this technique. The recognition of patients who can benefit from HFNO/ APP is difficult and there are no validated protocols to start, monitoring, and discontinue HFNO/ APP therapy. The most used method to monitor the efficacy and failure of this combined technique are oxygenation indexes, but discontinuation techniques are inconsistently and poorly described limiting possible generatability. Finally, this technique provided no clear benefits on outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic search provided positive feedbacks for improving the utilization of this combination technique, although we still need further investigation about methods to guide timing, management, and discontinuation, and to assess the intervention effect on outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oxygen , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Hypoxia , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Wakefulness
12.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 310, 2022 Dec 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196460

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone position has already been demonstrated to improve survival in non-COVID acute respiratory distress syndrome and has been widely performed in COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure, both in non-intubated and intubated patients. However, the beneficial effect of the prone position in COVID-19 pneumonia still remains controversial. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the prone position compared with the non-prone in non-intubated and intubated COVID-19 patients, respectively. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases, as well as one Korean domestic database, on July 9, 2021, and updated the search 9 times to September 14, 2022. Studies that compared prone and non-prone positions in patients with COVID-19 were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcomes were mortality, need for intubation, and adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 1259 records identified, 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 23 nonrandomized studies (NRSs) were eligible. In the non-intubated patients, the prone position reduced the intubation rate compared with the non-prone position in 6 RCTs (n = 2156, RR 0.81, P = 0.0002) and in 18 NRSs (n = 3374, RR 0.65, P = 0.002). In the subgroup analysis according to the oxygen delivery method, the results were constant only in the HFNC or NIV subgroup. For mortality, RCTs reported no difference between prone and non-prone groups, but in NRSs, the prone position had a significant advantage in mortality [18 NRSs, n = 3361, relative risk (RR) 0.56, P < 0.00001] regardless of the oxygen delivery methods shown in the subgroup analysis. There was no RCT for intubated patients, and mortality did not differ between the prone and non-prone groups in NRSs. Adverse events reported in both the non-intubated and intubated groups were mild and similar between the prone and non-intubated groups. CONCLUSION: For non-intubated patients with COVID-19, prone positioning reduced the risk of intubation, particularly in patients requiring a high-flow oxygen system. However, the survival benefit was unclear between the prone and non-prone groups. There was insufficient evidence to support the beneficial effects of prone positioning in intubated patients. Trial registration This study was registered in the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews on February 16, 2022 (Registration No.: CRD42022311150 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Oxygen , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
13.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 29(1): 1-7, 2023 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190980

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Since the early pandemic, prone positioning has been broadly utilized for nonintubated patients (so-called 'awake prone positioning, APP') with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) induced acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF). RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous clinical studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of APP on oxygenation, intubation, and mortality. However, several questions remain unclear, such as the patient populations who benefit most from APP, the best length of daily duration on APP, how to improve adherence to APP, and the mechanisms of APP efficacy. SUMMARY: APP has been shown to improve oxygenation for patients with COVID-19 induced AHRF and is a safe treatment. However, the benefits of reducing intubation rates are only seen in moderate-to-severe patients who are undergoing HFNC treatment. In these patients, APP should be initiated early and with a target of at least 8 h/day of APP. Pillows under the body and patients-healthcare team collaboration to find the optimal position is essential to enhance patients' adherence. Oxygenation improvement and changes in the lung ultrasound findings may help to identify those patients who are more likely to avoid the need for intubation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Lung , Patient Positioning
16.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(12): 1793-1795, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2128543
17.
JBJS Case Connect ; 11(1)2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115210

ABSTRACT

CASE: We describe a preliminary report of 3 cases of ulnar neuropathy after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and treatment with intermittent prone positioning. CONCLUSION: Ulnar neuropathy may be associated with recent COVID-19 infection. The natural process of the disease and intermittent prone positioning are likely risk factors contributing to this finding. Conservative management seems to lead to improvement of symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Prone Position , Ulnar Neuropathies/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Anaesthesiologie ; 71(11): 858-864, 2022 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085322

ABSTRACT

Meralgia paraesthetica (MP) is the consequence of an entrapment or stretch injury of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve at the crossing region with the inguinal ligament where the nerve exits the pelvis. It results in temporary or permanent sensory loss, paraesthesia and pain in the anterolateral region of the thigh. Idiopathic forms are known for example as seat belt syndrome or jeans syndrome. An MP can also occur as a complication of surgical or intensive care patient positioning. In focus are the lithotomy position, prone position and beach chair position.We analyzed 21 complaints about MP occurring for the first time postoperatively, which had been submitted to the expert committee for medical treatment errors at the North Rhine Medical Association over the past 10 years. Among these, six cases could be identified as positioning damage after a lithotomy position. In three cases MP occurred after supine positioning but the etiology could not be clarified with certainty. In 12 cases MP was recognized as a direct surgical complication.The pathophysiology, incidence and course as well as legal implications of position-related MP are discussed. Pressure damage to the nerve at its intersection with the inguinal ligament is assumed to be the main pathomechanism. Although all the cases presented here occurred after lithotomy positioning, the complication also appears to occur with other types of positioning according to the literature data, the most common being prone positioning. This also explains the increasingly published case reports of MP after prone positioning in COVID-19 patients for respiratory treatment. Safe avoidance of the positioning-related complication does not appear to be possible due to the anatomical variability of the course of the nerve and the unclear pathomechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Femoral Neuropathy , Nerve Compression Syndromes , Humans , Femoral Neuropathy/etiology , Nerve Compression Syndromes/etiology , Thigh/innervation , Patient Positioning/adverse effects
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